"New" Heirloom Plants

Showing 13–16 of 30 results

  • Holodiscus discolor Creambush, Ocean spray Z 5-10

    Multistemmed shrub with dense, elegant pyramidal clusters of arching cream-colored flowers in early to mid summer. Leaves tint red in fall.

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    $8.25/bareroot

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    Multi-stemmed shrub with dense, elegant pyramidal clusters of arching cream-colored flowers in early to mid summer. Leaves tint red in fall.

    Size: 4-8’ x 8’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Montana to Colorado west to the Pacific.
    Wildlife Value: nectar for hummingbirds, food for butterfly caterpillars, bird habitat.

    Hard and durable wood was used to make digging sticks, spears, harpoon shafts, bows, and arrows by nearly all coastal Native groups. A few used the wood to make sticks to barbeque salmon, fish hooks, needles for weaving and knitting, Pegs were made to use like nails. Others made wood intoarmor plating and canoe paddles.
    A few Natives made an infusion of boiled fruit to cure diarrhea, measles, chickenpox and as a blood tonic.  Collected by Meriwether Lewis in today’s Idaho on the Clearwater River, May 29, 1806 en route back east on  the Lewis and Clark Expedition.

  • Hydrangea petiolaris syn. Hydrangea anomala petiolaris Climbing hydrangea Z 4-8

    Big white lacecap flowers blanket this climbing vine in early summer.

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    Big white lacecap flowers blanket this climbing vine in early summer.

    Size: 40’ x 5-10’
    Care: sun or shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Japan & Korea
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    Collected by German physician and botanist Philipp Franz von Siebold in Japan during his residency on Nagaski working for the Dutch trading post there, 1823-1829. He introduced more then 2000 Japanese plants to Europe.  1st described in Flora Japonica 1839

  • Iris domestica syn. Belamcanda chinensis Blackberry lily Z 5-10

    Orange spotted flowers in summer followed by black seed clusters

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    Orange spotted flowers in summer followed by black seed clusters

    Size: 18-36”x 10”
    Care: sun, moist well drained soil
    Native: China and Japan

    The Blackberry lily was cultivated in China as a medicinal plant as long ago as 120 B.C.  It was introduced to England from China in 1823.  Jefferson grew this at Monticello.
    The root of the Blackberry Lily, Belamcanda chinensis, a member of the Iris family which produces attractive lily-like flowers, is known as the Chinese herb She-gan. Seeds of the plant were collected by Jesuit missionaries in China and sent to Europe by the 1730s. It was cultivated in Linnaeus’  botanical garden in Uppsala by 1748, and in English gardens by at least 1759. The plant was known in American gardens as early as 1825.

  • Iris graminea Grass-leaved iris, Plum-scented iris Z 4-8

    Charming beardless spuria iris of purple styles, violet falls and ivory hafts with purple veins, blooming in June below the gras-like foliage

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Charming beardless spuria iris of purple styles, violet falls and ivory hafts with purple veins, blooming in June below the gras-like foliage

    Size: 9-16” x 9-16”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: from Spain to Russia & Caucasus in Asia. But now endangered in Czechoslovakia and extinct in Germany.
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Graminea means grass. Common name of Plum-scented for its fruity, plum fragrance. In gardens since at least 1568. Planted at Cambridge Botanic Garden in 1733.