Perennials & Biennials

Showing 101–104 of 495 results

  • Calylophus serrulatus Yellow sundrops, Shrubby evening primrose Z 4-9

    Lemon yellow silky petals bloom late spring to early fall on this tough-as-nails native

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    Calylophus serrulatus  Yellow sundrops, Shrubby evening primrose   Z 4-9
    Lemon yellow silky petals bloom late spring to early fall on this tough-as-nails native

    Size: 9-18” x 12-15”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil, drought tolerant
    Native: Great Plains: Central Canada to TX, Michigan to Montana, WI native

    1st described in 1818 by Thomas Nuttall, English planthunter who collected hundreds of “new” plants in North America. Caly is Greek for calyx; lophos for “the back of the neck; crest of a hill or helmet”  serrulatus means “minutely serrate” or “saw-toothed” describing the leaf margins.

  • Camassia quamash Wild Hyacinth, Leichtlin’s Camass Z 4-8

    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

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    $7.95/bareroot

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    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

    Size: 15” x 12"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, well-drained soil
    Native: Pacific Northwest
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer & rabbit resistant

    First documented by Lewis & Clark near the Nez Perce village in the Cascade Mountains. Nez Perce hunters gave Clark a cake made with Camassia.  Important food crop for First Americans. Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll 1908.

  • Campanula carpatica Tussock bellflower, Carpathian bellflower Z 3-8

    In summer blue, violet or white bells

    $7.95/bareroot

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    Campanula carpatica  Tussock bellflower, Carpathian bellflower  Z 3-8
    In summer blue, violet or white bells, excellent at front of border.

    Size: 12” x 12-24”
    Care: Sun moist well-drained soil, tolerant of Walnut toxicity
    Native: Carpathian mountains in central Europe
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Campanula is Latin meaning little bell.  In 1629 Parkinson described campanulas as “cherished for the beautie of their flowers…”  Young roots were eaten in “sallets.”   Introduced to European gardens from the Carpathian Mountains in 1774. Sold by McMahon’s Philadelphia nursery in the early 1800’s.  Probably cultivated by Jefferson at Monticello.

  • Campanula collina Dark blue bellflower Z. 5-8

    In summer dark blue-purple bells on upright stems on clumps of this bellflower.

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    Campanula collina   Dark blue bellflower Z. 5-8
    In summer dark blue-purple bells on upright stems on clumps of this bellflower.

    Size: 6-12” x 8”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained
    Native: western Asia, Turkey, Caucasus Mountains

    Campanula is Latin meaning “little bell.” Collina means “on hills.” Collected before 1826.