"New" Heirloom Plants

Showing 9–16 of 29 results

  • Draba aizoides Yellow Whitlow grass Z 3-8

    Small bun-shaped tuft of evergreen foliage bearing upright clusters of bright yellow flowers in early to mid-spring.

    $8.25/pot

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    Small bun-shaped tuft of evergreen foliage bearing upright clusters of bright yellow flowers in early to mid-spring.

    Size: 2-4” x 6-8”
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil.
    Native: Europe

    Before 1767, Linnaeus

  • Dryopteris filix-mas ‘Parsley’ Male fern Z 4-8

    Spring fiddleheads are followed by crinkled ferny leaves resembling parsley on arching stems on this small fern.

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    $10.25/bareroot

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    Spring fiddleheads are followed by crinkled ferny leaves resembling parsley on arching stems on this small fern.

    Size: 2’ x 2’
    Care: shade to part sun in moist well-drained soil, tolerates clay
    Native: Europe and North America
    Wildlife Value: provides shelter and habitat for birds and bees, Deer & rabbit Resistant

    Dryopteris filix-mas collected before 1834, Victorian cultivar.

  • Elsholtzia stauntonii  Chinese mint shrub  Z 4-8

    Tube-shaped purple flowers ascend in spires in fall on this subshrub that dies back in colder areas to regrow from the roots in spring. Valuable for its late bloom and fragrant foliage.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Tube-shaped purple flowers ascend in spires in fall on this subshrub that dies back in colder areas to regrow from the roots in spring. Valuable for its late bloom and fragrant foliage.

    Size: 3-5’ x 3-5'
    Care: sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: hills, mountainsides and river banks in Gansu, Hebei, Henan, Shaanxi, Shanxi, China

    Naemd for name Prussian horticultulurist and doctor Johann Sigismund Elsholtz (1623-1688). This species described in 1833.

  • Epilobium angustifolium syn. Chamaenerion angustifolium Fireweed Z 2-7

    Bright pink to lilac purple flowers June-September atop red stems covered in willow-like leaves

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Bright pink to lilac purple flowers June-September atop red stems covered in willow-like leaves

    Size: 2-6’ x 3’ spreading
    Care: Sun to part shade in dry to moist well drained soil
    Native: Circum-polar to the temperate northern hemisphere (Wisconsin native)
    Wildlife Value: Attracts hummingbirds, bees, butterflies and other pollinators. Host for Fireweed Clearwing moth & Nessus Sphinx moth.

    Common name comes from its quick reappearance after a wildfire. First Nations used fireweed externally for burns and other skin conditions, and drank a tea for gastro-intestinal and bronchial problems. Its shoots eaten as a vegetable and young leaves added to salads. Fireweed yields a honey so prized that some Canadian beekeepers drive – or even fly – their hives to areas rich in fireweed for the blossoming season.

  • Gentiana gracilipes Kansu gentian, Grass-leaved gentian Z 4-8

    Trumpet-shaped Purple-blue flowers with white centers cluster on trailing stems with lance shaped leaves from July – September

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Trumpet-shaped Purple-blue flowers with white centers cluster on trailing stems with lance shaped leaves from July – September

    Size: 6-12” x 12-15”
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: NW China

    Collected by 1915.

  • Heuchera versicolor syn. H. rubescens var. versicolor Pink alumroot Z 4-10

    Tiny pink bells on narrow inflorescence blooming mid to late summer

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Tiny pink bells on narrow inflorescence blooming mid to late summer

    Size: 8-12” x 12"
    Care: prefers part shade in moist well-drained to well drained soil, can grow in sun with moist soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: southwestern US
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds

    First collected in 1904 on damp, shady bluffs of the Black Range in New Mexico, accd. to Edward Lee Greene.

    The roots are astringent and can also be used as an alum substitute, used in fixing dyes. Was also used medicinally for fever, diarrhea, venereal disease, liver ailments, eyewash, colic and animal care.  Heuchera is named for Johann Heinrich von Heucher (1677-1747), while rubescens means becoming red or reddish, and versicolor means variously colored.

  • Holodiscus discolor Creambush, Ocean spray Z 5-10

    Multistemmed shrub with dense, elegant pyramidal clusters of arching cream-colored flowers in early to mid summer. Leaves tint red in fall.

    $12.95/bareroot

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    Multi-stemmed shrub with dense, elegant pyramidal clusters of arching cream-colored flowers in early to mid summer. Leaves tint red in fall.

    Size: 4-8’ x 8’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Montana to Colorado west to the Pacific.
    Wildlife Value: nectar for hummingbirds, food for butterfly caterpillars, bird habitat.

    Hard and durable wood was used to make digging sticks, spears, harpoon shafts, bows, and arrows by nearly all coastal Native groups. A few used the wood to make sticks to barbeque salmon, fish hooks, needles for weaving and knitting, Pegs were made to use like nails. Others made wood intoarmor plating and canoe paddles.
    A few Natives made an infusion of boiled fruit to cure diarrhea, measles, chickenpox and as a blood tonic.  Collected by Meriwether Lewis in today’s Idaho on the Clearwater River, May 29, 1806 en route back east on  the Lewis and Clark Expedition.

  • Horminum pyrenaicum   Dragonmouth, Pyrenean Dead-nettle   Z 5-9

    Deep purple salvia-like blooms in April to May above rosettes of wide, flat leaves

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    $11.95/bareroot

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    Deep purple salvia-like blooms late spring to early summer above rosettes of wide, flat leaves

     

    Size: 8-16” x 12” 
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil.  Drought tolerant.
    Native: Pyrenees & Alps
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and birds. Deer and rabbit resistant.

    Before 1753, Linnaeus.