"New" Heirloom Plants

Showing 9–12 of 26 results

  • Clematis recta ‘Purpurea’ Ground clematis, Flammula clematis POISONOUS Z 3-9

    Fragrant star-shaped white blooms May-July on attractive purple foliage, fading to green by mid-summer.

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    $18.95/bareroot

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    Fragrant star-shaped white blooms May-July on attractive purple foliage, fading to green by mid-summer. Can be trained to climb or left as a groundcover. Handling plant may cause contact dermatitis or allergic reaction

    Size: 3-5' x 2-4'
    Care: sun to part shade with moist well-drained soil. Pinch back buds to maintain purple foliage longer-when plant blooms foliage fades to green.
    Native: Eastern, southern and central Europe.
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds, butterflies & bees; Deer and Black Walnut tolerant

    Recommended for its purple foliage in The Gardens of Gertrude Jekyll.

  • Dianthus sylvestris Woodland pink Z 4-8

    Five, jagged-edged pink petals early summer on this sweet, fragrant flower.

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    $7.25/ea

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    Five, jagged-edged pink petals early summer on this sweet, fragrant flower.

    Size: 10” x 10”
    Care: full sun in dry, well-drained soil
    Native: Moutains of Central & So. Europe

    Bailey wrote: “pretty perennial border plant.”  Collected before 1787.

  • Eupatorium sessilifolium Upland boneset Z 3-8

    Showy flat-topped, white flower clusters July to September, considered rare and endangered

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    $10.95/bareroot

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    Showy flat-topped, white flower clusters July to September, considered rare and endangered

    Size: 3-4’ x 12-24”
    Care: Shade to part shade in moist well-drained soil to dry soil
    Native: most of eastern half of US, Wisconsin native but rare and endangered
    Wildlife Value: Nectar attracts bees and butterflies. Food for caterpillars of several moths. Deer & rabbit resistant.

    Collected before 1753.

  • Geranium phaeum Mourning widow Z 4-8

    Dark maroon flowers with tall, erect anthers, looking like a proboscis, flowers held above foliage spring to early summer & sporatically thereafter

    $11.25/bareroot

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    Dark maroon flowers with tall, erect anthers, looking like a proboscis, flowers held above foliage spring to early summer & sporatically thereafter

    Size: 2- 2 ½ ‘ x 2’
    Care: shade to part shade in moist well drained soil
    Native: Alps and Pyrenees

    Geranium is Greek meaning “crane” referring to the shape of fruit resembling the bill of a crane. In 1629 John Parkinson described the uses of the Cranesbill for: “great wound herbes, and effectual to stay bleedings…[Germans] extoll it wonderfully, for a singular remedy against the stone, both in the reines and bladder.” This species called Mourning widow because of the nearly black flowers. In European gardens by 1500’s.