Perennials & Biennials

Showing 193–200 of 471 results

  • Gaillardia aristata Blanket flower Z 3-8

    Yellow and red daisy petals surround red cones non-stop

    $8.95/bareroot

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    Yellow and red daisy petals surround red cones non-stop, June-October, a true winner.

    Size: 30” x 24”
    Care: sun, well-drained soil
    Native: Western US, Canada to Arizona

    Named for French botanist, M. Gaillard de MarentonneauFirst found by Meriwether Lewis in July 1806, then collected by Thomas Nuttall,  1811 and then by David Douglas in the Rocky Mountains around 1812.  Blackfoot used Blanket flower to absorb soup and waterproof rawhide.  The entire plant toasted and pounded, mixed with bear grease cured mumps. It prevented balding and cured eye ailments in horses.

  • Galium odoratum Sweet woodruff, Bedstraw Z 4-8

    white blooms in spring & whorls of fine textured leaves

    $7.45/pot

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    Whorls of fine textured leaves, like spokes of a wheel, with white blooms in spring light up the shade. Makes great groundcover, especially under trees & shrubs

    Size: 6-12" x 18" spreading
    Care: shade to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil. Tolerant Walnut toxicity. Deer resistant.
    Native: Europe and Mediterranean area

    Called “Bedstraw” because, according to legend, Mary rested on hay of Bedstraw on Christmas.  Bedstraw made May wine, an ancient herbal remedy: handful of dried and crushed leaves plus fresh lemon juice steeped in wine for 3-4 hours “makes a man merry and (is) good for the heart and liver” per Gerard, 1633.  Garlands hanging in houses in summer “coole and make fresh the place, to the delight and comfort of such as are therein.”  Gerard.  Dried branches give a grassy vanilla fragrance, used in sachets and potpourris, as an insect repellant and to make grey-green dyes.

  • Gaultheria procumbens Wintergreen, Checkerberry, Teaberry Z 3-8

    Urn-like spring blossoms, fall red berries

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    OUT OF STOCK

    “Gaultheria procumbens is in absolute perfection and beautiful – first as regards its bell-shaped blossoms, and afterwards its berries…”  The Garden , January 1876.

    Size: 4” x 2’, slow but dense groundcover in time.
    Care: part shade in moist to moist well-drained, acidic soil
    Native: Eastern North America – Canada to Georgia west to Michigan, Wisconsin
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Named by Swedish botanist Peter Kalm after Dr. Gaulthier, with whom he botanized in Canada and the upper Midwest in 1749. But 1st described as a grape in 1717. Ojibwa made tea from the leaves because the tea “makes them feel good.”  Algonquin used Wintergreen to cure the common cold, headaches, grippe and stomachaches.  Cherokee used it to cure swollen gums and colds. Wintergreen was sent to England in 1762.  Sold in America’s 1st plant catalog, Bartram’s Broadside, 1783. During the American Revolution when tea became unavailable, colonists used the plant to make tea.  The tea reputedly relieved pain from headaches, muscle pains and colds.  The leaves contain oil effective against pain – methyl salicylate. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Gentiana dahurica Siberian Gentian da wu li qin jiao in China Z 4-7

    Clusters of dark blue tubes with white throats extend from leaf axils blooming in late summer – early fall. One of the easiest (least picky) gentians to grow.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Clusters of dark blue tubes with white throats extend from leaf axils blooming in late summer – early fall. One of the easiest (least picky) gentians to grow.

    Size: 6-12” x 12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Hebei, Nei Mongol, Ningxia, Qinghai, Shaanxi, Shandong, Shanxi, Sichuan, China & Mongolia, Russia.

    Gentian named after King Gentius of Illyria in the Adriatic. He discovered medicinal uses for gentians around 180 B.C. This species described in 1812.

  • Gentiana gracilipes Kansu gentian, Grass-leaved gentian Z 4-8

    Trumpet-shaped Purple-blue flowers with white centers cluster on trailing stems with lance shaped leaves from July – September

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Trumpet-shaped Purple-blue flowers with white centers cluster on trailing stems with lance shaped leaves from July – September

    Size: 6-12” x 12-15”
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: NW China

    Collected by 1915.

  • Geranium macrorrhizum Bigroot Geranium Z 4-8

    Medium pink flowers in early summer

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Medium pink flowers in early summer have prominent stamens. Foliage smells like pine boughs, reminds you of Christmas.

    Size: 20" x 24"
    Care: part shade in moist, to moist well-drained soil. Tolerates Walnut toxicity.
    Native: Southern Europe

    Geranium is Greek meaning “crane” referring to the shape of fruit resembling the bill of a crane.   This species cultivated in England by 1600 and in the U.S. in the 1800’s.

  • Geranium maculatum American Cranesbill Z 4-8

    Bright pink to lilac pink blooms

    $11.25/bareroot

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    Geranium maculatum  American Cranesbill, Wild geranium, Spotted geranium  Z 4-8
    Bright pink to lilac pink blooms in June – July

    Size: 30" x 18"
    Care: Full sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil, immune to Walnut toxicity
    Native: East North America, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Geranium is Greek meaning “crane” referring to the shape of fruit resembling the bill of a crane.   This species 1st collected by Michaux.  Jefferson asked John Bartram to obtain seeds, 1786. G. maculatum considered “a showy native species” (Bailey.)  Native Americans taught colonists to use the plant to cure diarrhea, dysentery and hemorrhaging. Also used on open wounds and sore feet. Sent to Europe in 1732.

  • Geranium phaeum ‘Samobor’ Mourning widow Z 4-9

    Very distinctive variegated chocolate-green chevron-marked leaves. Nodding, eggplant purple flowers in late spring-early summer.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Very distinctive variegated chocolate-green chevron-marked leaves. Nodding, eggplant purple flowers in late spring-early summer.

    Size: 12-15” x 12"
    Care: sun to shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Croatia
    Wildlife Value: Deer & rabbit resistant. Attracts butterflies and pollinators

    OK you caught me – this had it’s 30th birthday in 2020. In 25 more years it will be eligible for Social Security.   But it’s such a wonderful plant it’s OK to make an occasional exception for something exceptional. Discovered in 1990 by Elizabeth Strangman of Washfield Nursery in Kent England, where the very first ‘Samobor’ in cultivation still grows. It is a natural variant found growing in damp woods in Croatia. It is named for the Croation town of Samobor.