Perennials & Biennials

Showing 97–100 of 495 results

  • Brunnera macrophyllum Siberian bugloss Z 3-7

    Robin's egg blue forget-me-not- type flowers in May and June, contrasts with bold foliage,

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Brunnera macrophyllum Siberian bugloss  Z 3-7
    Panicles of robin’s egg blue forget-me-not- type flowers in May and June, contrasts with its bold foliage. One of the best spring flowers.

    Size: 18" x 24"
    Care: part shade to shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Caucasus & Siberia

    Named for Samuel Brunner (1790-1844) Swiss botanist. Collected before 1860.

  • Calamintha nepeta ssp. nepeta syn. Clinopodium nepeta ssp. nepeta Lesser calamint Z 4-9

    Profuse violet blooms on mint-scented, gray-green foliage gives frosty image, June-October

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Calamintha nepeta ssp. nepeta syn. Clinopodium nepeta ssp. nepeta Lesser calamint  Z 4-9
    Profuse violet blooms on mint-scented, gray-green foliage gives frosty image,  June-October

    Size: 18-24” x 8-12”
    Native: Europe and Mediterranean
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds

    This subspecies 1st described by Linnaeus in 1753. Genus name comes from Greek kalos meaning beautiful and minthe meaning mint.  It is not, however, a mint and is not invasive.

  • Callirhoe involucrata Wine cups, Prairie poppy mallow

    Magenta-purple upfacing cups, June - October

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Callirhoe involucrata  Purple mallow, Wine cups, Prairie poppy mallow  Z 3-9
    Magenta-purple upfacing cups, June – October, non-stop.  Wonderful for rock gardens or as a ground cover.

    Size: 6" x 12"
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: Missouri to Texas

    Although an American prairie native, Callirhoe is named for the daughter of the Greek river god. Teton Dakota burned its dried root for smoke to cure the common cold and aches and pains. First collected by Thomas Nuttall in 1834. Ferry’s 1876 catalog described it as having “a trailing habit, of great beauty.” William Robinson extolled Prairie mallow as “excellent for the rock garden, bearing a continuous crop of showy blossoms from early summer till late in autumn.”

  • Caltha palustris Marsh marigold, Kingscup Zones 3-7

    Finch yellow buttercups in early spring top round, kidney-shaped foliage

    $8.95/bareroot

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    Caltha palustris Marsh marigold, Kingscup  Zones 3-7
    Finch yellow buttercups in early spring top round, kidney-shaped foliage

    Size: 12-18” x 12-18”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, acidic soil
    Native: Maine to No. Dakota S. to Tennessee
    Wildlife Value: Attracts birds
    Size: Caltha is Latin meaning “cup” and palustris means “boggy” or “marsh.” America’s 1st people used the roots medicinally to cure colds and sores and to induce vomiting. The roots also protected against “love charms,” (but I suspect the vomiting might have accomplished that.) An infusion of leaves remedied constipation.

    Introduced to Europe very early and memorialized in Chaucer’s poetry, 1549. Grown in the Eichstätt Garden, the garden of Johann Konrad von Gemmingen, prince bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria, c. 1600.

    LH Bailey considered the flowers “very beautiful,” while Rand called them “very showy.” Wm. Robinson described them as “shin(ing) like fires in swamps and hollows.” Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.