Wisconsin Native

Showing 17–24 of 98 results

  • Aster cordifolium Blue wood aster Z 3-8

    Blue daisies late summer into fall - sun to shade

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Heart-shaped foliage smothered with blue daisies from late summer to fall, perfect companion for anemones

     


    Care: Sun to shade in moist well-drained to dry soil
    Native: Canada to Florida, west to Oklahoma, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Nectar source for many butterflies

    1st described by Jacques Philippe Cornuti in 1635.  Likely collected and transported to France by Samuel de Champlain.  Grown in Jardin du Roi in Paris.

  • Aster divaricatus syn. Eurybia divaricatus White wood aster Z 4-8

    Sprays of loose, white daisies brighten the late summer and early fall garden.

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Sprays of loose, white daisies brighten the late summer and early fall garden.

    Size: 24" x 24"
    Care: part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil, immune to Black walnuts
    Native: East North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Gertrude Jekyll, mother of the perennial border, often used this American native in combination with Bergenia. Cultivated in American gardens since 1800’s.

  • Aster novae angliae syn. Symphyotrichum New England Aster Z 4-8

    Masses of violet, pink or magenta daisies cloak bushy New England asters from August to October.

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    $11.95/bareroot

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    Masses of violet, pink or magenta daisies cloak bushy New England asters from August to October.

    Size: 3-5' x 24"
    Care: Full sun dry to moist soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Vt to Alabama, west to N. M., Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Introduced to gardens by Englishman Tradescant the Younger in 1637 when he carried it from Virginia Colony to England. Cultivated by George Washington.

  • Aster oblongifolius syn. Symphyotrichum oblongifolium, Aromatic aster Z 3-8

    Purplish blue daisies with yellow center blooming in September to November, Good, bushy mound shape.

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    $9.25/bareroot

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    Purplish blue daisies with yellow center blooming in September to November, Good, bushy mound shape.

    Size: 1-2’ x 1-3’
    Care: sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Pennsylvania to No. Carolina west to Wyoming & Texas, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Bees collect pollen and nectar from it. Medium sized butterflies collect its nectar. Its leaves support Silvery checkerspot and some moth caterpillars, Deer resistant.

    Meriwether Lewis collected this on the Expedition September 21, 1804, the day after nearly being swept away while Lewis and the Corps of discovery slept on the eroding sandbar, near the Big Bend of the Missouri River in South Dakota. 1st described by planthunter Thomas Nuttall in 1818.

  • Baptisia australis False Indigo Z 3-9

    Indigo blue racemes in June followed by ornamental pods

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    In early summer loose spikes bear big blue blossoms which turn to large black seed pods. Four foot tall foliage resembles a shrub.

    Size: 3-5' x 24"
    Care: Full sun sandy soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: Eastern United States, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies
    Awards: Perennial Plant Association Plant of Year 2010

    As its common name describes, this plant was used as a substitute for indigo dye. Horticultural greats Bailey, Breck and Robinson considered Baptisia handsome. Introduced in 1758.

  • Baptisia leucantha White Wild Indigo Z 3-9

    Georgeous creamy white spikes of pea-like blooms

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    Gorgeous creamy white spikes of pea-like blooms in May & June followed by ornamental pods

    Size: 3-5' x 2-3'
    Care: full sun to part shade in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: from Minnesota to Texas, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    For the HoChunk “(t)he root is a single remedy to use for injured womb alone. Cook the root and mash it to form a poltice to bind on. Wash with water and draw out the inflammation.”

  • Baptisia sphaerocarpa Yellow wild indigo Z 5-8

    Spikes of yellow pea-like flowers

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    Spikes of yellow pea-like flowers, a legume, in spring.

    Size: 2-3’ x 2-3’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to dry soil
    Native: Missouri to Mississippi to TX

    Baptisia is Greek meaning “to dye” referring to use of Baptisia australis as a substitute for indigo dye. Sphaerocarpa means “round seed.”  Collected by English planthunter Thomas Nuttall before 1834.

  • Calylophus serrulatus Yellow sundrops, Shrubby evening primrose Z 4-9

    Lemon yellow silky petals bloom late spring to early fall on this tough-as-nails native

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    Lemon yellow silky petals bloom late spring to early fall on this tough-as-nails native

    Size: 9-18” x 12-15”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil, drought tolerant
    Native: Great Plains: Central Canada to TX, Michigan to Montana, WI native

    1st described in 1818 by Thomas Nuttall, English planthunter who collected hundreds of “new” plants in North America. Caly is Greek for calyx; lophos for “the back of the neck; crest of a hill or helmet”  serrulatus means “minutely serrate” or “saw-toothed” describing the leaf margins.