Wisconsin Native

Showing 41–44 of 109 results

  • Delphinium exaltatum Tall Larkspur

    lavender or purple spikes of trumpets

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Fabulous, lavender or purple spikes of trumpets on tall stems in July to August.

    Size: 3-5' x 9"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well drained soil. Withstands winds, no staking needed. Not fussy like fancy hybrids.
    Native: From Minnesota to Alabama, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attract hummingbirds

    Delphinium, named by Dioscorides, is Greek for “dolphin” due to the resemblance of the flower shape.  Cultivated by Jefferson at Monticello where he planted it in the NW quarter of the outer border in March 1811.

  • Delphinium tricorne Dwarf larkspur, Spring larkspur Z 4-8

    Spring ephemeral of blue delphinium elf-cap spikes – an absolute delight. Substitute these for tulips, a favorite food of deer and rabbits

    $8.25/bareroot

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    Spring ephemeral of blue delphinium elf-cap spikes – an absolute delight. Substitute these for tulips, a favorite food of deer and rabbits

    Size: 18-24” – 6-9”
    Care: sun to shade in moist well-drained to moist soil
    Native: PA to IA, s. to GA, AL, AR & e. OK
    Wildlife Value: food for hummingbirds and butterflies; deer & rabbit resistant.

    Collected by Andre Michaux c. 1800. Cherokee used this for heart ailments and reported that it makes cows intoxicated and they die. The name tricorne comes from the 3-cornered shape of its seeds, like the shape of colonial hats with brims turned up on three sides.

  • Deschampsia caespitosa Hair grass Z 4-9

    Airy pink panicles of seed heads

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Airy pink panicles like delicate billowing clouds of seed heads top clumps of arching slender leaves in mid summer persisting through winter.

    Size: 2-4' x 18"
    Care: moist well-drained to moist soil in sun to shade.
    Native: Europe, Asia & No. America

    Deschampsia named for French botanist Deslongchamps (1774-1849).  This species found by the mid 1700’s.

  • Dodecatheon meadia Pink Shooting Star Z 4-8 Ephemeral

    Rosy-lilac reflexed flowers, looking like a descending shuttlecock, dangle from stems in spring

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Rosy-lilac reflexed flowers, looking like a descending shuttlecock, dangle from stems in spring

    Size: 12-24” x 6-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil.
    Native: PA to Wisconsin, south to TX.
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit

    Name Dodecatheon from the Greek dodeka (twelve) and theos (gods), meaning 12 superior gods, after the name given to another plant by Roman author, Pliny the Elder. The species name meadia after Richard Mead, physician to George III. John Tradescant the Younger sent this to England by 1640. “A favorite among old border flowers.” William Robinson, 1899.