Perennials & Biennials

Showing 201–208 of 548 results

  • Epimedium grandiflorum Barrenwort, Bishop’s hat Z 5-8

    White-lavender flowers in May atop wiry stems look like fantastical birds with too many wings, or a four-cornered bishop’s hat.

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    White-lavender flowers in May atop wiry stems look like fantastical birds with too many wings, or a four-cornered bishop’s hat.  Ornamental heart-shaped leaves and red stems.

    Size: 6-12” x 18” slow spreader
    Care: shade to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil. Once roots established, valuable in dry shade
    Native: China, Japan & Korea

    Its Chinese name is “Yin Yang Ho” meaning “Licentious goat herb, “ because allegedly an aphrodisiac for goats!  In China & Japan thought to remedy impotence, liver ailments & all age related maladies.  In Western gardens since 1834.

  • Epimedium x rubrum syn. Epimedium alpinum var. rubrum Red barrenwort Z 4-8

    small, star-shaped, rosey-red flowers dance on the ends of wiry-thin stems

    $11.95/pot

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    In mid-spring small, star-shaped, rosey-red flowers dance on the ends of wiry-thin stems about one foot high. Red-flushed foliage follows the flowers, the more sun, the more red on leaves.  Wonderful groundcover.  Cross between Epimedium grandiflorum and Epimedium alpinum

    Size: 16” x 24” slow spreading
    Care: Sun to shade in most any soil but best in part shade – one of most adaptable plants
    Wildlife Value: deer resistant
    Awards: Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanic Garden Great Plant Pick

    1st described in 1853 in Belgique Hort. iii. 33. I. 6.

  • Erigeron aureus Alpine yellow fleabane Z 5-8

    White hairs cover frosted-looking basil leaves making this worthy of any garden even without flowers, but then its school bus yellow daisies flower from spring through fall.

    $8.75/pot

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    White hairs cover frosted-looking basil leaves making this worthy of any garden even without flowers, but then its school bus yellow daisies flower from spring through fall.

    Size: 3-4” x 3”
    Care: sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Cascade Mountains from Alberta to State of Washington
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and birds

    1st described in literature in 1884.

  • Erigeron compositus Cutleaf daisy, Dwarf mountain fleabane Z 3-8

    Petite daisies with cushion-shaped grey, woolly leaves

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    Cushion shaped plant with wooly grey leaves topped by small bluish, pink or white rays like a daisy with a yellow center. Flowers in June-July.

    Size: 6” x 6-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil.
    Native: all of western No. America from prairies to alpine slopes.

    Thompson Indians from British Columbia chewed on the plant then spit on sores to remedy skin ailments. They also made a decoction of the plant, mixed with any weeds for broken bones. 1st collected by Meriwether Lewis in 1806 near Lewiston Idaho. Erigeron comes from Greek er meaning “spring” and geron for “old man” due to some of these species having white downy hair like an old man, in spring.

  • Erinus alpinus Fairy foxglove, Alpine balsam Z 4-7

    May- July violet, pink or white 5-petaled stars

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    May- July violet, pink or white 5-petaled stars (not resembling floxgloves) , self-sows. Rock garden plant.

    Size: 3” x 4” spreads
    Care: sun to part shade in well drained soil
    Native: Alps & Pyrenees
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Erinus comes from Greek er meaning “spring,” for the time when this plant blooms.  Collected by 1753.  Wm. Robinson, father of mixed perennial border, called this a “pretty alpine plant.”

  • Erodium manescavii syn. Erodium manescani Heron’s bill Z. 5-8

    Magenta saucer-shaped petals April-November. Seed’s tail like a corkscrew

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Magenta saucer-shaped petals April-November. Seed’s tail like a corkscrew

    Size: 12-18” x 8”
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Pyrenees

    Erodium is Greek meaning “heron,” because the seed capsule resembles a heron’s head and bill. Collected before 1889. According to William Robinson, father of the mixed perennial border, this is “most showy (and) throws up strong flower stalks…each with 7 to 15 purplish flowers.”

  • Eryngium amethystinum Amethyst sea holly Z. 3-8

    Metallic amethyst stems, spiny bracts and cone-shaped flower in July and August

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    Metallic amethyst stems, spiny bracts and cone-shaped flower in July and August

    Size: 28” x 28”
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil, drought tolerant
    Native: Italy & southern Alps
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & butterflies, birds eat seeds. Deer & rabbit resistant
    Awards: Great Plant Pick Award from Elizabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden.

    Garden cultivation since 1648. Long prized for its metallic luster.

  • Eryngium giganteum Miss Wilmott’s ghost Z 5-8

    oval thistles top prickly green, turning steely blue, silvery, prickly bracts

    $11.95/bareroot

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    In summer, oval thistles top prickly green, turning steely blue, silvery, prickly bracts.  Stems turn steel blue too.  Dramatic cut flower, fresh or dried.

    Size: 36" x 24"
    Care: Full sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: Caucasus Mountains
    Awards: England's Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Named for Ellen Wilmott, a wealthy, eccentric English gardener who reputedly dropped seeds of this plant as she passed her neighbors’ gardens.  It came up after she had passed – Miss Wilmott’s ghost.  Her personality also reputedly resembled the prickly plant.  Introduced to England from its native Caucasus Mountains in 1820.