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Showing 41–48 of 125 results

  • Cryptotaenia japonica ‘Atropurpurea’ Purple-leaved Japanese Wild Parsley, Japanese honeywort Z 4-7

    Flowers light pink small umbels in mid-summer but forget the flowers and grow this for its showy purple bronze stems and leaves, branched stems with deeply divided, compound leaves and slightly ruffled

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    Flowers light pink small umbels in mid-summer but forget the flowers and grow this for its showy purple bronze stems and leaves, branched stems with deeply divided, compound leaves and slightly ruffled edges

    Size: 18-24" x 8" and self-seeds to make clumps
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: eastern Asia

    1st described in Journal of Japanese Botany in 1926. Asians use Honeywort as a seasoning, a strengthening tonic and eat its sprouts in salads but toxic if eaten in large quantities.
    CAUTION: may cause dermatitis with repeated contact in some people; toxic if eaten in large quantities.

  • Cynara cardunculus Cardoon Z 7-9

    Spectacular basal foliage - arching, silvery, deeply incised leaves, Late summer-fall spiny buds open to rich purple feathery flowers.

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    In colder areas grow as annual
    Spectacular basal foliage – arching, silvery, deeply incised leaves. Late summer-fall spiny buds open to rich purple feathery flowers.

    Size: 3-4’ x 3-4’
    Care: sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Cut off flowers immediately after flowering to bring on new foliage, gorgeous into late fall.
    Native: Southern Europe

    The leaf stems, blanched, are also edible. Bridgemen, The Young Gardeners Assistant (1847)
    Described by Linneaus 1753.

  • Dahlia ‘Bishop of Llandaff’ Tender perennial

    Fiery red, sem-double flowers atop reliably purple foliage from July until frost,

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    Fiery red, semi-double flowers atop reliably purple foliage from July until frost

    Size: 2-3’ x 12”
    Care: moist well drained soil in full sun – lift bulb in fall, overwinter in basement
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit – 1928.

    Dahlias originally grown as food by Aztecs. 1st collected for the West by Spaniards in Mexico in 1615. The genus named after Dr. Anders Dahl, a student of Linnaeus and later a Swedish botanist in his own right. This cultivar came from a batch of chance seedlings in the nursery of breeder Fred Treseder in Wales UK. Treseder offered this and a few others to Bishop Joshua Hughes of Llandaff in 1924.

  • Dianthus anatolicus Anatolian pink Z 5-10

    Dense mound-forming perennial with needle-like, evergreen grey foliage. Masses of whitish pink, feather- margined flowers with a wine-colored eye bloom in May-June. Highly regarded alpine plant.

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    Dense mound-forming perennial with needle-like, evergreen grey foliage. Masses of whitish pink, feather- margined flowers with a wine-colored eye bloom in May-June. Highly regarded alpine plant.

    Size: 3” x 6”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Turkey to Tibet

    Theophrastus named Dianthus in the 4th century B.C., meaning “Jove’s flower.” The common name “pink” is from “pinct” referring to the jagged edge of the petals.   In 1629 John Parkinson described the Dianthus: “There remain divers sorts of wild or small Gilloflowers (which wee usually call Pinkes) to be entreated of, some bearing single, and some double flowers, some smooth, almost without any deepe dents on the edges, and some ragged, or as it were feathered.” This species described in Diagnoses Plantarum Orientalium Novarum, ser. 1 1: 22. 1843.

  • Dianthus arpadianus

    Small pale pink flowers sit above short clumps of evergreen foliage  

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    Small pale pink flowers sit above short clumps of evergreen foliage

    Size: 3” x 3”
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Greece & Turkey

    Collected before 1934

  • Dianthus petraeus Z 4-8

    Evergreen foliage with fragrant, serrated, solitary white flowers in mid-summer

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    Evergreen foliage with fragrant, serrated, solitary white flowers in mid-summer

    Size: 4-6” x 6-8”
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Mountain ranges of Central Europe
    Wildlife Value: Deer Resistant

    Collected before 1823

  • Dicentra eximia Fringed bleeding heart Z 4-8

    May to October, dangling rose pink heart-shaped panicles

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    May to October,  dangling rose pink heart-shaped panicles.  Shade flower that blooms all summer- what could be better?

    Size: 10” x 8”
    Care: Part shade, moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Mountains from New York to Georgia
    Wildlife Value: Nectar source for hummingbirds & White swallowtail butterfly.

    Dicentra derived from Greek dis meaning two and kentros meaning spurs. Introduced to gardens by John Bartram in mid-1700’s.   Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll, mother of mixed perennial borders, in 1908.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Draba ramosissima Branched draba Z 5-8

    Spring to early summer white clusters

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    Spring to early summer white clusters held above the spider-like foliage on wiry stems.

    Size: 6-12” x 12-15”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Appalachian Mountains in SE US

    Collected by 1815.