"New" Heirloom Plants

Showing 13–16 of 65 results

  • Camassia quamash Wild Hyacinth, Leichtlin’s Camass Z 4-8

    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

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    $7.95/bareroot

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    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

    Size: 15” x 12"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, well-drained soil
    Native: Pacific Northwest
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer & rabbit resistant

    First documented by Lewis & Clark near the Nez Perce village in the Cascade Mountains. Nez Perce hunters gave Clark a cake made with Camassia.  Important food crop for First Americans. Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll 1908.

  • Carex montana Soft-leaved Sedge Z 4-10

    Soft mounding grass with small brown flower spikes March-April

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    Soft mounding grass with small brown flower spikes March-April

    Size: 10” X 10”
    Care: Part sun to shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Europe, Caucasas, West Siberia

    Linnaeus 1753

  • Codonopsis ovata syn. Glosocomia ovata syn. Wahlenbergia roylei Kashmir Bellflower, Bonnet Bellflower Z 3-7

    OUT OF STOCK Codonopsis ovata syn. Glosocomia ovata syn. Wahlenbergia roylei   Kashmir Bellflower, Bonnet Bellflower Z 3-7 Large, single, pendulous, milky-blue bell-shaped flowers flared at the tips. Blooms July-August.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Codonopsis ovata syn. Glosocomia ovata syn. Wahlenbergia roylei   Kashmir Bellflower, Bonnet Bellflower Z 3-7
    Large, single, pendulous, milky-blue bell-shaped flowers flared at the tips. Blooms July-August.

    Size: 15” x 15”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Himalayas, from Pakistan to Kashmir
    Wildlife Value: attracts Bees
    Size: Root is edible (but not tasty) when cooked. It can also be dried and ground into a powder. A famine food, used when all else fails. The roots and leaves have been used in its native areas to make a poultice for the treatment of bruises, ulcers and wounds. Medicinal use published 1895.

    Collected before 1835.

  • Comptonia peregrina Sweet Fern Z 2-6 SHRUB

    Grown for it’s fern like leaves, this small shrub flowers in spring with insignificant yellow flowers followed by brown nutlets. Foliage is fragrant when crushed.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Grown for it’s fern like leaves, this small shrub flowers in spring with insignificant yellow flowers followed by brown nutlets. Foliage is fragrant when crushed.

    Size: 2-5’ x 4’ spreading
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, well-drained to well-drained soil. Prefers acidic, but will grow in other types of soil as well. Drought and salt tolerant.
    Native: Eastern North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies, & birds. Larval host plant for a wide variety of moths, including the Io moth & several Sphinx moth species, and the Anise Swallowtail butterfly. Deer resistant. Nitrogen fixer.

    Genus name honors Henry Compton (1632-1713), Bishop of London and patron of botany.
    Peregrina means exotic or immigrant. Many Native Americans (Algonquin, Cherokee, Chippewa, Delaware, Menominee, Delaware, Potawatomi) used this plant for a wide variety of purposes: Crushed leaves inhaled for headache. Leaf infusions for: round worms, fevers, beverage, blood purifier, blisters, clear mucus from lungs, bladder inflammation, rash from poison ivy, swelling, flux, stomach cramps, itch.   Fragrance leaves- burned or crushed for incense in ceremony, perfume,   Decoction – childbirth, tonic,   Other: sprinkle on medicine to poison enemy, prevent blueberries from spoiling, leaves in fire to make smudge to ward off mosquitoes.
    Collected before 1753.