Wisconsin Native

Showing 89–96 of 109 results

  • Scutellaria incana syn. Scutellaria canescens, Scutellaria villosa Downy skullcap Z 5-8

    Showy, open spikes of two-lipped Blue-violet florets from June-Sept  

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    Flowers of spikes of purple-blue tubes ending in two open lips, the lower lip having a white blotch, blooming for months from July to September, if deadheaded

    Size: 2-3’ x 12-18"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Reblooms if deadhead after 1st flush of flowers
    Native: NY to WI, Georgia to TX, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant. Its nectar feeds small butterflies, Bumblebees and Hummingbirds.

    The name Scutellaria is from Latin scutella meaning a small dish or saucer referring to the shape of the persistent calyx, a covering at the flower’s base. Incana means grey referring to the tiny hairs on stems and undersides of leaves giving a greyish color. Named by Johann Friedrich Theodor Biehler, German botanist from the plant specimens in Christian Sprengel’s (1750-1816) herbarium in 1807. How did German botanist Sprengel, who never set foot in America, come to have a pressed specimen of this native American plant? Sprengel and German botanist Carl Ludwig Willdenow (1765-1812) were close collaborators. Another German botanist Heinrich Ernst Muhlenberg (1753-1815), living in Lancaster Pennsylvania, sent many American plants specimens to Willedenow. Scutellaria incana is native to and grows in what is now called Muhlenberg Meadow in Lancaster County PA. These connections make it likely that the specimen Biehler saw came from Henry Muhlenberg.

  • Senna hebecarpa syn. Cassia hebecarpa Wild senna Z 4-8

    6” long taxicab yellow racemes in July – August

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    6 inch long taxicab yellow racemes in July – August

    Size: 4’ x 2-6’
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained soil
    Native: all North America east of Mississippi River from Hudson Bay south to Georgia and Tennessee, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies, birds & hummingbirds

    Collected by 1753. Very similar to Senna marilandica except a bit taller, flowers prettier and a slightly bulbous gland as the base of the petiole.

  • Silene regia Royal catchfly Z 5-8

    True crimson stars, brighter than a stop light

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    True crimson stars, brighter than a stop light, in July – September, from the prairies.

    Size: 2-3’ x 1-2’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: from Ohio to Alabama W. to Nebraska, WI native
    Wildlife Value: hummingbird favorite.

    In Greek mythology Silene was a companion of Bacchus who was covered with foam. French plant hunter Andre Michaux may have been the 1st to collect this c. 1800. Grown from seed collected by English planthunter Thomas Nuttall (1786-1859) near St. Louis on the Mississippi River c. 1812.

  • Silphium laciniatum Compass plant Z 4-9

    Tall, sunflower-like plant with big, deeply lobed, hairy leaves, that move north and south to follow mid-day sun. Two to five inch wide, sunny-yellow daisies grow at intervals along the top half of the stiff, square, sticky stem from mid-summer into fall.  

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    Tall, sunflower-like plant with big, deeply lobed, hairy leaves, that move north and south to follow mid-day sun. Two to five inch wide, sunny-yellow daisies grow at intervals along the top half of the stiff, square, sticky stem from mid-summer into fall.

     

    Size: sun to part shade in moist to well-drained soil with its deep taproot
    Care: 6- 12’ x 24”
    Native: East and central U.S. as far west as the Great Plains, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: pollinated by bumblebees, Miner bees, large leaf Cutting and solitary bees, Goldfinches feast on the seeds in fall.
    Awards: Missouri Botanic Garden Plant of Merit

    Natives chewed the plant’s sap like chewing gum.  Lakota Sioux made an infusion of the plant is used to deworm horses and humans of and to break up congestion in the lungs.  Grew in Bartram’s colonial nursery by 1770’s.  Grown at America’s 1st botanic garden, Elgin Botanic Garden 1811.

    Named “Compass plant” for its leaves move, facing north and south.

  • Silphium perfoliatum Cup plant Z 3-9

    Golden daisies waive at the sun from July to September, its cup shaped leaves hold water where butterflies drink & bathe

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    Golden daisies waive at the sun from July to September, its cup shaped leaves hold water where butterflies drink & bathe

    Can not ship to: Connecticut and New York

    Size: 7’ x 3’
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist soil
    Native: Central North America, native to Wisconsin.
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit

    Sap used by Native Americans to chew and freshen breath.  Also used to cure colds, neuralgia, fever, and liver disorders.  The Chippewa used to stop lung hemorrhaging, menstrual bleeding and cure chest pain.  The Winnebago drank a potion from the plant to purify themselves before a buffalo hunt. For the Iroquois it cured paralysis, prevented children from seeing ghosts and illness caused by the dead.  Lakota Sioux: “Children sometimes use the resin as chewing gum. An infusion of the whole plant is used to rid horses and humans of intestinal worms. An infusion of the leaves is used to loosen phlegm in the lungs. Described and classified in 1753.

  • Sisyrinchium angustifolium Blue eyed grass Z 3-9

    Cutest petite iris-like foliage sporting blue saucer-shaped flowers with bright yellow stamens in summer.

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Cutest petite iris-like foliage sporting blue saucer-shaped flowers with bright yellow stamens in summer.

    Size: 12" x 6"
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil
    Native: North America, Wisconsin native.

    In cultivation by 1732. Named by Philip Miller, gardener of the Chelsea Botanic Garden, in Gardeners’ Dictionary .
    Mahuna Indians of So. California made a tea from the entire plant to expel stomach worms.

  • Solidago caesia syn. Solidago axillaris Blue-stemmed goldenrod, Wreath goldenrod Z 4-9

    Graceful, arching wands of clustered gold, with contrasting blue-green stems in September-October. One of the last perennials to bloom. Clump forming, noninvasive perennial.

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    Graceful, arching wands of clustered gold, with contrasting blue-green stems, in September-October. Clump forming, noninvasive perennial.

    Size: 18-24” x 16-20”
    Care: part shade to shade in well-drained soil, drought tolerant
    Native: Nova Scotia to WI, south to FL and west to TX, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: With both nectar and pollen this attracts, bees, wasps and flies. It is host to caterpillars of some moths.

    The Latin name is a combination of solidus and ago, meaning “I make whole”, referring to its historic medicinal uses. According to William Cullina it has antioxidant, diuretic, astringent and antifungal properties and was used to treat urinary tract and yeast infections, sore throats and diarrhea. (W. Cullina, NEWFS, p. 197) Named by Swedish botanist Linnaeus in 1753.

  • Solidago riddellii syn. Oligoneuron riddellii Riddell’s goldenrod, Stiff goldenrod Z 3-7

    Sunshine yellow dome-topped flowers Sept.- Oct. Differs from S. gramnifolia by fewer leaves and its leaves fold toward the center vein.

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    Sunshine yellow dome-topped flowers Sept.- Oct. Differs from S. gramnifolia by fewer leaves and its leaves fold toward the center vein.

    Size: 3’x2’
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil.
    Native: swath down middle of No. Am. From Hudson Bay to AK, incl. Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Loved by butterflies for its nectar – Small copper, Monarch, Giant swallowtail, Gray hairstreak, Clouded Sulphur, Fritillary, Pearl crescent, & Cloudless sulphur. Attracts praying mantises. Resists deer.

    The name Solidago from solidus and ago meaning to bring together. First published by German botanist Joseph Frank who named it riddellii in honor of John Riddell who had collected it in Ohio before 1835.