Archives

Listing of plants we no longer grow, but have preserved the pages for informational use.

Showing 1–8 of 125 results

  • Achillea ageratifolia Greek yarrow Z 4-8

    Silvery foliage smothered with porcelain white flowers June-August, fragrant

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    Silvery foliage smothered with porcelain white flowers June-August, fragrant

    Size: 6”x 18”
    Care: sun in dry to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Balkans, Greece & Yugoslavia
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies, deer resistant.
    Size: Good in rock garden & troughs.

    Achillea named for Achilles who used Achillea millefolium to bandage bleeding wounds for his soldiers. According to Philip Miller (1768) Achillea’s common name is “Nosebleed.” Ageratifloia means leaves like an Ageratum.
    Collected before 1796.

  • Achillea nana Dwarf yarrow Z 4-7

    White flowers over grey-green foliage blooms for nearly 2 months in summer.

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    White flowers over grey-green foliage blooms for nearly 2 months in summer.

    Size: 2-4” x spreading
    Care: sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: mountains of central Europe

    Collected before 1753. Philip Miller’s The Gardener’s Dictionary (1768) wrote that it is a “native of the Alps…very hardy … will thrive in any soil (and) deserve(s) a place in gardens.” Achillea named for Achilles, hero of Homer’s Illiad, used Achillea millefolium to stop bleeding of his wounded soldiers at the siege of Troy. Achilles learned about the uses of Achillea from Chiron, the Centaur. Nana means “dwarf.”

  • Aconitum fischeri Fischer’s monkshood syn. A. carmichaelii

    Spikes of cobalt blue hooded blooms September – October

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    Spikes of cobalt blue hooded blooms September – October       POISON

    Size: 24-36”x 10”
    Care: part shade in moist soil
    Native: No. Japan, E. Russia, Korea, China
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant. Attracts butterflies.

    The name Aconitum is from the mythical hill Aconitus in Pontica where Hercules fought with Cerberus.  Philip Miller in The Gardener’s Dictionary (1768) wrote that the name Aconitum comes from Greek word for dart “because the Barbarians used to daub their darts therewith.” The Monkshood reputedly sprang from the jaws of Cerberus, the guard dog of the underworld.  In China called “bao ye wo tou.”  Wm. Robinson considered this one of the best monkshoods.  Collected before 1820.

  • Aconitum napellus ‘Albus’ White Monkshood, Wolfsbane Z 4-8 POISON

    Purest of white hooded blooms flowering along spikes in mid to late summer

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    Purest of white hooded blooms flowering along spikes in mid to late summer

    Size: 2-3” x 18-24”
    Care: part shade, cool, moist soil
    Native: Europe

    The name Aconitum is from the mythical hill Aconitus in Pontica where Hercules fought with Cerberus. The Monkshood reputedly sprang from the jaws of Cerberus, the guard dog of the underworld. Believed to make a potion that helped witches fly. This was identified by Dioscordies in De Materica Medica for medicinal use around 70 A.D. Philip Miller in The Gardener’s Dictionary (1768) wrote that the name Aconitum comes from Greek word for dart “because the Barbarians used to daub their darts therewith.” He also considered “in flower it makes a pretty appearance.”Used by physicians in 1200’s and to poison wolves: “This Wolf’s bayne of all poisons is the most hastie poison.” Wm. Turner, 1560’s. Called Monkshood due to the shape of each flower like a monk’s hood.
    This white variety in English gardens before 1768, Philip Miller’s Garden Dictionary

  • Aconitum napellus Monkshood Wolfsbane Z 5-8 POISON

    Midsummer, blue spikes of hooded blooms

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    Midsummer, blue spikes of hooded blooms.

    Size: 2-3’x 12”
    Care: part shade, cool, moist soil
    Native: Europe
    Awards: Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden Great Plant Picks

    The name Aconitum is from the mythical hill Aconitus in Pontica where Hercules fought with Cerberus.  The Monkshood reputedly sprang from the jaws of Cerberus, the guard dog of the underworld.  Believed to make a potion that helped witches fly.  Philip Miller in The Gardener’s Dictionary (1768) wrote that the name Aconitum comes from Greek word for dart “because the Barbarians used to daub their darts therewith.” Used by physicians in 1200’s and to poison wolves:  “This Wolf’s bayne of all poisons is the most hastie poison.”  Wm. Turner, 1560’s.  Introduced to the new world by John Winthrop in 1631. Miller wrote “in flower it makes a pretty appearance” so that many people grow it in their gardens.

  • Adiantum aleuticum Western Maidenhair Fern Z 3-9

    Bright green fronds perch atop black stems like the fingers of an open hand

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    Bright green fronds perch atop black stems like the fingers of an open hand

    Size: 30” x 30”
    Care: shade in moist, well-drained soil
    Native: East and west of the Cascade Mountains and is also found scattered along the eastern seaboard
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant
    Awards: Elisabeth C Miller Great Plant Pick, Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    According to folklore if a girl can hold the stem without causing the leaves to tremble, then she was chaste.
    Natives used the stems in basketry designs and made tea from the leaves to use as a hair wash.  Quinault burnt the leaves and rubbed ashes in their hair to make it long, shiny and black.  California Natives used the stems for pierced earrings, inserting them into the ear lobe to keep the hole from closing. They chewed the leaves to remedy internal wounds, chest pain, or stomach trouble and made a cough syrup from it.

  • Aesculus pavia

    Spectacular raspberry colored upright panicles in spring

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    Spectacular raspberry colored upright panicles in spring

    Size: 15’ x 10’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well drained soil- understory tree
    Native: eastern US
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies & feeds hummingbirds
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit; Pennsylvania Horticultural Society Gold Medal Plant Award & Missouri Botanic Garden Award of Merit

    Aesculus is a Latin name for a nut bearing tree. Pavia comes from Peter Pav, a Dutch professor at University of Leyden. This plant collected by John Bartram and sent to England by 1711. Jefferson grew this at Monticello, planted in 1798. Nuts from the tree were used by Native Americans to stupefy fish. Chickasaws pulverized the root, placed it in baskets and violently churned the baskets in the river to poison fish. Cherokee Indians carried the nuts in their pockets for good luck, as well as for curing piles and rheumatism. Pounded nuts also cured swelling, sprains, tumors and infections.

  • Agastache aurantiaca Navajo sunset Z 5-9

    Brilliant light orange blooms from spring-fall, silvery-grey aromatic foliage

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    Brilliant light orange blooms from spring-fall, silvery-grey aromatic foliage

    Size: 12-18” x 24”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Western US
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies, hummingbirds, and birds. Deer and rabbit resistant

    Published in American Midland Naturalist 1945.