"New" Heirloom Plants

Showing 9–12 of 95 results

  • Amsonia orientalis syn. Rhazya orientalis European bluestar Z 5-8

    Purplish blue flowers that are larger and longer lasting than other Amsonia. Yellow foliage in Fall.

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Amsonia orientalis syn. Rhazya orientalis    European bluestar   Z 5-8
    “Immensely tough and useful filler” “100 Plants Every Gardener Should Grow,” Gardens Illustrated No. 231
    Purplish blue flowers that are larger and longer lasting than other Amsonia. Yellow foliage in Fall.

    Size: 12-20” x spreading
    Care: sun to light shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Turkey

    Deer resistant, salt and heat tolerant.   Classified as critically endangered as it is losing its native habitat and was over harvested. Collected before 1844.

  • Anemone canadensis Meadow anemone PERENNIAL Z. 3-8

    Pristine pure white petal-like sepals frame many golden anthers in early summer

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    $6.95/3" pot

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    Pristine pure white petal-like sepals frame many golden anthers in early summer

    Size: 12-24”x 12”
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist soil
    Native: North America as far south as Missouri, Wisconsin native

    Collected by Meriwether Lewis August 17, 1804 on the 1st leg of the Expedition. Used medicinally by many Indian groups. The roots cleared up sores and leaves stopped nose bleeds for the Chippewa. It relieved the Iroquois of worms and counteracted witch medicine. For the Meskwaki this plant uncrossed crossed eyes. Ojibwa singers used it to clear their throats and remedy lower back pain. The name Anemone is Greek for the wind, “so called, because the flower is supposed not to open, except the wind blows.” The Gardeners’ Dictionary, 1768.

  • Anemone cylindrica Thimbleweed PERENNIAL Z 4-7

    Pristine pure white petal-like sepals frame many golden anthers in June. Erect cylinders persist summer and fall.

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    Pristine pure white petal-like sepals frame many golden anthers in June. Erect cylinders persist summer and fall.

    Size: 2’ x 12”
    Care: full sun to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil.
    Native: on the east – Maine to Delaware & west – British Columbia to Arizona. WI native

    HoChunk put masticated fuzz from the seeds on boils or carbuncles, opening them after a day. Collected from the wild before 1880’s. Plant emits allelopathogin that inhibits seed germination of other plants. Leaves, if eaten, cause mouth irritation, so that critters (rabbits & deer) leave it alone. The name Anemone is Greek for the wind, “so called, because the flower is supposed not to open, except the wind blows.” The Gardeners’ Dictionary, 1768.

  • Anemonella thalictroides Rue anemone, Windflower Z 4-7

    Delicate white to pinkish cups in spring to mid-summer light up woodlands

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    $7.95/3" pot

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    Delicate white to pinkish cups in spring to mid-summer light up woodlands

    Size: 12” x 10”
    Care: part shade in moist well drained soil
    Native: N.H through Ontario to Minn. Including WI, south to Florida & Kansas

    First described by Linnaeus – 1753. Philip Miller grew this in 1768. Named Anemonella because the flowers resemble those of the Amenome and thalictroides because the leaves resemble the leaves of the Thalictrum, Meadowrue. Native Americans ate the tuberous root for food and made a tea from Rue anemone by steeping the root in water. The tea supposedly cured flu-like symptoms of diarrhea and vomiting.