Wisconsin Native

Showing 45–48 of 109 results

  • Dodecatheon meadia Shooting Star Z 4-8 Ephemeral

    White reflexed flowers

    $8.25/pot

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    White reflexed flowers, looking like a descending schuttlecock, dangle from stems on this spring ephemeral.

    Size: 12-24” x 6-1'
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained soil.
    Native: PA to Wisconsin, south to TX.
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Name Dodecatheon from the Greek dodeka (twelve) and theos (gods), meaning 12 superior gods, after the name given to another plant by Roman author, Pliny the Elder. The species name meadia after Richard Mead, physician to George III. Transported from its native America by John Tradescant the Younger to England by 1640. “A favorite among old border flowers.” William Robinson, 1899.

  • Echinacea pallida Pale purple coneflower Z 4-8

    Narrow, weeping pink rays surround rusty hedgehog cone

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Narrow, drooping, rosy-pink rays surround rusty hedgehog cone in early summer

    Size: 14" x 2'
    Care: Full sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: much of continental US east of Colorado, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies, seed heads provide bird food

    Echinacea is Greek meaning “hedgehog” referring to the bristly conehead.  Indians (Cheyenne, Crow, Dakota & Sioux) used this native plant to cure numerous ailments – arthritis, rheumatism, burns, colds, boils, fever, sore mouths, throats & gums, toothaches, snakebites, headaches, stings and distemper in horses.  First collected for gardens by Englishman Thomas Nuttall (1786-1859) who searched much of North America for plants – the Atlantic to the Pacific, Canada to Florida and Hawaii.

  • Echinacea purpurea Purple coneflower Z 3-8

    Iconic dark pink rays with orange-rust cones from mid-summer to fall  

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    $10.95/bareroot

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    Iconic dark pink rays with orange-rust cones from mid-summer to fall

     

    Size: 3’ x 18”
    Care: sun in well-drained humusy soil
    Native: MI S. to Louisiana, incl. Wisconsin
    Wildlife Value: Attracts many butterfly species in the summer. In winter Gold finches feast on the seeds.

    American Indians used Purple coneflower as a remedy for more ailments than any other plant, e.g. smoke treatment to cure headaches and sexually transmitted diseases, applied topically to toothaches and mumps and juice used for burns. The Winnebagos used the plant in advance to protect against burns. Also used to cure distemper in horses.   Introduced into garden cultivation by John Tradescant the Younger in 1640.

  • Epilobium angustifolium syn. Chamaenerion angustifolium Fireweed Z 2-7

    Bright pink to lilac purple flowers June-September atop red stems covered in willow-like leaves

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    Bright pink to lilac purple flowers June-September atop red stems covered in willow-like leaves

    Size: 2-6’ x 3’ spreading
    Care: Sun to part shade in dry to moist well drained soil
    Native: Circum-polar to the temperate northern hemisphere (Wisconsin native)
    Wildlife Value: Attracts hummingbirds, bees, butterflies and other pollinators. Host for Fireweed Clearwing moth & Nessus Sphinx moth.

    Common name comes from its quick reappearance after a wildfire. First Nations used fireweed externally for burns and other skin conditions, and drank a tea for gastro-intestinal and bronchial problems. Its shoots eaten as a vegetable and young leaves added to salads. Fireweed yields a honey so prized that some Canadian beekeepers drive – or even fly – their hives to areas rich in fireweed for the blossoming season.