Our Plants

Showing 1–8 of 616 results

  • Abeliophyllum distichum White forsythia, Korean Abelea-leaf Z. 5-8

    Swan white, open cone-like blooms, each petal splitting then terminating with a notch, cascade along stems in very early spring, almond fragrance.

    $16.25/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

    Buy

    Swan white, open cone-like blooms, each petal splitting then terminating with a notch, cascade along stems in very early spring, almond fragrance.

     

    Size: 3-5’ x 3-4’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil. Flowers bloom on old wood so prune right after flowering.
    Native: central Korea, where it is now nearly extinct. This is the sole species in this genus.
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit in 1937 and RHS First Class Certificate in 1944.

    1st collected by Japanese botanist Takenoshin Nakai (1882-1952) before 1919.  Nakai, professor, author, scholar and official botanist for Korea in 1910 after Japan annexed Korea following the Sino-Japanese and Russo-Japanese wars. There he explored the botanically unknown mountains and forests and introduced its plants to the world through his international contacts and his authorship of Flora Koreana.  Abeliophyllum means leaves like an Abelia, a different shrub. In America’s Arnold Arboretum by 1924.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Acanthus spinosus Bear’s breeches Z 5-9

    two-toned spikes of purple & lavender bracts

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    A WOW plant. Bodacious two-toned spikes of purple & lavender bracts, June to August. Even its leaves are attractive, glossy, deeply incised. Both flowers and leaves have thorny tips.

    LIMITED QUANTITIES AVAILABLE, LIMIT OF 1 PER CUSTOMER PLEASE.

    Size: 3-4' x 2-3'
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil.
    Native: Italy & Turkey

    Acanthus means “thorn” and spinosus means “spine” referring to the leaves. Grown since at least 5th century B.C. Inspiration for Corinthian column capital in architecture of ancient Greece and Rome

  • Acer pseudosieboldianum  Z 4-8   Korean maple

    Small tree or large shrub. Medium to dark green leaves (to 5” long) with 9 doubly serrate lobes, Purple flowers bloom in corymbs in spring.  Excellent shades of amber, carrot and garnet in fall. Appears like Japanese maples or Fullmoon maple but hardier.

    $19.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

    Buy

    Small tree or large shrub. Medium to dark green leaves (to 5” long) with 9 doubly serrate lobes, Purple flowers bloom in corymbs in spring.  Excellent shades of amber, carrot and garnet in fall. Appears like Japanese maples or Fullmoon maple but hardier.

    Size: 15-25’ x 15-25’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil. Site out of wind.
    Native: Eastern Asia

    Pseudo means false referring to the similarity of this to Acer sieboldianum. Korean maple is sometimes commonly called purplebloom maple in reference to its flower color.
    First described in 1886 in German journal Botanische Jahrbücher für Systematik, Pflanzengeschichte und Pflanzengeographie 7(2): 199–200.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Achillea clypeolata Balkan yarrow

    Erect, fern-like clumps of striking silver foliage. Mustard yellow platter flowers in summer.

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK – EMAIL FOR AVAILABILITY

    Erect, fern-like, thick clumps of striking silver foliage. Mustard yellow platter flowers in summer. I first saw this plant at the harbor garden in Port Washington about 6 AM one fall morning. The foliage was so arresting it stopped me in my tracks.

    Size: 18" x 24"
    Care: sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil. Deer and drought tolerant
    Native: Balkans

    Collected before 1804. The Balkan yarrow is known to attract butterflies with its Yellow Flowers.

  • Achillea filipendulina Fernleaf Yarrow Z 3-9

    June-July clumps of mustardy yellow platters on erect stems

    $12.75/bareroot

    Buy

    June-July clumps of mustardy yellow platters on erect stems

    Size: 3’-4’ x 30”
    Care: Full sun. Dry, well-drained soil. Heat and drought tolerant, stands up to wind.
    Native: Caucasus, Iran, Afganistan.
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant.

    Achillea named for Achilles, hero of Homer’s Iliad, used Achillea millefolium to stop bleeding of his wounded soldiers at the siege of Troy.  Achilles learned about the uses of Achillea from Chiron, the Centaur. A. filipendulina collected by French explorer and botanist Joseph Tournefort (1656-1708) in the Levant c. 1700.

  • Achillea ptarmica ‘The Pearl’ Sneezewort, Shirtbuttons Z 3-9

    Spring - summer frilly, white “shirtbuttons”

    $9.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Spring – summer frilly, white “shirtbuttons”

    LIMITED QUANTITES AVAILABLE, LIMIT OF 1 PER CUSTOMER PLEASE.

    Size: 12-36”x 24”
    Care: Full sun, well-drained to moist well-drained soil.
    Native: North temperate regions

    Ptarmica is Greek for sneeze because this plant used for snuff.   English brides carried this at their weddings and called the plant “Seven years’ love.”  Cultivated in Europe since the Middle Ages and in the U.S. since the 1700’s. The double form grown in English gardens by 1597. Philip Miller (1768) referred to this as “double Maudlin.” “The Pearl” described in the May 1905 edition of The Garden as “probably giving more satisfaction than any other white-flowered hardy perennial. The Pearl is a pearl indeed.”

  • Achillea tomentosa Woolly yarrow Z 4-8

    Lemony colored platter-like flower heads from June to July atop a spray of wooly foliage.

    $9.95/pot

    Buy

    Lemony colored platter-like flower heads from June to July atop a spray of wooly foliage.

    LIMITED QUANTITES AVAILABLE, LIMIT OF 1 PER CUSTOMER PLEASE.

    Size: 8” x 12”
    Care: Full sun in moist to dry soil
    Native: Southern to Eastern Europe
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Grown in garden of Tradescant the Elder’s (1570-1638) in 1630. ”A splendid plant with fern like foliage and rich golden-yellow flower heads.” H.H. Thomas, 1915.  Philip Miller’s The Gardener’s Dictionary, describes this as having “finely cut” leaves with flowers “of a bright yellow colour, and continue long in beauty.” (1768)
    Achillea named for Achilles, hero of Homer’s Iliad, who used a different  Achillea to stop his soldiers’ bleeding at the siege of Troy.  Tomentosa means “furry” or “covered in hairs”,  referring to the leaves of this plant.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Achlys triphylla Vanilla leaf, Sweet after death Z 5-9

    A foot tall stem holds one large leaf divided into three, fan-shaped leaflets with deeply scalloped edges laying flat like a dinner plate. From spring to mid-summer an erect, white spike, not made of flowers, but made of stamens (the male part of plants that holds pollen) blooms.

    Placeholder

    $13.95/bareroot

    Buy

    A foot tall stem holds one large leaf divided into three, fan-shaped leaflets with deeply scalloped edges laying flat like a dinner plate. From spring to mid-summer an erect, white spike, not made of flowers, but made of stamens (the male part of plants that holds pollen) blooms.

    Size: 8-16" x spreading by roots.
    Care: shade to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: mountains of the western US and Canadian coast up to nearly 5000’

    Natives of the Pacific Northwest used this medicinally to treat tuberculosis, cataracts, and induce vomiting,    They also washed their hair with it and as an insecticide to repel or kill mosquitos, bedbugs and lice on sheep,
    Both common names describe the sweet smell of its dried foliage.  Collected by “Archibald Menzies on the west coast of North America.”  Menzies (1754-1842) sailed on the Vancouver Expedition collecting many plants in 1787-1788.  Cyclopedia or Universal Dictionary of Arts. Sciences, and Literature v. 20, p.   (1812) where Sir James Edward Smith described and named it Loentic tripylla means Lion’s-leaf. Tripylla means three fruits. Renamed later.