"New" Heirloom Plants

Showing 9–12 of 65 results

  • Aquilegia vulgaris Columbine, Granny’s bonnet Z 3-10

    May to June purple, blue, pink or white columbines  

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    May to June purple, blue, pink or white columbines

     

    Size: 36”x 18”
    Care: Sun or part shade fertile moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe

    Very ancient plant. Used medicinally in Middle Ages to cure pestilence, measles, small pox and jaundice and remove obstructions of the liver but large doses are poisonous. Aquilegia was mentioned in the literature of Chaucer and Shakespeare. It was a popular Elizabethan (Elizabeth I in the late 1500’s) cottage garden flower. French botanist Tournefort reported that women used the seeds to “drive out the Measles and Small Pox.” John Winthrop introduced this plant to the New World in the 1630’s. White form by 1600’s. Cultivated in America since 1700’s.

  • Artemisia lactiflora White mugwort Z 3-8

    Blooms in plumes of creamy white, resembling an astilbe, above blackish green leaves with silver undersides, August to October

    Placeholder

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Blooms in plumes of creamy white, resembling an astilbe, above blackish green leaves with silver undersides, August to October

    Size: 4-5’ x 1.5-2’
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist, well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: East asia-China
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies & bees. Rabbit and Deer tolerant
    Awards: Recipient of the Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    Genus is named for Artemis, Greek goddess of the moon, wild animals, and hunting. Lactiflora means “milk-white flowers”

    The leaves and flowering stems were used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat menstrual & liver disorders, and anti-inflammatory medicines. In East and Southeast Asia the leaves and tender stems are eaten boiled or stir fried, or in soups.

  • Athyrium filix-femina Lady fern Z 3-8

    Grown for its fern fronds, one of the easiest ferns to grow

    Placeholder

    $10.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Grown for its fern fronds, one of the easiest ferns to grow

    Size: 4’ x 2-4’
    Care: moist to well-drained soil in full to part shade
    Native: temperate No. America including Wisconsin
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Collected before 1780’s. Mentioned by H.H. Thomas 1915 for gardens.

  • Baptisia tinctoria Wild indigo, Horsefly Z. 3-9

    Sweet saffron yellow pea-like flowers, July to September

    Placeholder

    $7.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Sweet saffron yellow pea-like flowers, July to September

    Size: 2-3’ x 2-3’
    Care: sun to part shade in dry to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Ontario, Maine to MN S to GA, Wisconsin
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies.

    Baptisia is Greek meaning “to dye” referring to use of Baptisia australis as a substitute for indigo dye. Tinctoria means used in dying. For Cherokee it induced vomiting. They made a poultice to “stop mortification.” The root, held against teeth, remedied toothache. Iroquois used it to cure rheumatism and cramps in the stomach or legs. The Cherokee & Ojibwa used it for dye. Collected by John Banister in Virginia by 1692. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.