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Showing 49–56 of 125 results

  • Echinacea purpurea Purple coneflower Z 3-8

    Iconic dark pink rays with orange-rust cones from mid-summer to fall  

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    Iconic dark pink rays with orange-rust cones from mid-summer to fall

     

    Size: 3’ x 18”
    Care: sun in well-drained humusy soil
    Native: MI S. to Louisiana, incl. Wisconsin
    Wildlife Value: Attracts many butterfly species in the summer. In winter Gold finches feast on the seeds.

    American Indians used Purple coneflower as a remedy for more ailments than any other plant, e.g. smoke treatment to cure headaches and sexually transmitted diseases, applied topically to toothaches and mumps and juice used for burns. The Winnebagos used the plant in advance to protect against burns. Also used to cure distemper in horses.   Introduced into garden cultivation by John Tradescant the Younger in 1640.

  • Echium vulgare Vipers bugloss Self-sowing biennial Z 3-8

    Spikes of true blue blossoms touched with a hint of pink, May through September

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    Spikes of true blue blossoms touched with a hint of pink, May through September. Self-seeds readily, considered noxious weed in Washington.  Bristly hairs on stems can cause skin irritation

    Can not ship to: Idaho, Maryland and Montana

    Size: 2-3’ x 12”
    Care: sun in most any soil
    Native: Europe.
    Wildlife Value: Important pollinator for bees.

    In past leaves boiled for a tea to remedy headaches and fevers.  In mid-1700’s grew on chalky lands over most of England.  Echium is Greek for Viper’s bugloss because a concoction of the root and wine supposedly cured snake bites or acc’d to Gardeners’ Dictionary 1768 “because the ripe seed of this plant resembles the head of a viper.”

  • Engelmannia peristenia syn. E. pinnatafida Engelmann’s Daisy Z 4-8

    Clusters of golden-yellow daisy-like flowers, May-August, over an evergreen rosette

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    Clusters of golden-yellow daisy-like flowers, May-August, over an evergreen rosette

    Size: 18-36” x 15-18”
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: South central US
    Wildlife Value: Attracts birds for the seeds, Bees & butterflies for nectar/pollen. Rabbit resistant.

    First published in 1840 by Nuttal/Gray.  Named for George Engelmann (1809-1884) who was born in Germany and settled in St. Louis, Missouri, as a young man. He was a physician and botanist.  When he died much of his collection went to Missouri Botanical Garden.

  • Eryngium amethystinum Amethyst sea holly Z. 3-8

    Metallic amethyst stems, spiny bracts and cone-shaped flower in July and August

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    Metallic amethyst stems, spiny bracts and cone-shaped flower in July and August

    Size: 28” x 28”
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil, drought tolerant
    Native: Italy & southern Alps
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & butterflies, birds eat seeds. Deer & rabbit resistant
    Awards: Great Plant Pick Award from Elizabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden.

    Garden cultivation since 1648. Long prized for its metallic luster.

  • Gentiana andrewsii Bottle gentian Z 4-9

    Blue bottle-like or oval balloon blooms in late summer

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    Blue bottle-like or oval balloon blooms in late summer

    Size: 12-24” x 6”
    Care: full sun to part shade in humusy, moist to moist well drained, acidic soil
    Native: Eastern North America, Wisconsin

    Gentian named after King Gentius of Illyria in the Adriatic.  He discovered medicinal uses for gentians around 180 B.C.

  • Globularia trichosantha Blue Globe Daisy Z 5-9

    Globe-shaped blue puffs bloom in late spring above a mat of evergreen foliage

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    Globe-shaped blue puffs bloom in late spring above a mat of evergreen foliage

    Size: 6-8” x 8-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Balkan region of eastern Europe.
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees

    Collected before 1839.

  • Hamamelis vernalis Spring witch-hazel Z4-8

    Unusual, small yellow-red fragrant flowers in very early spring February-April. Showy golden foliage in fall. Hardy & durable.

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    Unusual, small yellow-red fragrant flowers in very early spring February-April. Showy golden foliage in fall. Hardy & durable.

    Size: 6-10’ x spreading
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil, tolerates clay. Prune in spring after flowering.
    Native: Ozark Plateau of MO, OK & AK
    Awards: Missouri Botanic Garden Plant of Merit.
    Size: Native Americans made extracts of the leaves, bark and stems to remedy inflammation & bruises.

    Collected by 1908.

  • Hamamelis virginiana Witch hazel Z 3-8

    Oval shaped leaves turn quality shades of yellow in fall then stem-hugging clusters of yellow flowers of ribbon-shaped petals cling to branches from October to December.

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    Oval shaped leaves turn quality shades of yellow in fall then stem-hugging clusters of yellow flowers of ribbon-shaped petals cling to branches from October to December.

    Size: 10-15’ x 10-15’, slow growth
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil to moist, acidic
    Native: Que. & N.S. to n. MI & s.e. MN, s. to FL & TX. Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts birds, Deer resistant

    Collected by Michaux in late 1700’s. An extract of leaves, twigs, and bark is used in mildly astringent lotions and toilet water. A myth of witchcraft held that a forked branch of Witch-hazel could locate underground water. Native Americans used witch-hazel leaves for tea. Its oil used in medicines, eye-washes, after shave lotions and salves for soothing insect bites, burns and poison ivy rashes. Illustrated in Catesby’s Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands, published in series 1729-1747.