Annual Flowers

Showing 1–4 of 6 results

  • Asclepias curassavica Bloodflower or scarlet milkweed Z 9-11 Annual in colder areas

    Small scarlet red and orange umbels all summer and early fall

    $6.45/4" tallpot

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    Asclepias curassavica  Bloodflower or scarlet milkweed  Z 9-11 Annual in colder areas
    Asclepias curassavica grows upright and tall with spiraling lance-shaped leaves.  Blooming all summer and early fall. Showy flowers, in small scarlet red and orange umbels.

    Size: 24-30” x 12-24”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: South America
    Wildlife Value: Attracts Monarch butterflies

    In gardens since 1750’s.    

  • Cynara cardunculus Cardoon Z 7-9

    Spectacular basal foliage - arching, silvery, deeply incised leaves, Late summer-fall spiny buds open to rich purple feathery flowers.

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    Cynara cardunculus   Cardoon  Z 7-9  in colder areas grow as annual
    Spectacular basal foliage – arching, silvery, deeply incised leaves. Late summer-fall spiny buds open to rich purple feathery flowers.

    Size: 3-4’ x 3-4’
    Care: sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Cut off flowers immediately after flowering to bring on new foliage, gorgeous into late fall.
    Native: Southern Europe

    The leaf stems, blanched, are also edible. Bridgemen, The Young Gardeners Assistant (1847)
    Described by Linneaus 1753.

  • Dahlia ‘Bishop of Llandaff’ Tender perennial

    Fiery red, sem-double flowers atop reliably purple foliage from July until frost,

    $7.25/bareroot

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    Dahlia ‘Bishop of Llandaff’ Tender perennial
    Fiery red, sem-double flowers atop reliably purple foliage from July until frost

    Size: 2-3’ x 12”
    Care: moist well drained soil in full sun – lift bulb in fall, overwinter in basement
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit – 1928.

    Dahlias originally grown as food by Aztecs. 1st collected for the West by Spaniards in Mexico in 1615. The genus named after Dr. Anders Dahl, a student of Linnaeus and later a Swedish botanist in his own right. This cultivar came from a batch of chance seedlings in the nursery of breeder Fred Treseder in Wales UK. Treseder offered this and a few others to Bishop Joshua Hughes of Llandaff in 1924.

  • Euphorbia marginata self-seeding ANNUAL

    Clean white variegated leaves and flowers, very showy midsummer to fall.

    $6.25/4" tallpot

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    Euphorbia marginata   self-seeding ANNUAL
    Clean white variegated leaves and flowers, very showy midsummer to fall.

    Size: 18” x 10”
    Care: sun moist well-drained soil, drought tolerant.
    Native: Plains from Dakota to Texas
    Size: Wonderful cut flower just be careful of the milky sap.

    Discovered on Lewis and Clark expedition.  A “most elegant species.” Breck, 1851.