Perennials & Biennials

Showing 109–112 of 513 results

  • Campanula rotundifolia Harebell, Bluebell of Scotland Z 3-8

    Dainty bluish-lilac bells blooms June - October

    $8.25/pot

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    Campanula rotundifolia Harebell or Bluebell of Scotland  Z 3-8
    This Bluebell’s delicate appearance conceals its hardy constitution. Dainty bluish-lilac bells top 12″ stems on bushy plants blooming from June through October. Perfect for rock gardens and borders.

    Size: 9-12" x S 12"
    Care: Sun to part shade moist well-drained soil, tolerant Walnut toxicity
    Native: Europe, Siberia and North America, Wisconsin native

    No wonder Sir Walter Scott immortalized the Bluebell of Scotland in Lady of the Lake. Also a subject in Emily Dickinson’s poetry.

  • Carex rosea Rosy sedge, Stellate sedge PERENNIAL GRASS Z. 3-9

    Mounds of thinnest of medium green leaves mingled with stems with star shaped seed clusters in May-June

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    Carex rosea Rosy sedge, Stellate sedge, Curley-styled wood sedge   PERENNIAL GRASS Z. 3-9
    Mounds of thinnest of medium green leaves mingled with stems with star shaped seed clusters in May-June.

    Size: 12” x 10”
    Care: part shade and shade in moist well-drained soil
    Wildlife Value: No. Dakota south to TX & east incl. WI, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

    Collected before 1811.

  • Catanache caerulea Cupid’s dart Z 4-8

    July – September violet cornflower-like flowers with rectangular petals fringed at the ends with deep purple centers.

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    Catanache caerulea Cupid’s dart Z 4-8
    July – September violet cornflower-like flowers with rectangular petals fringed at the ends with deep purple centers.

    Size: 16-18” x 8-12”
    Care: sun in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Mediterranean

    An aphrodisiac in ancient Greece. The genus name is adapted from the Greek name for this plant, Katananke which means “forced down against choice” or “compulsion,” as it was believed to be the date rape drug of its day. It is called Cupid’s dart even now because Greeks & Romans used the plant into food of an object of affection. However, it has no actual effect, except perhaps belief in a myth.

  • Centaurea atropurpurea Red knapweed Z 5-9

    Ruby-red to merlot, soft thistle-like blooms June-August

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    Centaurea atropurpurea   Red knapweed  Z 5-9
    Ruby-red to merlot, soft thistle-like blooms June-August, repeating if deadheaded, atop silvery, deep cut foliage, rare.

    Size: 4’ x 2’
    Care: sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: meadows of Carpathian mountains
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant

    Centaurea named for the Centaur, half-horse and half-man who was a mythical healer. Red knapweed described by French entomologist Guillaume Antoine Olivier (1756-1814).