"New" Heirloom Plants

Showing 57–62 of 62 results

  • Symphoricarpos albus Snowberry Z 3-7

    Small pink bell-shaped flowers turn into copious clusters of round, white berries, like miniature snowballs, grace this shrub from late summer through winter.

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    $16.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Small pink bell-shaped flowers turn into copious clusters of round, white berries, like miniature snowballs, grace this shrub from late summer through winter.

    Size: 3-6’ x 3-6’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Canada east to west coasts; US all states north from Virginia to California. Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: deer tolerant, attracts numerous birds including Hummingbirds, Towhees, Grouses, Robins, and Waxwings for nesting and food, although the fruit is poison to humans. Bees flock to the flowers’ pollen. Host for caterpillars of the Snowberry Sphinx moth and Snowberry Clearwing moth.

    Pauites of Oregon constructed cradle boards with the wood, sharpened the stem for digging tool and used its branches in a game of dice.  The Nez Perce boiled sticks in water then used to remedy fevers, and encircled its branches around cradleboards to protect babies from ghosts. Flathead cured injured eyes with juice for the fruit and made a paste of its fruit, bark and leaves to remedy skin ailments and burns. For the Blackfoot the smoke from burning twigs blackened newly made pipes. Sioux made a diauretic from the fruit.  Ojibwa speeded up convalescence for new mothers after giving birth with water infused with this. Shoshone made arrows from shoots for small birds.  Collected for botany before 1753. Also collected on Lewis and Clark Expedition along the Missouri River west of Council Bluffs.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Symphyandra zanzegura syn Campanula zanzegura   Ring bellflower, Rock bellflower    Z 5-10

    Flared lilac bells hang from wiry stems all summer.  Self-sows.

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    $10.25/bareroot

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    Flared petal ends of lilac bells on wiry red stems over soft, velvety leaves persist much of summer

     

    Size: 15” x 15”
    Care: full to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: mountains of Armenia, Eastern Europe
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees

    Described and published by Ukrainian botanist Vladimir Lipsky (1863-1937) in 1894. Reclassified as a Campanula in 1980.

  • Thalictrum coriaceum  Maid of the Mist Z 5-7

    Broad panicle of white flowers with maroon-colored filaments and tips of stigma flowering May to June

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    Broad panicle of white flowers with maroon-colored filaments and tips of stigma flowering May to June

    Size: 3-5’ x 2’
    Care: sun to shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Uncommon, central and southern Appalachian endemic, Pennsylvania to northern Georgia west to West Virginia and Tennessee, primarily in the mountains

    First described in 1891 in “Torrey Bot. Club” 18:363, 1891. Collected on Rock Table and Stone Mountains in North Carolina in 1891 by J.K. Small (1869-1938) and A.A. Heller and by “Professor Porter in the same region many years before.”

  • Verbena hastata Blue vervain, Simpler’s joy Z 3-9

    Bright purplish-blue candelabra-like spikes from July to September

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Bright purplish-blue candelabra-like spikes from July to September

    Size: 2-4’ x 2’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist or moist well-drained soil
    Native: eastern 2/3rds of No. America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Cardinals & Sparrows eat the seeds. Food for larvae of Buckeye butterfly.

    Native Americans used plant as remedy for coughs, colds and fever.  Mahuna Indians of So. California used the root to cure complicated stomach fevers.   Sioux fed the seeds to their horses to give them energy.  The Sioux also used it as an insect repellant.  Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Veronica armena Armenian speedwell Z 4-9

    A peewee plant that packs a punch.  In spring to early summer terminal clusters of cup-shaped Vermeer blue flowers made of 4 obovate, smooth-edged petals set off snow white eyes with matching white stamens.  Below the floral crown forest-green, soft, needle-sized leaves frame the blue and detail texture for the rest of the season.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    A peewee plant that packs a punch.  In spring to early summer terminal clusters of cup-shaped Vermeer blue flowers made of 4 obovate, smooth-edged petals set off snow white eyes with matching white stamens.  Below the floral crown forest-green, soft, needle-sized leaves frame the blue and detail texture for the rest of the season.

    Size: 4” x 6” and spreading
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Armenia, Georgia and Turkey

    Discovered before 1856 when it was named and described by Swiss explorer and botanist Pierre Edmond Boissier.

  • Zauschneria garetii syn Epilobium canum ssp. garrettii Hummingbird trumpet, California fuchsia, Garrett’s Firechalice Z 5-9

    Vibrant orange-red tubes in late summer, spreading by root, form a colorful groundcover.

    $12.75/bareroot

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    Vibrant orange-red tubes in late summer, spreading by root, form a colorful groundcover.

    Size: 12” x 18-24”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Kingston Mountains in CA, Utah, Idaho & Wyoming
    Wildlife Value: Attracts hummingbirds, birds and butterflies, Deer and rabbit resistant

    Collected in Utah’s Big Cottonweed Canyon in 1906 by A.O. Garrett (1870-1948), prolific Utah planthunter.