Wisconsin Native

Showing 37–40 of 109 results

  • Cornus canadensis Bunchberry, Creeping dogwood Z 2-7

    white, pointed bracts in spring and showy scarlet berries

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Four white, pointed bracts in spring and showy scarlet berries in fall

    Size: 6” x Indefinite but slow growing
    Care: part shade in moist, acidic soil. Needs moisture to establish
    Native: Northern areas from the east to the west coasts of No. America, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: Host for the caterpillar of the Spring azure butterfly.

    Abnaki Indians used this to cure side pains.  Algonquin made a cathartic tea, cured colds and stomach aches and Delaware reduced body pains. Chippewa, Cree and Eskimo smoked the berries. Probably 1st collected for gardens by John Bartram.  Offered for sale in Bartram Garden’s 1783 Broadside, America’s 1st plant catalog.   “One of the prettiest plants for the bog garden or the cool parts of the rock garden.”  William Robinson, 1899. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Corylus americana American Hazelnut, Filbert Z 4-9

    In spring, showy male flowers on 2-3" long catkins. Female flowers appear in small, reddish catkins grow into half inch long, egg-shaped edible nuts. Fall color ranges from orange, rose, purplish red, yellow and green.

    Placeholder

    $17.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

    Buy

    In spring, showy male flowers on 2-3″ long catkins. Female flowers appear in small, reddish catkins grow into half inch long, egg-shaped edible nuts. Fall color ranges from orange, rose, purplish red, yellow and green.

    Size: 10-16’ x 8-1’
    Care: sun in any soil
    Native: E. North America including Wisconsin
    Wildlife Value: Exceptionally high value to wildlife. Pheasant, Quail, Turkey, Grouse, Turkey & Blue Jay and small animals eat the nuts. Pollen source for bees, host to many caterpillars both butterflies and moths. Branches make good nesting sites for songbirds. Black walnut tolerant.

    Described by Thomas Walter in 1788. Food for several Native American tribes. Medicinal for Cherokee, Iroquois, Menominee, Meskwaki and Ojibwa, to remedy hives, fever, headaches, pain of baby’s teething, hay fever and induce vomiting.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Dalea aurea syn Parosela aurea Golden prairie clover Z 5-9

    Cone-shaped fuzzy yellow flower spikes rise above sparse foliage in April-June

    Placeholder

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Cone-shaped fuzzy yellow flower spikes rise above sparse foliage in April-June

    Size: 1-3’ x 1’
    Care: sun in dry soil
    Native: West US from TX to WY
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies
    Size: Native Americans used Golden Prairie-clover to treat diarrhea and colic

    Collected and described by Thomas Nuttall, 1813.

     

  • Dalea purpurea syn. Petalostemon purpurea Violet prairie clover

    Vase shaped clump with wands of violet to purple encircling tall coneheads

    $8.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Vase shaped clump with wands of violet to purple encircling tall coneheads.

    Size: 2’ x 18”
    Care: full sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Canada to Texas, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Host for caterpillars of Dogface Sulphur, Striped blue & Mexican blue butterflies.

    Dalea named to honor English botanist Dr. Samuel Dale (1659- 1739.)  Chippewa, Meskwaki and Navajo used medicinally – as remedies for heart ailments, pneumonia, diarrhea and measles.  Comanche and Lakota chewed the root like gum, for its sweet taste.  Pawnee made brooms from the flexible stems.  1st collected by Frenchman André Michaux (1746-1802) who spent 11 years in America collecting hundreds of new plants.  Bailey described the flowers: “a constant succession of showy spikes of flowers…”(1933)