Perennials & Biennials

Showing 209–216 of 471 results

  • Glaucium flavum Yellow horned poppy Z 5-10 short-lived perennial, reseeding generously

    Its silver, deep-cut foliage is reason enough to grow this. The bright yellow flower much of summer tops it off.  

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    Its silver, deep-cut foliage is reason enough to grow this. The bright yellow flower much of summer tops it off.

    Can not ship to: Maine and Massachusetts

     

    Size: 1-2’ x 1-2’
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Europe esp. sea coasts.
    Wildlife Value: deer resistant

    This was identified by Dioscordies in De Materica Medica for medicinal use around 70 A.D. Philip Miller’s Dictionary (1763) called it Cheliodonium glaucium while Tournefort (1703) called it Glaucium flore luteo. Thank goodness for common names – it is ID’ed as Yellow Horn Poppy.

  • Globularia cordifolia Globe daisy, Wedge leaved globularia Z 5-9

    Dense, blue, globe-shaped umbels in spring

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    Dense, blue, globe-shaped umbels in spring, mat forming, leathery, spoon-shaped leaves.

    Size: 5” x 12”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: alpine pastures in Switzerland and Pyrenees
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Collected before 1753.  “The most desirable (Globularia) for the rockwork is the neat G. cordifolia which is a little prostrate trailing shrub with bluish flowers.” William Robinson 1879.

  • Globularia nudicaulis Globe daisy Z 3-8

    Cobalt blue puffs on naked stems rise above compact rosettes of glossy oval leaves, May-June

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    $8.95/pot

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    Cobalt blue puffs on naked stems rise above compact rosettes of glossy oval leaves blooming May-June

    Size: 4-8” x 4”
    Care: Sun to part shade in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant/rock garden plant.
    Native: northern Spain to the Pyrenees Mountains

    In gardens before 1753

  • Gypsophila repens ‘Rosea’ Creeping baby’s breath Z 4-7

    Dainty white flowers from June to October

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    Dainty pink flowers from June to October on short, thin foliage.  Makes excellent groundcover, front of the border or rock garden plant.

    Size: 8" x 12-20"
    Care: Sun well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Mountains of central and southern Europe
    Awards: England's Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Gypso is Greek meaning “gypsum or lime.”  Phylos means “loving.” Plant requires limey soil.  Discovered in Siberia in 1774.  American garden cultivation since 1800’s.

  • Helenium hoopesii syn. Hymenoxys hoopesii Orange sneezeweed, Owlsclaws Z 3-8

    Large mustard yellow daisies with drooping petals and yellow center flowers May to September

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Large mustard yellow daisies with drooping petals and yellow center flowers May to September, if deadheaded.

    Size: 3’ x 2’
    Care: sun in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Rocky Mountains
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Collected by C.C. Parry (1823-1890).  Liberty Hyde Bailey (1933) referred to this as “a very fine border plant and especially laudable for cut flowers.”

  • Helleborus foetidus Bear’s foot Z 5-8

    Nodding chartreuse cups with purple accents

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    Nodding chartreuse cups with purple accents emerge in Feb-April from evergreen, palmate foliage with purple tones.  Even before the Robin appears – the 1st sign of spring.

    Size: 12-24" x 18-24"
    Care: full to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: W. Europe
    Awards: Great Plant Pick Award from Elizabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden.

    The name Helleborus is Greek from hellein meaning “to kill” and bora meaning “food” referring to the plant’s poisonous qualities if placed in food.  Foetidus because crushed leaves are malodorous, but the flowers are sweetly fragrant. So smell the flowers but don’t crush the leaves. In gardens before 1753.

  • Helleborus niger Christmas rose, Black hellebore Z 5-8 POISON

    Outfacing, white, waxy cup-shaped flowers resembling single roses in late winter, evergreen leaves.

    $12.95/bareroot

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    Outfacing, white, waxy cup-shaped flowers resembling single roses in late winter, evergreen leaves.

    Size: 12-20” x 12”
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained soil Native: rocky places in Europe
    Awards: Received Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    The name Helleborus is Greek from hellein meaning “to kill” and bora meaning “food” referring to the plant’s poisonous qualities if placed in food.  This species is ancient – known as long ago as 300 BC in Greece where it “purged and cured the mad or melancholicke daughters of Praetus with the roots thereof.” (Parkinson, 1629) Grown in the Eichstätt Garden, the garden of Johann Konrad von Gemmingen, prince bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria, c. 1600.  In Middle Ages petals thrown on floor to drive out evil and ward off power of witches.  Gerard recommended it for curing poisoned animals. Sorcerers made themselves invisible by tossing the powdered plant in the air.  The German name of Schneerose (snow rose) is perhaps more appropriate.

  • Helleborus orientalis Lenten rose Z 4-9

    Creamy white, waxy saucers

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Creamy white, waxy saucers in early spring, evergreen foliage. Poison.

    Size: 18” x18”
    Care: moist soil in part shade. Deer resistant.
    Native: Asia Minor

    The name Helleborus is Greek from hellein meaning “to kill” and bora meaning “food” referring to the plant’s poisonous qualities if placed in food.  Found in India in 1839.  Favorite plant of Gertrude Jekyll, mother of the mixed perennial border, (1848-1931) planted with Daphne shrubs and Dog tooth violet in her personal garden at Munstead Wood. By 1900 purple varieties too.