Wisconsin Native

Showing 17–24 of 113 results

  • Asclepias verticillata Whorled milkweed Z 4-10 POISON

    Fragrant flat-topped clusters of many small white flowers atop single stem surrounded by narrow, grass-like leaves. Blooms July through October. 

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    Fragrant flat-topped clusters of many small white flowers atop single stem surrounded by narrow, grass-like leaves. Blooms July through October. 

    Size: 12-30” x 12-24” spreading
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: all US, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: deer & rabbit resistant. Bees & butterflies eat nectar. Host for Monarch caterpillars.
    Size: root used to induce sweating for Choctaw, Chickasaw and Creek natives

    Collected by 1753. Grown at America’s 1st botanic garden, Elgin Botanic Garden 1811.

  • Aster azureus syn. Symphyotricum oolentangiense var. oolentangiense Sky blue aster Z 3-9

    Showy true cornflower-blue daisies in August-October

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    Showy true cornflower-blue daisies in August-October

    Size: 2-3’ x 2’
    Care: full sun to part shade in any soil
    Native: NY to SD, FL to TX incl. WI
    Wildlife Value: Aster species are nectar sources for many butterflies – Checkered white and Checkered skippers, Spring azure, Pearl crescent, Buckeye, Painted lady, Fiery skipper, Sachem, Sleepy orange, Silver-spotted skipper and Monarch.

    Collected before 1889.

  • Aster cordifolium Blue wood aster Z 3-8

    Blue daisies late summer into fall - sun to shade

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    Heart-shaped foliage smothered with blue daisies from late summer to fall, perfect companion for anemones


    Care: Sun to shade in moist well-drained to dry soil
    Native: Canada to Florida, west to Oklahoma, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Nectar source for many butterflies

    1st described by Jacques Philippe Cornuti in 1635.  Likely collected and transported to France by Samuel de Champlain.  Grown in Jardin du Roi in Paris.

  • Aster divaricatus syn. Eurybia divaricatus White wood aster Z 4-8

    Sprays of loose, white daisies brighten the late summer and early fall garden.

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Sprays of loose, white daisies brighten the late summer and early fall garden.

    Size: 24" x 24"
    Care: part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil, immune to Black walnuts
    Native: East North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Gertrude Jekyll, mother of the perennial border, often used this American native in combination with Bergenia. Cultivated in American gardens since 1800’s.

  • Aster novae angliae syn. Symphyotrichum New England Aster Z 4-8

    Masses of violet, pink or magenta daisies cloak bushy New England asters from August to October.

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    Masses of violet, pink or magenta daisies cloak bushy New England asters from August to October.

    Size: 3-5' x 24"
    Care: Full sun dry to moist soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Vt to Alabama, west to N. M., Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Introduced to gardens by Englishman Tradescant the Younger in 1637 when he carried it from Virginia Colony to England. Cultivated by George Washington.

  • Aster oblongifolius syn. Symphyotrichum oblongifolium, Aromatic aster Z 3-8

    Purplish blue daisies with yellow center blooming in September to November, Good, bushy mound shape.

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    Purplish blue daisies with yellow center blooming in September to November, Good, bushy mound shape.

    Size: 1-2’ x 1-3’
    Care: sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Pennsylvania to No. Carolina west to Wyoming & Texas, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Bees collect pollen and nectar from it. Medium sized butterflies collect its nectar. Its leaves support Silvery checkerspot and some moth caterpillars, Deer resistant.

    Meriwether Lewis collected this on the Expedition September 21, 1804, the day after nearly being swept away while Lewis and the Corps of discovery slept on the eroding sandbar, near the Big Bend of the Missouri River in South Dakota. 1st described by planthunter Thomas Nuttall in 1818.

  • Baptisia australis False Indigo Z 3-9

    Indigo blue racemes in June followed by ornamental pods

    $11.95/bareroot

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    In early summer loose spikes bear big blue blossoms which turn to large black seed pods. Four foot tall foliage resembles a shrub.

    Size: 3-5' x 24"
    Care: Full sun sandy soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: Eastern United States, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies
    Awards: Perennial Plant Association Plant of Year 2010

    As its common name describes, this plant was used as a substitute for indigo dye. Horticultural greats Bailey, Breck and Robinson considered Baptisia handsome. Introduced in 1758.

  • Baptisia leucantha White Wild Indigo Z 3-9

    Georgeous creamy white spikes of pea-like blooms

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    Gorgeous creamy white spikes of pea-like blooms in May & June followed by ornamental pods

    Size: 3-5' x 2-3'
    Care: full sun to part shade in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: from Minnesota to Texas, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    For the HoChunk “(t)he root is a single remedy to use for injured womb alone. Cook the root and mash it to form a poltice to bind on. Wash with water and draw out the inflammation.”