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Showing 33–40 of 122 results

  • Ceratostigma plumbaginoides Plumbago, Leadwort Z 5-9

    Cobalt blue flower clusters with contrasting, showy red stems

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    Cobalt blue flower clusters with contrasting, showy red stems and calyces  in late summer and fall.   Foliage turns crimson in fall – excellent groundcover. One of the most award winning plants.

    Size: 9-12” x 18”
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: China
    Awards: Five (5) of them! Georgia Gold Medal 2006, Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden Great Plant Picks, Missouri Botanical Garden Plant of Merit, Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit, Oklahoma Proven

    Plumbago is Latin meaning “lead” derived from use of the plant to treat lead poisoning. First collected by Russian botanist Alexander von Bunge in 1830 in Mongolia, then introduced by Robert Fortune who found it growing in Shanghi in 1846.  “Bear a profusion of brilliant cobalt blue flowers (when) the leaves take on a distinct reddish tinge.”  H.H. Thomas 1915.

  • Chrysanthemum serotinum syn. Leucanthemella serotina Autumn oxeye, Giant daisy Z 4-8

    Pure white daisies with golden centers, 2-3” across, aren’t just for summer. This one celebrates the fall.

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    Pure white daisies with golden centers, 2-3” across, aren’t just for summer. This one celebrates the fall.

    Size: 4-7’ x 12-24”
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: SE Europe & Balkans
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    Described by Linnaeus 1753. The Gardeners Dictionary (1783): “This grows naturally in North America but hath long been preserved in English gardens. …each(stalk) being terminated by a large, white, radiated flower; these appear in September. It multiplies very fast by its creeping roots.”

  • Clematis columbiana v. tenuiloba syn. C. alpina v. occidentalis sub. var. tenuiloba Rock clematis Z 3-8

    Deep violet elongated bells in early summer on short erect stems, only 6” high

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    Deep violet elongated bells in early summer on short erect stems, only 6” high

    Size: 6" x 12"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Rocky Mountains & the Dakotas

    1st described in 1881 by Harvard botanist Asa Gray

  • Clematis recta ‘Purpurea’ Ground clematis, Flammula clematis POISONOUS Z 3-9

    Fragrant star-shaped white blooms May-July on attractive purple foliage, fading to green by mid-summer.

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    Fragrant star-shaped white blooms May-July on attractive purple foliage, fading to green by mid-summer. Can be trained to climb or left as a groundcover. Handling plant may cause contact dermatitis or allergic reaction

    Size: 3-5' x 2-4'
    Care: sun to part shade with moist well-drained soil. Pinch back buds to maintain purple foliage longer-when plant blooms foliage fades to green.
    Native: Eastern, southern and central Europe.
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds, butterflies & bees; Deer and Black Walnut tolerant

    Recommended for its purple foliage in The Gardens of Gertrude Jekyll.

  • Codonopsis ovata syn. Glosocomia ovata syn. Wahlenbergia roylei Kashmir Bellflower, Bonnet Bellflower Z 3-7

    Large, single, pendulous, milky-blue bell-shaped flowers flared at the tips. Blooms July-August.

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    Large, single, pendulous, milky-blue bell-shaped flowers flared at the tips. Blooms July-August.

    Size: 15” x 15”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Himalayas, from Pakistan to Kashmir
    Wildlife Value: attracts Bees
    Size: Root is edible (but not tasty) when cooked. It can also be dried and ground into a powder. A famine food, used when all else fails. The roots and leaves have been used in its native areas to make a poultice for the treatment of bruises, ulcers and wounds. Medicinal use published 1895.

    Collected before 1835.

  • Cornus kousa Kousa dogwood Z 5-8

    Audacious, snow white 4” bracts for 4-6 weeks in June & July cover shrub’s horizontal branches, followed by crimson fruit in late summer & scarlet foliage in fall.

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    Audacious, snow white 4” bracts for 4-6 weeks in June & July cover shrub’s horizontal branches, followed by crimson fruit in late summer & scarlet foliage in fall.

    Considered an invasive/illegal species in Maryland

    Size: 15’ x 15’
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil Prune: little required, done in late winter
    Native: Asia
    Awards: Cary Award Distinctive Plants for New England

    Called Yamaboushi in its native Japan. In 1861 George Rogers Hall, residing in Yokohama, sent the 1st Cornus kousa seed to America from Japan. Francis Parkman sowed the seeds in his garden in Jamaica Plain MA garden. By the 1890’s 2 nurseries sold it in the U.S. – Parsons & Sons Co. and Yokohama Nursery. “Chinese” Wilson introduced the variety var. chinensis from Hupei Province in central China in 1907.

  • Cryptotaenia japonica ‘Atropurpurea’ Purple-leaved Japanese Wild Parsley, Japanese honeywort Z 4-7

    Flowers light pink small umbels in mid-summer but forget the flowers and grow this for its showy purple bronze stems and leaves, branched stems with deeply divided, compound leaves and slightly ruffled

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    Flowers light pink small umbels in mid-summer but forget the flowers and grow this for its showy purple bronze stems and leaves, branched stems with deeply divided, compound leaves and slightly ruffled edges

    Size: 18-24" x 8" and self-seeds to make clumps
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: eastern Asia

    1st described in Journal of Japanese Botany in 1926. Asians use Honeywort as a seasoning, a strengthening tonic and eat its sprouts in salads but toxic if eaten in large quantities.
    CAUTION: may cause dermatitis with repeated contact in some people; toxic if eaten in large quantities.

  • Cynara cardunculus Cardoon Z 7-9

    Spectacular basal foliage - arching, silvery, deeply incised leaves, Late summer-fall spiny buds open to rich purple feathery flowers.

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    In colder areas grow as annual
    Spectacular basal foliage – arching, silvery, deeply incised leaves. Late summer-fall spiny buds open to rich purple feathery flowers.

    Size: 3-4’ x 3-4’
    Care: sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Cut off flowers immediately after flowering to bring on new foliage, gorgeous into late fall.
    Native: Southern Europe

    The leaf stems, blanched, are also edible. Bridgemen, The Young Gardeners Assistant (1847)
    Described by Linneaus 1753.