Perennials & Biennials

Showing 225–232 of 471 results

  • Heuchera versicolor syn. H. rubescens var. versicolor Pink alumroot Z 4-10

    Tiny pink bells on narrow inflorescence blooming mid to late summer

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    Tiny pink bells on narrow inflorescence blooming mid to late summer

    Size: 8-12” x 12"
    Care: prefers part shade in moist well-drained to well drained soil, can grow in sun with moist soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: southwestern US
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds

    First collected in 1904 on damp, shady bluffs of the Black Range in New Mexico, accd. to Edward Lee Greene.

    The roots are astringent and can also be used as an alum substitute, used in fixing dyes. Was also used medicinally for fever, diarrhea, venereal disease, liver ailments, eyewash, colic and animal care.  Heuchera is named for Johann Heinrich von Heucher (1677-1747), while rubescens means becoming red or reddish, and versicolor means variously colored.

  • Heuchera x brixoides  ‘Caldwell’  Z 4-8

    Small pink bells surround top 6” of the wiry, erect stems in late spring-mid-summer.

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    $9.25/ea

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    Small pink bells surround top 6” of the wiry, erect stems in late spring-mid-summer.

    Size: 12-18” x 6-8”  
    Care: part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil

    I do not know which Heuchera this is. This  was growing here when I moved here around 1995.  We bought the property from spry 93 year old Anne Patterson, “for sale by owner.” I cannot imagine that she was buying new plants in her 90’s so I’m making an educated guess that it is at least 40 years old.  It does not set seed, not unusual for a hybrid.  But we like it so much that  we’ve divided it several times over the last couple of years to make enough to sell. Try as I might I cannot identify it but I’ve narrowed it down to a hybrid called brixoides, of which there are innumerable different selections.  I’ve named it ‘Caldwell” for the crossroads where our nursery is located, originally named for the 1st settlers, Joseph and Sara Caldwell c. 1860.

  • Hibiscus moscheutos Rose mallow Z 5-10

    Decadent platters of crimson, rose or white

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Decadent platters of crimson, rose or white with cerise centers in August and September on 6′ tall, very sturdy stalks. Look tropical, but they’re hardy.

    Size: 8' x 3'
    Care: Sun, moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Southern U.S.
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies and hummingbirds

    One Native American tribe used this plant to cure inflammed bladders. 1st collected by English planthunter Rev. John Banister in colonial Virginia c. 1680.  A gunman mistakenly shot and killed him while he collected plants.  Bloomed for Jefferson at Monticello in July, 1767.

  • Holodiscus discolor Creambush, Ocean spray Z 5-10

    Multistemmed shrub with dense, elegant pyramidal clusters of arching cream-colored flowers in early to mid summer. Leaves tint red in fall.

    $15.95/bareroot

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    Multi-stemmed shrub with dense, elegant pyramidal clusters of arching cream-colored flowers in early to mid summer. Leaves tint red in fall.

    Size: 4-8’ x 8’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Montana to Colorado west to the Pacific.
    Wildlife Value: nectar for hummingbirds, food for butterfly caterpillars, bird habitat.

    Hard and durable wood was used to make digging sticks, spears, harpoon shafts, bows, and arrows by nearly all coastal Native groups. A few used the wood to make sticks to barbeque salmon, fish hooks, needles for weaving and knitting, Pegs were made to use like nails. Others made wood intoarmor plating and canoe paddles.
    A few Natives made an infusion of boiled fruit to cure diarrhea, measles, chickenpox and as a blood tonic.  Collected by Meriwether Lewis in today’s Idaho on the Clearwater River, May 29, 1806 en route back east on  the Lewis and Clark Expedition.

  • Horminum pyrenaicum   Dragonmouth, Pyrenean Dead-nettle   Z 5-9

    Deep purple salvia-like blooms in April to May above rosettes of wide, flat leaves

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    $11.95/bareroot

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    Deep purple salvia-like blooms late spring to early summer above rosettes of wide, flat leaves

     

    Size: 8-16” x 12” 
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil.  Drought tolerant.
    Native: Pyrenees & Alps
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and birds. Deer and rabbit resistant.

    Before 1753, Linnaeus.

  • Hosta ‘Blue Cadet’

    Lavender flowers late in season

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Lavender flowers late in season

    Size: 35-40” x 36”
    Care: part to full shade in moist well-drained soil
    Awards: Nancy Minks Award in 1986

    Hosta was named for Dr. Nicholas Host (1761 – 1834) the physician to the emperor of Austria and an expert on grasses. This cultivar ranked as one of the top 7 hostas and one of the top 2 hostas with blue foliage. Hybridized by Aden in 1974.

  • Hosta ‘fortunei ‘Aureomarginata’ Z 3-9

    One of the most popular Hosta varieties.  Handsome, broad, ribbed, wavy, green foliage with yellow margins.  Lavender, trumpet-shaped flowers rise on scapes above the leaves in summer.

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    $9.75/ea

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    One of the most popular Hosta varieties.  Handsome, broad, ribbed, wavy, green foliage with yellow margins.  Lavender, trumpet-shaped flowers rise on scapes above the leaves in summer.

    Size: 12-16” x 18-24” 
    Care: shade to part-shade in moist well-drained soil.  Tolerant Black walnut toxins

    Hosta named for Austrian botanist Nicholas Thomas Host (1761-1834) in 1812. This variety registered in 1987.

  • Hosta lancifolia Lanceleaf Hosta Z 4-9

    Glossy, midgreen lance shaped leaves with lavender trumpets soil

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Glossy, midgreen lance shaped leaves with lavender trumpets in August and September.

    Size: 18" x 30"
    Care: sun to shade in moist well-drained soil. Tolerant of Walnut toxicity
    Native: Japan
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds

    Japanese called Hostas Giboshi and ate young leaves in spring as a vegetable. Hosta was named for Dr. Nicholas Host (1761-1834) the physician to the emperor of Austria. Hostas, cultivated since at least the 12th century in Asia, were first described for Europeans by Englebert Kaempfer in 1712, doctor for the Dutch East Indian Company on Dechima Island. H. lancifolia drawings date to 1690.