Our Plants

Showing 9–16 of 569 results

  • Acinos alpinus syn. Calamintha alpina syn Clinopodium alpinus

    Reddish purple flowers all summer and fall

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    Reddish purple flowers bloom on cushions all summer and fall – “long and late season of bloom.” Foster

    Size: 4-6”x 8”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: European mountains - Alps and Pyrenees

    Collected before 1753.
    Common name for its aromatic foliage. It has been used to reduce excessive sweating and fever.  Also, leaves may be brewed for tea.

  • Actaea pachypoda syn. Actaea alba White baneberry Z 3-8

    Short white spike flowers in June, conspicuous white berries in fall with a black dot on showy crimson stems.

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    Short white spike flowers in June, conspicuous white berries in fall with a black dot on showy crimson stems.

    Size: 36”x 18-24”
    Care: part to full shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: native to eastern and central No. America; Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: deer resistant
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit and Great Plant Pick Award from Elizabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden.

    Actaea is Latin meaning “elder,” the leaves resembling the elder tree. Pachypoda means thick foot referring to the stalk. The common name “baneberry” chosen because the berries are poisonous. The Blackfoot boiled the roots to cure coughs and colds. In the 1800’s, used to cure “reflex uterine headache, rheumatism, congestion in the female especially, debility and gastralgia.” Sent to England before 1768, Philip Miller.

  • Adenophora lilifolia Ladybells Z 3-8

    Fragrant, flared, downfacing bluebells

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Fragrant, flared, downfacing bluebells in midsummer, July and August

    Size: 18" x 12" spreader
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: central Europe east to Siberia

    Adenophora is Greek from aden meaning “gland” and phore meaning “to bear.” Japanese cultivated this for edible root. “Fragrant blue flowers, freely borne on a loose pyramidal inflorescence.” H.H. Thomas, 1915. “Well suited for the mixed border.” William Robinson, 1899.

  • Adiantum pedatum Maidenhair fern Z 4-9

    Grown for its delicate leaflets arranged in rows. One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated 94 (2013)

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    Grown for its delicate leaflets arranged in rows. One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated 94 (2013)

    Size: 12-24”x 12”
    Care: Shade in moist soil
    Native: all parts of No. America including Wisconsin
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Adiantum is from Greek adiantos, unwettable because its fronds repel water.
    Cherokee made a tea for flu, fever and rheumatism, and powdered parts for heart ailments, paralysis and asthma. Native Americans made a hair wash from the stems and applied a topical poultice of masticated fronds to a wound to arrest bleeding. 1st described by French botanist Cornu (1635). Introduced to France from Canada where it grew in “such quantities that the French send it from thence in package for other goods and the apothecaries at Paris use it for (another Adiantum) in all their compositions in which that is ordered.” Philip Miller (1768). Tradescant the Younger introduced this fern to garden cultivation when he sent it to England around 1638. English herbalist Nicholas Culpepper claimed it to be “a good remedy for coughs, asthmas, pleurisy, etc., and on account of it’s being a gentle diuretic also in jaundice, gravel and other impurities of the kidneys.” Father of the mixed perennial border, William Robinson, called this “elegant.” It “is unquestionably one of the most distinct and beautiful of the hardy ferns.” The Garden 1876.

  • Adiantum venustum Himalayan maidenhair fern Z 5-8

    Black stems hold triangular, delicate, lacy fronds of tiny leaflets

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    Black stems hold triangular, delicate, lacy fronds of tiny leaflets.  Favorite short fern.

    Size: 6" x 12", slow spreader
    Care: part or light shade in moist well-drained soil but tolerates any soil
    Native: China and Himalayan Mountains
    Awards: Great Plant Pick from Elisabeth Cary Miller Botanic Garden & Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    Adiantum is from Greek adiantos, “unwettable” because its fronds repel water. Venustum means attractive in Latin. (We think it should be “venustumest” for most attractive.) Collected for gardens by 1841.

  • Adlumia fungosa Allegheny vine, Climbong fumitory, Bleeding heart vine Biennial Z 4-8

    Dangling pink to white  Bleeding heart-like flowers bloom all summer,June-September. Fern-like foliage on twining stems

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    Dangling pink to white  Bleeding heart-like flowers bloom all summer,June-September. Fern-like foliage on twining stems

    Size: 6-10’ x 12”
    Care: part shade to shade in moist to moist well-drained, acidic soil
    Native: Nova Scotia to No. Carolina west to Minnesota Wisconsin native status-special concern
    Wildlife Value: attracts bumblebees

    Named for John Adium (1759-1836), surveyor, judge and planter on 200 acre farm in Georgetown.
    1st described in 1789 (Aiton, Vol. 3 Hortus Kewensis).

  • Aethionema cordifolia Lebanon stonecress Persian candytuft Z 4-8

    Short subshrub with lovely, tiny blue-green leaves on upright stems with terminal clusters of pale pink blooms in spring. Perfect for rock gardens and front of the border.

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    Aethionema cordifolia  Lebanon stonecress, Persian candytuft   Z 4-8
    Short subshrub with lovely, tiny blue-green leaves on upright stems with terminal clusters of pale pink blooms in spring. Perfect for rock gardens and front of the border.

    Size: 6-8” x 12-15”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil. Sheer back after blooming to keep compact and rebloom.
    Native: Lebanon and possibly Caucasus on chalky summits.

    Collected before 1841. Foster: “…when planted in quantity does wonders for mass effect in the rock garden or alpine lawn.” January 1876 issue of The Garden called these “very attractive dwarf rock garden plants.” Aethionema from aitho meaning scorch and nema for filament.

  • Aethionema grandiflorum Persian stonecress Z 5-8

    Bushy, low growing perennial with blue-green leaves and spikes of fragrant pink to lavender flowers, June-July

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    Bushy, low growing perennial with blue-green leaves and spikes of fragrant pink to lavender flowers, June-July

    Size: 6-12” x 12-18”
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Iran, Iraq, Caucasus, Turkey
    Wildlife Value: attracts honeybees & other pollinators, Deer & Rabbit resistant.
    Awards: Award of Garden Merit from the Royal Horticultural Society

    Short-lived perennial, but self-seeds where happy. Described in 1849 by Pierre Edmond Boissier and Rudolph Friedrich Hohenacker.