Wisconsin Native

Showing 25–32 of 98 results

  • Campanula rotundifolia Harebell, Bluebell of Scotland Z 3-8

    Dainty bluish-lilac bells blooms June - October

    $8.75/pot

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    This Bluebell’s delicate appearance conceals its hardy constitution. Dainty bluish-lilac bells top 12″ stems on bushy plants blooming from June through October. Perfect for rock gardens and borders.

    Size: 9-12" x S 12"
    Care: Sun to part shade moist well-drained soil, tolerant Walnut toxicity
    Native: Europe, Siberia and North America, Wisconsin native

    No wonder Sir Walter Scott immortalized the Bluebell of Scotland in Lady of the Lake. Also a subject in Emily Dickinson’s poetry.

  • Carex comosa Longhair sedge, Bristly sedge Z 4-10

    Ornamental dangling bottle brush spikes from May to August

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Ornamental dangling bottle brush spikes from May to August

    Size: 2-4’ x 2’
    Care: Sun to part shade in wet to moist soil
    Native: all of sub-Arctic No. America except western intermountain states and provinces and except Alaska.
    Wildlife Value: food for caterpillars of several butterflies. Seeds provide food for wetland birds

    Rhizomes stabilize shorelines while plants give ducks cover and the seeds provide food. Good rain garden plant.

  • Carex grayi Gray’s Sedge Z 3-8

    Club-like maces in June through fall.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Flowers look like club-like maces in June to December.  This one will make your friends & neighbors ask “what the heck is it?”

    Size: 30" x 24"
    Care: Full sun to part shade in moist soil
    Native: Vermont west to Wisconsin, south to Georgia and Missouri

    Collected before 1880.

  • Caulophyllum thalictroides Blue cohosh Z 3-8

    Glaucous blue-green leaves can be mistaken for meadowrue. Inconspicuous yellow flowers from April-May followed by blue-berried seeds in fall.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Glaucous blue-green leaves can be mistaken for meadowrue. Inconspicuous yellow flowers from April-May followed by blue-berried seeds in fall.

    Size: 1-3’ x 1’ slow spreading to form colonies
    Care: shade in moist well-drained soil, deer and rabbit resistant
    Native: Eastern and Central North America, WI Native
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees and moths, mice and birds eat the berries

    Collected by Michaux c. 1800.

  • Cephalanthus occidentalis Button bush, Honey balls Z 4-10

    Perfectly round, white flowers perfume the air in Aug. & Sept. Red leaf stems contrast with green foliage.

    $16.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    Perfectly round, white flowers perfume the air in Aug. & Sept.  Red leaf stems contrast with green foliage.  Ships only in spring

    Size: 6' x 8'
    Care: Full sun to part shade in wet to moist well-drained soil
    Native: New Brunswick S. to Fla. W. to CA.
    Wildlife Value: Important shrub to maintain water quality and for wildlife habitat. Its roots absorb nutrients in water and reduce erosion along water's edges. Flowers attract butterflies. Birds nest in branches.

    Many medicinal uses for several tribes – Chickasaw, Choctaw, Kiowa, Meskwaki and Seminole, believed to remedy sore eyes, toothaches, dysentery, hemorrhages, headaches, nausea, fevers, constipation, ailments in horses and “wolf ghost sickness.” Rand 1866: “Valuable for blooming at a season when the shrubbery is bare of flowers.” Offered for sale in Bartram Garden’s 1783 Broadside, America’s 1st plant catalog.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Chelone glabra White turtlehead Z 3-8

    Spikes of ivory, hooded turtlehead-like flowers encircle stems in August & September

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Spikes of ivory, hooded turtlehead-like flowers encircle stems in August & September.

    Size: 2-3’ x 12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: all eastern No. Am. except FL
    Wildlife Value: food for caterpillar of Baltimore checkerspot & nectar for butterflies.

    The name Chelone originated with French colonial settlers in Nova Scotia before 1700,  “La Tortue,” meaning “turtle” in French.  M. Dierville transported it to France along with the local name.  In 1706 French botanist Tournefort adopted the Greek word for turtle as its name, Chelone. Cherokee ate boiled or fried new stems and leaves.  Also used medicinally by soaking flowers in water to cure worms, skin sores, fever & constipation.  Cherokee boiled roots for excess gall and soaked smashed roots to ward off witchery.  Micmac & Malecite steeped the plant to make a contraceptive. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Cimicifuga racemosa Cohosh, Bugbane Z 3-8

    Majestic milky white candles covered with buds like pearls

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Majestic milky white candles covered with buds like pearls that open to frilly balls in August

    Size: 4-6' x 2-4'
    Care: Part shade, moist soil
    Native: east N. America, Wisconsin native

    Cimicifuga is Latin meaning “bug” and fugere meaning “to drive away.” “Bugbane” refers to the plant’s odor, repelling insects. “Cohosh” is Algonquin for “rough” referring to the feel of the root. American Indians used its roots medicinally as an astringent, poison and snakebite antidote and to stop coughing. Roots considered an aphrodisiac for women.

  • Clematis virginiana Virgin’s bower, Devil’s darning needles Z 4-8

    July-September star-like white blossoms

    $15.95/bareroot

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    July-September star-like white blossoms cover this vine – good for clambering up small trees.

    Size: 12-20’ x 4’
    Care: Sun to shade moist well-drained soil. Flowers on new stems so cut back in late winter or early spring to 6-8” above the ground.
    Native: Nova Scotia to Georgia and as far west as Kansas, Wisconsin native

    The genus Clematis was named by Dioscordes, physician in Nero’s army, from “klema” meaning climbing plant. One of 1st No. American plants sent to Europe – grew in Tradescant the Elder’s South Lambeth nursery in 1634.  Grown by Jefferson at Monticello in 1807.  Described by Breck in his 1851 book The Flower Garden: “The flowers are white borne upon cymes, and make a handsome appearance.”  Cherokee mixed this plant with milkweed to remedy backaches.  A root extract cured stomach aches, nervous conditions and kidney ailments.  For the Iroquois powdered root fixed venereal disease sores and an extract of the stem brought on strange dreams.  Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.