Wisconsin Native

Showing 25–28 of 103 results

  • Carex grayi Gray’s Sedge Z 3-8

    Club-like maces in June through fall.

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Carex grayi     Gray’s Sedge  Z 3-8
    Flowers look like club-like maces in June to December.  This one will make your friends & neighbors ask “what the heck is it?”

    Size: 30" x 24"
    Care: Full sun to part shade in moist soil
    Native: Vermont west to Wisconsin, south to Georgia and Missouri

    Collected before 1880.

  • Ceanothus americanus New Jersey tea, Ping-pong tea Z 4-8

    Ceanothus americanus   New Jersey tea, Ping-pong tea     Z 4-8 Compact, dense shrub bearing bright green leaves and billowing clusters of fragrant white flowers above the foliage in late spring and early summer.

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    $16.95/bareroot

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    Ceanothus americanus   New Jersey tea, Ping-pong tea     Z 4-8
    Compact, dense shrub bearing bright green leaves and billowing clusters of fragrant white flowers above
    the foliage in late spring and early summer.

    Size: 3-4’ x 3-5’
    Care: full sun in fertile, well-drained soil
    Native: eastern North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Host for Spring Azure, Summer Azure, Mottled Duskywing butterflies. Birds eat the Seeds. Supports over 30 bee species.

    Native Americans used Ceanothus americanus to wash injured feet and to cure toothaches, constipation and short breath. Sent to England around 1715 by Mark Catesby, English naturalist.   Leaves used extensively to make tea during the American Revolution. Twigs made a cinnamon-colored dye. Cherokee cooked a medicinal tea from the roots to cure toothaches and stomach ailments. Jefferson grew this as part of a shrubbery west of the house at Monticello in 1771.

  • Celastrus scandens Bittersweet, Staff vine VINE Z 4-8

    Conspicuous orange fruit in autumn, persisting into winter

    $16.95/bareroot

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    Celastrus scandens   Bittersweet vine  Vine Z 4-8
    Conspicuous orange fruit in autumn, persisting into winter on the females of this native vine.

    Size: 20-30' x 6'
    Care: sun to part shade in any soil except wet
    Native: Eastern half of US west to South Dakota & south to NM

    Ointment made from bark simmered with a pound of lard remedied “swelling breasts, discuss or drive away tumors, swellings and piles.”  Cherokee drank a tea for stomach ailments.  HoChunk included root in a compound to cure colds.  Collected by Rev. John Banister in 1670’s.

  • Cephalanthus occidentalis Button bush, Honey balls Z 4-10

    Perfectly round, white flowers perfume the air in Aug. & Sept. Red leaf stems contrast with green foliage.

    $16.95/bareroot

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    Cephalanthus occidentalis  Button bush, Honey balls     Z 4-10
    Perfectly round, white flowers perfume the air in Aug. & Sept.  Red leaf stems contrast with green foliage.  Ships only in spring

    Size: 6' x 8'
    Care: Full sun to part shade in wet to moist well-drained soil
    Native: New Brunswick S. to Fla. W. to CA.
    Wildlife Value: Important shrub to maintain water quality and for wildlife habitat. Its roots absorb nutrients in water and reduce erosion along water's edges. Flowers attract butterflies. Birds nest in branches.

    Many medicinal uses for several tribes – Chickasaw, Choctaw, Kiowa, Meskwaki and Seminole, believed to remedy sore eyes, toothaches, dysentery, hemorrhages, headaches, nausea, fevers, constipation, ailments in horses and “wolf ghost sickness.” Rand 1866: “Valuable for blooming at a season when the shrubbery is bare of flowers.” Offered for sale in Bartram Garden’s 1783 Broadside, America’s 1st plant catalog.