Wisconsin Native

Showing 73–80 of 98 results

  • Potentilla tridentata syn. Sibbaldiopsis tridentate Three-toothed cinquefoil Z 2-8

    short subshrub that blooms all summer, then in fall the leaves turn burgundy.

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    Compact subshrub groundcover with white five-petaled flowers June – August. Leaves turn burgundy in fall.

    Size: 3-6” x 12-15”
    Care: sun in well-drained, acidic soil
    Native: most of eastern North America to the arctic, south to Georgia, WI native
    Wildlife Value: source of food for Copper butterflies
    Awards: Cary Award Distinctive Plants for New England

    Collected before 1789.

  • Pycanthemum virginianum Mountain mint Z 4-8

    Corymbs of numerous white blossoms, leaves fragrant.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Corymbs of numerous white blossoms in August, leaves fragrant, like mint.

    Size: 3' x 18"
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Wisconsin native, Eastern U.S.
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Pycanthemum is Greek meaning “dense blossom.” Chippewa used it to stop menstrual flow, cure chills and fever and to season meat. The plant gave the Meskwaki energy and lured minks into traps.

  • Ratibida pinnata Prairie coneflower Z 3-8

    drooping, sunny, thin petals surround erect brown cone

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Skirt of drooping, sunny, thin petals surround erect brown cone on this flower, June-August.  Flower is fragrant, smells of anise.

    Size: 3-4' x 18"
    Care: sun to part shade in any soil
    Native: Ontario, VT to FL, SD to OK, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies. Birds eat seeds.

    Pinnata means “feathery” in Latin referring to the thin petals of the flower.  1st Americans cured toothaches with the root & made tea from the cone and leaves.  Collected by French explorer Michaux on the prairies of Illinois in 1795.

  • Rudbeckia triloba Branched coneflower, Brown eyed susan Z 3-9

    Profuse, smallish yellow daisies with dark brown cones

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Profuse, smallish yellow daisies with dark brown cones from August to October.  Wonderful cut flower.

    Size: 4' x 3'
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil, immune to Walnut toxins
    Native: North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies Award: 1996 - Georgia Gold Medal winner.

    Rudbeckia was named by Linnaeus for his University of Upsala professor,Olaf Rudbeck.  Rudbeck made the surprising claim “that the Paradise of Scripture was situated somewhere in Sweden.”   C.F. Leyel. This species collected by English planthunter Rev. John Banister by 1670.

  • Ruellia humilis Prairie petunia Z 3-9

    lilac trumpets all summer and fall

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Lilac trumpets with dark pink veins all summer non-stop. Very long blooming but slow to emerge in spring.

     

    Size: 8-10" x 24"
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Midwest south to Florida and Texas, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds

    Ruellia  named for French royal herbalist Jean Ruell (1474-1537).  This species first collected by Thomas Nuttall, English plant hunter who found more American plants than anyone else, early 1800’s.

  • Scutellaria incana syn. Scutellaria canescens, Scutellaria villosa Downy skullcap Z 5-8

    Showy, open spikes of two-lipped Blue-violet florets from June-Sept  

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    $11.95/bareroot

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    Showy, open spikes of two-lipped Blue-violet florets from June-Sept

    Size: 2-3’ x 2’
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained acidic soil
    Native: Eastern US, west to WI, south to TX
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, hummingbirds and butterflies, deer resistant

    Described in Plantarum Novarum ex Herbario Sprengelii Centuriam 25. 1807 Johann Friedrich Theodor

  • Senna hebecarpa syn. Cassia hebecarpa Wild senna Z 4-8

    6” long taxicab yellow racemes in July – August

    $12.95/bareroot

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    6” long taxicab yellow racemes in July – August

    Size: 4’ x 2-6’
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Ontario; Maine south to Georgia and northwest to Tennessee and Wisconsin.
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies, birds & hummingbirds

    Collected before 1937. Very similar to Senna marilandica except a bit taller, flowers prettier and a slightly bulbous gland as the base of the petiole.

  • Silene regia Royal catchfly Z 5-8

    True crimson stars, brighter than a stop light

    $8.95/bareroot

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    True crimson stars, brighter than a stop light, in July – September, from the prairies.

    Size: 2-3’ x 1-2’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: from Ohio to Alabama W. to Nebraska, WI native
    Wildlife Value: hummingbird favorite.

    In Greek mythology Silene was a companion of Bacchus who was covered with foam. This plant pictured in Curtis’s Botanical Magazine, 1811