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Showing 33–40 of 585 results

  • Amorpha canescens Lead plant Z 2-9

    Arching violet spikes flower in mid-summer top pinnately compound, grey-green leaves.

    $13.95/bareroot

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    Arching violet spikes flower in mid-summer top pinnately compound, grey-green leaves.  Liberty Hyde Bailey (1933): “Handsome free-flowering shrub of dense habit, well adapted for rockeries and borders …”

    ONLY AVAILABLE TO SHIP IN EARLY SPRING, WHILE DORMANT.  (USUALLY APRIL/MAY)

    Size: 2-3’ x 2-3’
    Care: sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Broad swath of central No. America from Canada to TX. Wisconsin native. Common shrub in Great Plains’ tall-grass prairies and seasonally wet soil.
    Wildlife Value: Honeybees and butterflies relish its nectar. Supports over 50 bee species.
    Awards: Great Plants for Great Plains

    Amorpha means “deformed” in Greek and “becoming grey” in Latin.  Called Lead plant due to old belief that plant grew in soil containing lead. 1st described in published work in 1813.  Used medicinally by numerous Native Americans to kill pinworms, remedy eczema, stomach aches, neuralgia, rheumatism and cuts.  Steeped leaves made tea for Oglala. Oglala mixed its dried leaves with buffalo fat for smoking.  Winnebago powdered the leaves, added water and applied it to skin to remedy scalds. They also ate the roots. Sioux: A tea made from leaves drank as a beverage, treated flu related congestion and as a bath for eczema.  Dried leaves part of mixture for smoking. Pre-bison hunt ceremony used stems.

  • Amsonia hubrichtii Thread leaf amsonia Z 5-8

    Blue spring flowers, feathery green summer foliage and golden fall color

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    $12.25/bareroot

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    An erect, clump-forming plant that is primarily grown for its blue spring flowers, feathery green summer foliage and golden fall color.  Powdery blue, 1/2″ star-like flowers appear in late spring atop stems rising to 3′ tall.

    Size: 2-3’ x 2-3’
    Care: full sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Ouachita Mountains in central Arkansas.

    First recorded in the 1770s as A. angustifolia, but later named Hubricht’s Amsonia, after Leslie Hubricht, an American biologist who re-discovered it in the 1940s.

  • Amsonia orientalis syn. Rhazya orientalis European bluestar Z 5-8

    Purplish blue flowers that are larger and longer lasting than other Amsonia. Yellow foliage in Fall.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    “Immensely tough and useful filler” “100 Plants Every Gardener Should Grow,” Gardens Illustrated No. 231
    Purplish blue flowers that are larger and longer lasting than other Amsonia. Yellow foliage in Fall.

    Size: 12-20” x spreading
    Care: sun to light shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Turkey

    Deer resistant, salt and heat tolerant.   Classified as critically endangered as it is losing its native habitat and was over harvested. Collected before 1844.

  • Amsonia tabernaemontana Willow bluestar Z 4-10

    Sky blue bells flower along terminal panicles from May to June.  In fall thin, willow-like foliage turns sunny yellow.

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Sky blue bells flower along terminal panicles from May to June.  In fall thin, willow-like foliage turns sunny yellow.

    Size: 24”x 18”
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil. Heat and drought tolerant.
    Native: Pennsylvania to Florida
    Awards: Chicago Botanic Garden Award of Merit.

    Amsonia named for 18th century colonial physician Charles Amson.  Tabernaemontana named for a physician who lived in the 1500’s, First described in 1788. Jakob van Bergzabern who changed his name to Tabernaemontanus.  Listed in The Wild Flowers of America, 1879.

  • Anchusa azurea Bugloss Z 3-8

    June-July true blue flowers, or all summer if deadheaded after bloom and before seeds set.

    $8.75/bareroot

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    June-July true blue flowers, or all summer if deadheaded after bloom and before seeds set.

    Size: 2-3' x 12'
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil.
    Native: Mediterranean region

    “…perennial plant, with broad rough leaves … the branches grow more erect, and the flowers which are of a bright azure colour, are collected into spikes, coming out singly between the leaves.” Philip Miller 1768. ” Lovely rich gentian blue flowers, freely borne from May to August.”  H.H. Thomas 1915. Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll, mother of today’s perennial gardens, in 1908.  Anchusa from anchousa a paint used on skin.

  • Anchusa capensis Cape forget-me-not, Cape bugloss Z 6-9

    Truest of blue flowers from summer through fall

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Truest of blue flowers from summer through fall.  Do you need to know anything else?

    Reseeding annual in colder zones.

    Size: 8” x 8”
    Care: sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: So. Africa.
    Awards: Plant Select® Central Rocky Mountain region

    Collected and introduced to Europe in 1794 by von Thunberg (1743-1828). Carl Peter von Thunberg, student of Linnaeus at Uppsala University in Sweden, made three trips to the Cape of Good Hope 1772-1775 where he collected about 1000 new species, Java and Ceylon (Sri Lanka) 1777 and 15 months in Japan where he befriended local doctors who gave him hundreds of plants new to Western horticulture.  He succeeded Linnaeus as professor of medicine and botany at Uppsala and King Gustav beknighted him.   Young Cape forget-me-not plants were eaten as a vegetable, Annals of the South African Museum, 1898.  Louise Beebe Wilder loved this plant, effusing, “One of the prettiest (blue annuals) is the Cape Forget-me-not.  Not one of its cerulean family boasts a purer blue and its summer-long period of bloom and indifference to drought make it a really valuable annual.  It has also a sturdy habit of growth and sowing its hardy seeds freely it does its best to become a permanent resident.”  Robinson called it “Remarkably fine…” The Garden 1873.  The name Anchusa from anchousa paint used on skin.

  • Andropogon scoparium Little bluestem Z 5-9

    Blue gray foliage turns plum orange in fall

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Blue gray  foliage turns plum orange in fall  with wispy, feather-like seed heads

    Size: 18" x 12"
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: all No. America, Wisconsin native

    Discovered by French plant hunter André Michaux (1746-1802) in America’s prairies.  Comanche used it to relieve syphilitic sores.  Lakota made soft wispy seed heads into liners for moccasins.

  • Anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’ Windflower Z 4-8

    Pearl-like buds open to graceful single white umbels in autumn.

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Pearl-like buds open to graceful single white umbels in autumn. One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated 94 (2013)

    Size: 4-5’x 12” and spreading
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Awards: Received England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit. 2016 Perennial Plant of Year

    The Japanese anemone introduced to cultivation in the West when Robert Fortune found them growing wild at a graveyard near Shanghai in 1844. Anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’ is a sport of a cross between Japanese anemone and A. vitifolia, introduced by Lady Amherst from Nepal in 1829.  This white sport appeared in the nursery of Messier Jobert at Verdun-sur-Meuse in 1851.  He propagated it and named it for his daughter, Honorine. The name Anemone is Greek for the wind, “so called, because the flower is supposed not to open, except the wind blows.” The Gardeners’ Dictionary, 1768.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.