Wisconsin Native

Showing 57–64 of 98 results

  • Liatris aspera Rough blazing star Z 4-9

    Feathery purple buttons along tall spike

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Feathery purple buttons along tall spike in late summer: August-October, after all other Liatris are done flowering.

    Size: 24”-30” x 12”-18”
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil
    Native: So. Canada, much of eastern 3/4th of U.S.
    Wildlife Value: attract butterflies (favorite nectar for Monarchs and Buckeyes) & hummingbirds.

    Aspera is Latin meaning rough.  1st collected by Frenchman André Michaux (1746-1802) who spent 11 years in America collecting hundreds of new plants.

  • Liatris spicata Blazing star, Gayfeather Z 4-9

    Showy rosy purple spikes in July & August

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    Showy rosy purple spikes in July & August. Great cut flowers.

    Size: 3-4' x 18"
    Care: sun in moist well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: Eastern and southern U. S., Wisconsin native

    Native Americans used the roots medicinally. The Dakota recognized this as an indication “when the flower is blue-red that corn is good to eat.” The dried root reputedly repelled moths. First collected by English naturalist Mark Catesby around 1732.

  • Lilium superbum Meadow lily Z 4-8

    Briliant orange with purple spots, turks-cap type lily blooming in late summer to early fall

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    Briliant orange with purple spots, turks-cap type lily blooming in late summer to early fall

    Size: 10’ x 12”
    Care: shade to sun in moist, acidic soil
    Native: from VT to Fl & west to Mississippi River, incl. Wisconsin

    Lilium was named for the Greek word for smooth, polished referring to its leaves Collected before 1762. Sold in America’s 1st plant catalog, Bartram’s Broadside, 1783. L.H. Bailey (1913): “The most magnificent and showy of native North American species, well worthy of extensive cultivation.”

  • Lobelia cardinalis Cardinal flower Z 3-9

    Ruby, cardinal red tubes with an upper lip split in half and a lower lip like a pixie’s apron encircle the spike from August to October beckon hummingbirds to feed.

    $9.25/bareroot

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    Ruby, cardinal red tubes with an upper lip split in half and a lower lip like a pixie’s apron encircle the spike from August to October beckon hummingbirds to feed.

    Size: 3’ x 12”
    Care: sun to part shade in fertile, moist soil. Moist soil important
    Native: sun to part shade in fertile, moist soil. Moist soil important
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds
    Awards: Received England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit & Missouri Botanic Garden Plant of Merit.

    Lobelia is named for Matthias L’Obel (1538-1616) French expatriate who immigrated to England and became physician to English King James I. Tradescant the Younger introduced L. cardinalis to European gardens when he sent it to England in 1637. Later collected by Rev. John Banister who moved to colonial Virginia in 1678. A gunman mistakenly shot and killed him while he collected plants. Offered for sale in Bartram Garden’s 1783 Broadside, America’s 1st plant catalog. Cherokee cured stomach aches, worms, pain, fever, nose bleeds, rheumatism, headaches, colds and croup with Lobelia. They used the root to treat syphilis and in 1749 Swedish botanist Peter Kalm wrote that Indians used five species of Lobelia to cure venereal disease, “an infallible art of curing it.” Other Indians and colonists used the plant to induce vomiting and as an expectorant. At the end of a funeral, Meskwaki Indians threw the dried and pulverized plant into the grave. Meskwaki also chopped the roots and secretly put it in the food of “a quarrelsome pair.” Allegedly “this makes the pair love each other again.” Grown by Washington at Mount Vernon and Thomas Jefferson at Monticello. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Lobelia siphilitica Great lobelia Z 5-9

    Medium to dark blue racemes from August to October

    $9.25/bareroot

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    Medium to dark blue racemes of two-lipped flowers from August to October

    Size: 3' x 12"
    Care: Full sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Eastern United States
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies and hummingbirds.

    Introduced to gardens before 1665. Cherokee used the root to treat syphilis and in 1749 Swedish botanist Peter Kalm wrote that Indians used Lobelia to cure venereal disease, having “an infallible art of curing it.”

  • Lupinus perennis Sun-dial lupin, Old maid’s bonnet, wild pea Z. 4-9

    Many flowered blue, pea flowered raceme May-June

    $8.95/BAREROOT

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    Many flowered blue, pea flowered raceme May-June

    Size: 1-2' x 12"
    Care: full sun in well drained soil. A legume, so it enriches the soil by adding nitrogen.
    Native: Maine to FL, Ontario to MN to Louisiana.
    Wildlife Value: Attracts both hummingbirds and butterflies. The only food for larvae of endangered species, Karner Blue butterfly.

    Lupinus is Latin from Lupus meaning “wolf.”  Likely sent from its native Virginia to England by Tradescant the Younger in 1637. Certainly collected by Michaux, late 1700’s.  Grown by Jefferson.  The Cherokee used this to stop bleeding.  The Menominee fattened their horses with this Lupin and made them spirited.  They rubbed the plant on themselves to give power to control the horses.

  • Mertensia virginica Virginia bluebells Z 3-7

    pink buds turn to sky blue trumpets

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Available for purchase in Spring only

    Pink buds turn to sky blue trumpets in May.  Ephemeral, dies back in summer.

    Size: 18" x 10"
    Care: Moist well-drained soil in part shade. Deer resistant.
    Native: N.Y. to Tennessee, west to Kansas, Wisconsin native

    First collected by John Banister in colonal Virginia.  Named Mertensia after Franz Karl Mertens, a German botanist who never set foot in America.  Cherokee cured whooping cough and consumption with Virginia bluebells.  Grown by both Washington and Jefferson.  “Gentian blue … very pretty and worthy of culture,” Sanders 1913.  Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll, mother of mixed perennial borders, in 1908.

  • Monarda fistulosa Wild bergamont Z 3-9

    Lavender tubes and bracts encircle 3' tall square stems

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Lavender tubes and bracts encircle 3′ tall square stems in July and August.

    Size: 3-4' x spreading
    Care: Sun to part shade any soil. Drought tolerant Walnut toxicity resistant.
    Native: central U.S., Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts both butterflies and hummingbirds

    Fistulosa refers to the hollow stem. Native Americans used the plant for abdominal pain, pimples, and chest pain in children. Sent to Europe by Tradescant the Younger in 1637. Cultivated by George Washington.