Perennials & Biennials

Showing 233–240 of 471 results

  • Hosta ventricosa Z 3-8

    rich lavender bells periscope over heart-shaped leaves

    $11.95/bareroot

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    In late summer rich lavender bells periscope over heart-shaped, prominently veined foliage.

    Can not ship to: Maryland

    Size: 20" x 36"
    Care: Part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil. Tolerate Walnut toxicity
    Native: China
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds
    Awards: Received England's Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Japanese called Hostas  Giboshi and ate young leaves in spring as a vegetable Hosta was named for Dr. Nicholas Host (1761-1834) the physician to the emperor of Austria.   Hostas, cultivated since at least the 12th century in East Asia.  Empress Josephine grew this at Malmaison. Redoute, Josephine’s botanical illustrator, painted H. ventricosa in 1805.

  • Hydrangea quercifolia Oakleaf hydrangea Z 5-9

    Large blossoms, white turning pink and dark rose as the season advances. In fall the oak-shaped leaves become burgundy.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Large blossoms, white turning pink and dark rose as the season advances. In fall the oak-shaped leaves become burgundy.

    Size: 4-5’ x 10’ slowly spreading by suckers.
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: SE US

    Collected in central Georgia by William Bartram c. 1775. Bartram, “most significant American nature writer before Thoreau,” traveled the wilderness of the SE, then colonies, now US, mostly alone, sometimes with his famous father, John Bartram. William wrote about and painted the flora, native Americans, animals and insects.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Iberis sempervirens Candytuft Z 5-9

    Pure white flowers in April and May

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Pure white flowers in April and May on this evergreen subshrub.

    Size: 6-12" x 24"
    Care: Full sun in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Southern Europe
    Wildlife Value: nectar source for gray hairstreak butterfly
    Awards: England's Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Iberis is Latin for Spain, “Iberia” the country where the plant was first discovered.   The common name Candytuft comes from Candia, Crete where the plant grew.  In 1623 Parkinson, included the Candytuft in his Garden of Pleasant Flowers, wrote it: ” is not so sharpe biting in taste…and therefore is not to be used in medicines.”   Iin American gardens since 1700’s.

  • Iliamna remota Kankakee mallow Z 5-8

    mallow-like pale pink flowers all summer

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Gorgeous mallow-like ballerina-pink flowers all summer and fall.

    Size: 4' x 18"
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Endemic to Illinois.

    Introduced to gardens by Edward Lee Greene (1843-1915).  Greene lived in Wisconsin and served in the Civil War as part of a Wisconsin regiment.  He migrated west, first to Colorado and then to California, where he collected many plants new to cultivation and taught botany at UC-Berkeley.  Greene may have been America’s most knowledgable botanic historian.

  • Ipomopsis aggregata Standing cypress, Skyrocket, Scarlet gilia Z 4-11 Reseeding biennial

    Showy red trumpets along leafless stem brighten summer-fall garden

    $8.95/pot

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    Showy red trumpets along leafless stem brighten summer-fall garden

    Size: 3-5’ x 12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: west from ND, south to TX to the Pacific.
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, Swallowtail butterflies and flocks of hummingbirds. Deer resistant.

    Collected by Meriwether Lewis on the Lolo Trail June 26 1806.

  • Iris ‘Monsignor’ syn. Anne’s Iris Z 4-8

    Classic purple iris with sunny throat and white stripes on the beard, blossoms in late May to early June

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Classic purple iris with sunny throat and white stripes on the beard,  blossoms in late May to early June

    Size: 15" x 8"
    Care: moist well-drained soil in full to part sun

    This Iris was growing in the gardens when we moved to Heritage Flower Farm in 1992.    The property has been owned continuously by the Patterson family from 1880 until 1992.  Anne Patterson began gardening here in 1927 as a young bride, so I call these “Anne’s Iris.”  In June, 2003 Anne turned 104 years old.  She passed away on August 1, 2003.  Hybridized by French nursery Vilmorin-Andrieux et Cie, a legendary seed house started in late 1700’s.  Some firm members specialized in Irises from the 1880’s.  The firm introduced ‘Monsignor’ in 1907, one of its earlier hybrids.

  • Iris ‘Wabash’ Z 5-8

    Pure white standards with deep violet falls edged in white

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Pure white standards with deep violet falls edged in white in late May-early June.

    Size: 24" x 8"
    Care: sun in moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant.

    Hybridized by Williamson in 1936. Dykes award (best iris) winner 1940.

  • Iris ‘Polar King’ Z 4-8

    Pure white with yellow center, vigorous reblooming iris.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Pure white with yellow center, vigorous reblooming iris.  Blooms spring and again, spectacularly, in fall.

    Size: 34”x8” Vigorous & spreads by rhizomes.
    Care: Sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. In July-August lift & divide every 2 to 3 years; discard mushy rhizomes.
    Awards: 1st rebloomer awarded American Iris Society Award of Merit

    Iris is named after the Greek goddess who accompanied the souls of women to the Elysian fields by way of the rainbow.  Her footprints left flowers the colors of the rainbow.   Iris means “eye of heaven.” The iris is the flower of chivalry, having “a sword for its leaf and a lily for its heart.” Ruskin.   This hybrid bred by Thomas Donahue of Newton Lower Falls, Massachusetts. He 1st showed it at the Massachusetts Horticultural Society flower show in October of 1931 where it won several awards.  Registered in 1939.