"New" Heirloom Plants

Showing 1–8 of 19 results

  • Clematis columbiana v. tenuiloba syn. C. alpina v. occidentalis sub. var. tenuiloba Rock clematis Z 3-8

    Deep violet elongated bells in early summer on short erect stems, only 6” high

    $12.95/pot

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    Deep violet elongated bells in early summer on short erect stems, only 6” high

    Size: 6" x 12"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Rocky Mountains & the Dakotas

    1st described in 1881 by Harvard botanist Asa Gray

  • Cortusa matthiola Alpine bells Z 4-9

    Demure purple, drooping bells atop a short scape arising from a low carpet of foliage in May-June.

    $9.25/bareroot

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    Demure purple, drooping bells atop a short scape arising from a low carpet of foliage in May-June.

    Size: 9” x 10”
    Care: shade to part shade in moist soil
    Native: Alps

    Discovered in a valley near Vincenza Italy in the foothills of the eastern Alps by Padua botany professor J.A. Cortusus. His friend Mattioli (1500-1577) named it for him and the species was named for Mattioli.  According to Mattioli women used the leaves to color their cheeks pink: “the leaves applied to the cheeks, and shortly removed, occasion a beautiful colour, resembling that from the finest rouge. . .” Gerard grew this in London in the 1590’s but it was “at all times rare.”    Profiled in 1807 in Curtis’ Botanical Magazine, plate 987

  • Corydalis sempervirens syn. Capnoides sempervirens Rock harlequin, Fumitory Z 5-7

    Pink and yellow bicolor from spring to summer

    $8.25/bareroot

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    RESEEDING SHORT-LIVED PERENNIAL

    Pink and yellow bicolor from spring to summer

    Size: 10-12” x 10-12”
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist well drained soil
    Native: from Nova Scotia west to Alaska, south to North Carolina

    Corydalis is Greek for “lark” korydalos, referring to the shape of flower resembling a lark’s spur.    Cultivated in American gardens before 1900. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Draba aizoides Yellow Whitlow grass Z 3-8

    Small bun-shaped tuft of evergreen foliage bearing upright clusters of bright yellow flowers in early to mid-spring.

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    $7.25/pot

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    Small bun-shaped tuft of evergreen foliage bearing upright clusters of bright yellow flowers in early to mid-spring.

    Size: 2-4” x 6-8”
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil.
    Native: Europe

    Before 1767, Linnaeus

  • Dryopteris filix-mas ‘Parsley’ Male fern Z 4-8

    Spring fiddleheads are followed by crinkled ferny leaves resembling parsley on arching stems on this small fern.

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    $9.25/bareroot

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    Spring fiddleheads are followed by crinkled ferny leaves resembling parsley on arching stems on this small fern.

    Size: 2’ x 2’
    Care: shade to part sun in moist well-drained soil, tolerates clay
    Native: Europe and North America
    Wildlife Value: provides shelter and habitat for birds and bees, Deer & rabbit Resistant

    Dryopteris filix-mas collected before 1834, Victorian cultivar.

  • Gentiana gracilipes Kansu gentian, Grass-leaved gentian Z 4-8

    Trumpet-shaped Purple-blue flowers with white centers cluster on trailing stems with lance shaped leaves from July – September

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Trumpet-shaped Purple-blue flowers with white centers cluster on trailing stems with lance shaped leaves from July – September

    Size: 6-12” x 12-15”
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: NW China

    Collected by 1915.

  • Heuchera versicolor syn. H. rubescens var. versicolor Pink alumroot Z 4-10

    Tiny pink bells on narrow inflorescence blooming mid to late summer

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    Tiny pink bells on narrow inflorescence blooming mid to late summer

    Size: 8-12” x 12"
    Care: prefers part shade in moist well-drained to well drained soil, can grow in sun with moist soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: southwestern US
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds

    First collected in 1904 on damp, shady bluffs of the Black Range in New Mexico, accd. to Edward Lee Greene.

    The roots are astringent and can also be used as an alum substitute, used in fixing dyes. Was also used medicinally for fever, diarrhea, venereal disease, liver ailments, eyewash, colic and animal care.  Heuchera is named for Johann Heinrich von Heucher (1677-1747), while rubescens means becoming red or reddish, and versicolor means variously colored.

  • Holodiscus discolor Creambush, Ocean spray Z 5-10

    Multistemmed shrub with dense, elegant pyramidal clusters of arching cream-colored flowers in early to mid summer. Leaves tint red in fall.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Multi-stemmed shrub with dense, elegant pyramidal clusters of arching cream-colored flowers in early to mid summer. Leaves tint red in fall.

    Size: 4-8’ x 8’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Montana to Colorado west to the Pacific.
    Wildlife Value: nectar for hummingbirds, food for butterfly caterpillars, bird habitat.

    Hard and durable wood was used to make digging sticks, spears, harpoon shafts, bows, and arrows by nearly all coastal Native groups. A few used the wood to make sticks to barbeque salmon, fish hooks, needles for weaving and knitting, Pegs were made to use like nails. Others made wood intoarmor plating and canoe paddles.
    A few Natives made an infusion of boiled fruit to cure diarrhea, measles, chickenpox and as a blood tonic.  Collected by Meriwether Lewis in today’s Idaho on the Clearwater River, May 29, 1806 en route back east on  the Lewis and Clark Expedition.