Wisconsin Native

Showing 1–4 of 81 results

  • Adiantum pedatum Maidenhair fern Z.4-9

    Grown for its delicate leaflets arranged in rows. One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated 94 (2013)

    $8.25/4" tallpot

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    Grown for its delicate leaflets arranged in rows. One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated 94 (2013)

    Size: 12-24”x 12”
    Care: Shade in moist soil
    Native: all parts of No. America including Wisconsin
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Cherokee made a tea for flu, fever and rheumatism, and powdered parts for heart ailments, paralysis and asthma. Native Americans made a hair wash from the stems and applied a topical poultice of masticated fronds to a wound to arrest bleeding. 1st described by French botanist Cornu (1635). Introduced to France from Canada where it grew in “such quantities that the French send it from thence in package for other goods and the apothecaries at Paris use it for (another Adiantum) in all their compositions in which that is ordered.” Philip Miller (1768). Tradescant the Younger introduced this fern to garden cultivation when he sent it to England around 1638. English herbalist Nicholas Culpepper claimed it to be “a good remedy for coughs, asthmas, pleurisy, etc., and on account of it’s being a gentle diuretic also in jaundice, gravel and other impurities of the kidneys.” Father of the mixed perennial border, William Robinson, called this “elegant.” It “is unquestionably one of the most distinct and beautiful of the hardy ferns.” The Garden 1876.

    Adiantum is from Greek adiantos, unwettable because its fronds repel water.
    English herbalist Nicholas Culpepper claimed it to be “a good remedy for coughs, asthmas, pleurisy, etc., and on account of it’s being a gentle diuretic also in jaundice, gravel and other impurities of the kidneys.” Native Americans made a hair wash from the stems and applied a topical poultice of masticated fronds to a wound to arrest bleeding.

  • Agastache foeniculum, Anise hyssop

    Showy blue spikes from July to September, fragrant

    $9.75/bareroot

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    Agastache foeniculum  Anise hyssop Z 4-8
    Showy purple spikes from July to September, fragrant

    Size: 3-5' x 12"
    Care: Full sun to part shade in well-drained soil, drought tolerant & deer resistant
    Native: North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    The name Agastache is from Greek agan and stachys meaning much like an ear of wheat referring to the shape of the flower spike. Anise hyssop leaves were used by American Indians of the Missouri River region to make tea and as a sweetener in cooking. The Cheyenne used it to relieve chest pain due to coughing or to a dispirited heart. Listed hyssop as an aromatic herb in McMahon’s 1805 book.

  • Allium cernuum Nodding onion Z 4-8

    Umbels of arching stems with nodding bells of lilac shading to pink

    $6.95/bareroot

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    Allium cernuum  Nodding onion   Z 4-8
    Umbels of arching stems with nodding bells of lilac shading to pink, June – July.

    Size: 12”-18”x 3-6”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil, Deer resistant
    Native: Canada to Mexico, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Cernuum is Latin meaning “nodding.”  Many groups of 1st Americans ate the bulbs raw, roasted or dried for winter storage or as flavoring for soups and gravies. Cherokee used this plant medicinally to cure colds, hives, colic, “gravel & dropsy,” liver ailments, sore throats, “phthisic,” and feet in “nervous fever.”  Those in the Isleta Pueblo were not quite as creative as the Cherokee and used this only for sore throats and infections.  Collected for garden cultivation by 1834.

  • Andropogon scoparium Little bluestem Z 5-9

    Blue gray foliage turns plum orange in fall

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Andropogon scoparium  Little bluestem  Z 5-9
    Blue gray  foliage turns plum orange in fall  with wispy, feather-like seed heads

    Size: 18" x 12"
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: all No. America, Wisconsin native

    Discovered by French plant hunter André Michaux (1746-1802) in America’s prairies.  Comanche used it to relieve syphilitic sores.  Lakota made soft wispy seed heads into liners for moccasins.