Perennials & Biennials

Showing 241–248 of 471 results

  • Iris cristata Crested iris Z 4-8

    Lavender, blue or white in May, ornamental foliage

    $8.75/pot

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    Lavender, blue or white in May, ornamental foliage

    Size: 6” x spreader
    Care: Part to full shade in moist well-drained soil to well-drained
    Native: Maryland to Georgia, west to Missouri

    Cherokee applied a salve of the pulverized root to ulcers and made an infusion to remedy liver ailments. 1st collected by Rev. John Banister who moved to colonial Virginia in 1678. A gunman mistakenly shot and killed him while he collected plants. Grown by Jefferson.

  • Iris domestica syn. Belamcanda chinensis Blackberry lily Z 5-10

    Orange spotted flowers in summer followed by black seed clusters

    $9.25/bareroot

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    Orange spotted flowers in summer followed by black seed clusters

    Size: 18-36”x 10”
    Care: sun, moist well drained soil
    Native: China and Japan

    The Blackberry lily was cultivated in China as a medicinal plant as long ago as 120 B.C.  It was introduced to England from China in 1823.  Jefferson grew this at Monticello.
    The root of the Blackberry Lily, Belamcanda chinensis, a member of the Iris family which produces attractive lily-like flowers, is known as the Chinese herb She-gan. Seeds of the plant were collected by Jesuit missionaries in China and sent to Europe by the 1730s. It was cultivated in Linnaeus’  botanical garden in Uppsala by 1748, and in English gardens by at least 1759. The plant was known in American gardens as early as 1825.

  • Iris florentina Florentine iris, White flag Z 3-9

    Sweetly fragrant, tall, soft white bearded iris

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Sweetly fragrant, tall, soft white bearded iris with beards of yellow,flowering in June

    Size: 24-30” x 18-24”
    Care: sun in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Italy and southern France

    English herbalist John Gerard grew it by 1596.  Grown in the Eichstätt Garden, the garden of Johann Konrad von Gemmingen, prince bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria, c. 1600.   Its rhizome is the source of dried orris root. Dig in late summer, peel, chop, dry, age, and then grind into a powder which is a scent fixative for perfumes and potpourris and flavoring for Chianti wine. Orris root has a violet-like aroma. Add powder directly to potpourris. Mix with oil prior to adding to perfumes.

  • Iris graminea Grass-leaved iris, Plum-scented iris Z 4-8

    Charming beardless spuria iris of purple styles, violet falls and ivory hafts with purple veins, blooming in June below the gras-like foliage

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Charming beardless spuria iris of purple styles, violet falls and ivory hafts with purple veins, blooming in June below the gras-like foliage

    Size: 9-16” x 9-16”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: from Spain to Russia & Caucasus in Asia. But now endangered in Czechoslovakia and extinct in Germany.
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Graminea means grass. Common name of Plum-scented for its fruity, plum fragrance. In gardens since at least 1568. Planted at Cambridge Botanic Garden in 1733.

  • Iris missouriensis Western blue flag, Rocky Mountain iris Z 3-8

     In spring variegated, violet blue iris flowers, up to 4 per stem. Each flower has 6 perianth segments, three elongated spreading to reflexed falls have a central dark yellow-orange stripe and diverging blue lines on a white background, and three erect, more narrow, lilac-purple to dark blue standards.

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    In spring variegated, violet blue iris flowers, up to 4 per stem. Each flower has 6 perianth segments, three elongated spreading to reflexed falls have a central dark yellow-orange stripe and diverging blue lines on a white background, and three erect, more narrow, lilac-purple to dark blue standards.

    Size: 12-24” x 9-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to moist soil. Divide regularly.
    Native: Alberta and British Columbia, from Minnesota to Washington south to California east to New Mexico
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant. Attracts hummingbirds, provides pollen to bees.

    Named for the Missouri River although ironically Lewis collected it along the Blackfoot River in today’s Montana on July 5, 1806.
    Paiute Indians of eastern California and southeastern Oregon made ear drops to remedy earaches with a decoction if the Iris roots.

     

  • Iris siberica Siberian Iris Z 4-9

    sword shaped leaves with blue, purple or lilac Iris flowers

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Narrow, sword shaped leaves with blue, purple, or white Iris flowers in June.

    Size: 3-4' x S 12" and spreading
    Care: Full sun moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant, Walnut toxicity resistant and drought tolerant.
    Native: Eastern Siberia
    Awards: England's Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Iris is named after the Greek goddess who accompanied the souls of women to the Elysian Fields by way of the rainbow.  Her footprints left flowers the colors of the rainbow.   Iris means the “eye of heaven.” The iris is the flower of chivalry, having “a sword for its leaf and a lily for its heart.” Ruskin. Siberian Irises first cultivated in European gardens in the 1500’s.  Blue Siberian Iris was introduced to the U.S. in 1796.  Cultivated by Washington at Mount Vernon.

  • Iris versicolor Blue flag Z 3-9

    Purple, lavender or blue flowers in June

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Purple, lavender or blue flowers in June

    Size: 36" x 12"
    Care: sun, moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Eastern United States, Wisconsin native

    Iris is named after the Greek goddess who accompanied the souls of women to the Elysian Fields by way of the rainbow.  Her footprints left flowers the colors of the rainbow.   Iris means the eye of heaven. Omaha Indians used the roots topically to cure earaches. Other tribes applied a poultice to cure sores and bruises. Root is poisonous. Cultivated in gardens since the 1700’s.

  • Kalimeris incisa syn. Asteromoea , Kalimeris integrifolia False aster Z 4-8

    Pale lavender single daisies bloom all summer

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Another blooming machine. Pale lavender single daisies that bloom all summer – from July – September.

    Size: 24” x 18"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to dry soil.
    Native: Japan, northern China & Siberia

    Collected before 1836.