Wisconsin Native

Showing 25–32 of 113 results

  • Baptisia sphaerocarpa Yellow wild indigo Z 5-8

    Spikes of yellow pea-like flowers

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Spikes of yellow pea-like flowers, a legume, in spring.

    Size: 2-3’ x 2-3’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to dry soil
    Native: Missouri to Mississippi to TX

    Baptisia is Greek meaning “to dye” referring to use of Baptisia australis as a substitute for indigo dye. Sphaerocarpa means “round seed.”  Collected by English planthunter Thomas Nuttall before 1834.

  • Calylophus serrulatus Yellow sundrops, Shrubby evening primrose Z 4-9

    Lemon yellow silky petals bloom late spring to early fall on this tough-as-nails native

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Lemon yellow silky petals bloom late spring to early fall on this tough-as-nails native

    Size: 9-18” x 12-15”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil, drought tolerant
    Native: Great Plains: Central Canada to TX, Michigan to Montana, WI native

    1st described in 1818 by Thomas Nuttall, English planthunter who collected hundreds of “new” plants in North America. Caly is Greek for calyx; lophos for “the back of the neck; crest of a hill or helmet”  serrulatus means “minutely serrate” or “saw-toothed” describing the leaf margins.

  • Campanula rotundifolia Harebell, Bluebell of Scotland Z 3-8

    Dainty bluish-lilac bells blooms June - October

    $8.25/pot

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    This Bluebell’s delicate appearance conceals its hardy constitution. Dainty bluish-lilac bells top 12″ stems on bushy plants blooming from June through October. Perfect for rock gardens and borders.

    Size: 9-12" x S 12"
    Care: Sun to part shade moist well-drained soil, tolerant Walnut toxicity
    Native: Europe, Siberia and North America, Wisconsin native

    No wonder Sir Walter Scott immortalized the Bluebell of Scotland in Lady of the Lake. Also a subject in Emily Dickinson’s poetry.

  • Carex comosa Longhair sedge, Bristly sedge Z 4-10

    Ornamental dangling bottle brush spikes from May to August

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Ornamental dangling bottle brush spikes from May to August

    Size: 2-4’ x 2’
    Care: Sun to part shade in wet to moist soil
    Native: all of sub-Arctic No. America except western intermountain states and provinces and except Alaska.
    Wildlife Value: food for caterpillars of several butterflies. Seeds provide food for wetland birds

    Rhizomes stabilize shorelines while plants give ducks cover and the seeds provide food. Good rain garden plant.

  • Carex grayi Gray’s Sedge Z 3-8

    Club-like maces in June through fall.

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Flowers look like club-like maces in June to December.  This one will make your friends & neighbors ask “what the heck is it?”

    Size: 30" x 24"
    Care: Full sun to part shade in moist soil
    Native: Vermont west to Wisconsin, south to Georgia and Missouri

    Collected before 1880.

  • Caulophyllum thalictroides Blue cohosh Z 3-8

    Glaucous blue-green leaves can be mistaken for meadowrue. Inconspicuous yellow flowers from April-May followed by blue-berried seeds in fall.

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    Glaucous blue-green leaves can be mistaken for meadowrue. Inconspicuous yellow flowers from April-May followed by blue-berried seeds in fall.

    Size: 1-3’ x 1’ slow spreading to form colonies
    Care: shade in moist well-drained soil, deer and rabbit resistant
    Native: Eastern and Central North America, WI Native
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees and moths, mice and birds eat the berries

    Collected by Michaux c. 1800.

  • Ceanothus americanus New Jersey tea, Ping-pong tea Z 4-8

    Compact, dense shrub bearing bright green leaves and billowing clusters of fragrant white flowers above the foliage in late spring and early summer.

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    $12.95/pot

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    Compact, dense shrub bearing bright green leaves and billowing clusters of fragrant white flowers above the foliage in late spring and early summer.

    Size: 3-4’ x 3-5’
    Care: full sun in fertile, well-drained soil
    Native: eastern North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Host for Spring Azure, Summer Azure, Mottled Duskywing butterflies. Birds eat the Seeds. Supports over 30 bee species.

    Native Americans used Ceanothus americanus to wash injured feet and to cure toothaches, constipation and short breath. Sent to England around 1715 by Mark Catesby, English naturalist.   Leaves used extensively to make tea during the American Revolution. Twigs made a cinnamon-colored dye. Cherokee cooked a medicinal tea from the roots to cure toothaches and stomach ailments. Jefferson grew this as part of a shrubbery west of the house at Monticello in 1771.

  • Celastrus scandens Bittersweet, Staff vine VINE Z 4-8

    Conspicuous orange fruit in autumn, persisting into winter

    $16.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    Conspicuous orange fruit in autumn, persisting into winter on the females of this native vine.

    Size: 20-30' x 6'
    Care: sun to part shade in any soil except wet
    Native: Eastern half of US west to South Dakota & south to NM

    Ointment made from bark simmered with a pound of lard remedied “swelling breasts, discuss or drive away tumors, swellings and piles.”  Cherokee drank a tea for stomach ailments.  HoChunk included root in a compound to cure colds.  Collected by Rev. John Banister in 1670’s.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.