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Showing 25–32 of 125 results

  • Camassia quamash Wild Hyacinth, Leichtlin’s Camass Z 4-8

    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

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    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

    Size: 15” x 12"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, well-drained soil
    Native: Pacific Northwest
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer & rabbit resistant

    First documented by Lewis & Clark near the Nez Perce village in the Cascade Mountains. Nez Perce hunters gave Clark a cake made with Camassia.  Important food crop for First Americans. Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll 1908.

  • Campanula collina Dark blue bellflower Z. 5-8

    In summer dark blue-purple bells on upright stems on clumps of this bellflower.

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    In summer dark blue-purple bells on upright stems on clumps of this bellflower.

    Size: 6-12” x 8”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained
    Native: western Asia, Turkey, Caucasus Mountains

    Campanula is Latin meaning “little bell.” Collina means “on hills.” Collected before 1826.

  • Campanula punctata var. rubriflora Z 4-9

    Dangling rosy purple bells hide their red spots inside the petals

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    Dangling rosy purple bells hide their red spots inside the petals – early summer

    Size: 12”x16” & spreading
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Japan
    Awards: Top rated for ornamental traits and landscape performance by the Chicago Botanic Garden.

    Campanula is Latin meaning little bell. Punctata means spotted. In 1629 Parkinson described campanulas as “cherished for the beautie of their flowers.”  This variety collected in Japan before 1950.

  • Caragana rosea Pink peashrub Z 3-8

    Rose-pink , pea like flowers May-June on prior years wood. Flowers give way to slender yellowish-green seed pods that mature to brown in late summer. Yellowish fall color.

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    Rose-pink , pea like flowers May-June on prior years wood. Flowers give way to slender yellowish-green seed pods that mature to brown in late summer. Yellowish fall color.

    Size: 3-4’ x 3-4’
    Care: full sun to light shade in dry to medium, well-drained soil. Perfom well in areas with hot summers and cold winters.
    Native: Slopes and valleys in central and NE China, Japan and Russia
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer resistant

    Plants are considered to be xerophilous (capable of thriving in dry, hot locations). Described by Nicolai Stepanowitsch Turczaninow in Primitiae Florae Amurensis 470. 1859

  • Carex davalliana Bath’s sedge, Davall’s sedge Z 4-8

    Short hedge-hog like clump with white flowers

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    Short hedge-hog like clump with white flowers turning to bronzy spiked seedheads May-June. Best for rock, railroad or fairy gardens – anyplace for a miniature, clumping grass.

    Size: 6” x 12”
    Care: sun to light shade in moist soil
    Native: wet places in Europe and western No. America

    Collected before 1798 by Edmund Davall who botanized in Switzerland.

  • Carex montana Soft-leaved Sedge Z 4-10

    Soft mounding grass with small brown flower spikes March-April

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    Soft mounding grass with small brown flower spikes March-April

    Size: 10” X 10”
    Care: Part sun to shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Europe, Caucasas, West Siberia

    Linnaeus 1753

  • Catanache caerulea Cupid’s dart Z 4-8

    July – September violet cornflower-like flowers with rectangular petals fringed at the ends with deep purple centers.

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    July – September violet cornflower-like flowers with rectangular petals fringed at the ends with deep purple centers.

    Size: 16-18” x 8-12”
    Care: sun in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Mediterranean

    An aphrodisiac in ancient Greece. The genus name is adapted from the Greek name for this plant, Katananke which means “forced down against choice” or “compulsion,” as it was believed to be the date rape drug of its day. It is called Cupid’s dart even now because Greeks & Romans used the plant into food of an object of affection. However, it has no actual effect, except perhaps belief in a myth.

  • Ceanothus americanus New Jersey tea, Ping-pong tea Z 4-8

    Compact, dense shrub bearing bright green leaves and billowing clusters of fragrant white flowers above the foliage in late spring and early summer.

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    Compact, dense shrub bearing bright green leaves and billowing clusters of fragrant white flowers above the foliage in late spring and early summer.

    Size: 3-4’ x 3-5’
    Care: full sun in fertile, well-drained soil
    Native: eastern North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Host for Spring Azure, Summer Azure, Mottled Duskywing butterflies. Birds eat the Seeds. Supports over 30 bee species.

    Native Americans used Ceanothus americanus to wash injured feet and to cure toothaches, constipation and short breath. Sent to England around 1715 by Mark Catesby, English naturalist.   Leaves used extensively to make tea during the American Revolution. Twigs made a cinnamon-colored dye. Cherokee cooked a medicinal tea from the roots to cure toothaches and stomach ailments. Jefferson grew this as part of a shrubbery west of the house at Monticello in 1771.