"New" Heirloom Plants

Showing 1–4 of 37 results

  • Aconitum napellus Monkshood, Wolfsbane Z 5-8 POISON

    Midsummer, blue spikes of hooded blooms

    Placeholder

    $10.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Aconitum napellus  Monkshood, Wolfsbane             Z 5-8    POISON
    Midsummer, blue spikes of hooded blooms.

    Size: 2-3’x 12”
    Care: part shade, cool, moist soil
    Native: Europe
    Awards: Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden Great Plant Picks

    The name Aconitum is from the mythical hill Aconitus in Pontica where Hercules fought with Cerberus.  The Monkshood reputedly sprang from the jaws of Cerberus, the guard dog of the underworld.  Believed to make a potion that helped witches fly.  Philip Miller in The Gardener’s Dictionary (1768) wrote that the name Aconitum comes from Greek word for dart “because the Barbarians used to daub their darts therewith.” Used by physicians in 1200’s and to poison wolves:  “This Wolf’s bayne of all poisons is the most hastie poison.”  Wm. Turner, 1560’s.  Introduced to the new world by John Winthrop in 1631. Miller wrote “in flower it makes a pretty appearance” so that many people grow it in their gardens.

  • Alcea rosea var. nigra Black hollyhock BIENNIAL Z 4-9

    Early to late summer spikes of single jet-black/maroon platters.  

    Placeholder

    $9.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Alcea rosea var. nigra  Black hollyhock BIENNIAL Z 4-9

    Early to late summer spikes of single jet-black/maroon platters.

     

    Size: 5-8’ x 24”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: West Asia
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and birds

    Hollyhocks have been cultivated in China for thousands of years where it symbolized the passing of time. They cooked the leaves for a vegetable and also ate the buds. Transported from Middle East to Europe by the Crusaders and introduced to England by 1573. Grown in the Eichstätt Garden, the garden of Johann Konrad von Gemmingen, prince bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria, c. 1600. Culpepper, a 17th century English herbalist, claimed the plant could be used to cure ailments of the “belly, Stone, Reins, Kidneys, Bladder, Coughs, Shortness of Breath, Wheesing, … the King’s Evil,, Kernels, Chin-cough, Wounds, Bruises, Falls. . . (and) Sun-burning.” Both single and double forms grew in England by the time of Parkinson (1629). Parkinson said they came “in many and sundry colours.” John Winthrop Jr. introduced the 1st hollyhock to the New World in the 1630’s.

    In the 1880’s Mr. W. Charter of Saffron Walden in England cultivated frilly doubles, now known as ‘Charter’s Doubles.’

  • Allium christophii syn. Allium albopilosum Star of Persia, Persian onion Z 4-8

    Awesome purple globe-shaped flowers nearly a foot across in late spring to early summer. Ephemeral. Flowerhead make stunning years long dried arrangements

    Placeholder

    $5.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Allium christophii  syn. Allium albopilosum     Star of Persia, Persian onion Z 4-8
    Awesome purple globe-shaped flowers nearly a foot across in late spring to early summer. Ephemeral. Flowerhead make stunning years long dried arrangements

    Size: 1-2’ x 1’
    Care: sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Iran and Turkey
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant. Walnut tolerant
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society award of Garden Merit

    Named Star of Persia for the 100 star shaped flowers that make up each flower head.
    Described by German botanist and plant explorer Ernst Rudolf von Trautvetter (1809-1889) in 1884. He worked at botanic gardens and universities in Kiev and St. Petersburg for 40 years.

  • Allium karataviense Turkestan onion, Kara Tau garlic Z 5-9

    Basal rosette of wide, glaucous, arching leaves from which a soft-ball sized soft pink to white flower emerges in early summer, ephemeral

    Placeholder

    $7.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Allium karataviense Turkestan onion, Kara Tau garlic Z 5-9
    Basal rosette of wide, glaucous, arching leaves from which a soft-ball sized soft pink to white flower emerges in early summer, ephemeral

    Size: 9” x 6”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: central Asia – the Stans (Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Afghanistan).
    Wildlife Value: value: resistant to rabbits & deer. Attracts bees and butterflies
    Awards: Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanic Garden Great Plant Pick, Royal Botanic Garden Award of Garden Merit

    1st described in 1875 by German botanist Eduard August von Regel (1815-1892) who served as the Director of the Imperial Botanical Garden of St. Petersburg Russia