Perennials & Biennials

Showing 201–208 of 471 results

  • Geranium pratense Meadow Cranesbill Z 4-8

    Bluish violet cup-shaped flowers in early to midsummer

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Bluish violet cup-shaped flowers in early to midsummer, repeating if cutback.

    Size: 24-36" x 24"
    Care: Full sun in moist to moderate well-drained soil, tolerated Walnut toxicity
    Native: Northern Europe

    Geranium is Greek meaning “crane” referring to the shape of fruit resembling the bill of a crane.   Cultivated in America since the 1800’s and in English cottage gardens long before that.

  • Geranium richardsonii Richardson’s geranium Z 4-8

    White flowers with purple veins

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    White flowers with purple veins flowering in spring to early summer

    Size: 18” x 18”
    Care: part sun to shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: All western Canada south to California, Arizona and New Mexico

    Geranium is Greek meaning “crane” referring to the shape of fruit resembling the bill of a crane.  Cheyenne cured nosebleeds with this plant and Navajo considered it a “life medicine.” 1st collected by Thomas Drummond (1780-1835) in the Canadian Rockies.  Drummond collected in the Franklin Expedition in Canada, then in Colorado and Texas before dying mysteriously in Cuba.

  • Geranium sanguineum var. lancastriense Bloody Cranesbill Z 4-8

    Pastel pink flowers with rose colored veins bloom all summer.

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    Pastel pink flowers with rose colored veins bloom all summer making a reliable groundcover.

    Size: 8" x12"
    Care: sun to part shade, moist well-drained soil. Tolerates Walnut toxicity.
    Native: Walney Island, Cumbria England

    Geranium is Greek meaning “crane”  referring to the shape of fruit resembling the bill of a crane.  Discovered on British Walney Island in 1732.

  • Geranium wlassovianum Wlassov’s cranesbill Z 4-8

    Flowers dusky violet with white eyes, June to September, non-stop. Ornamental, lobed leaves, red in spring & fall.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Flowers dusky violet with white eyes, June to August. Ornamental, lobed leaves, red in spring & fall.

    Size: 24" x 24"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil. Tolerant Walnut toxicity.
    Native: Siberia, Russia, Mongolia & China
    Awards: Elizabeth Carey Miller Botanic Garden, Great Plant Award.

    Collected before 1822.

  • Geranium x – Johnson’s Blue Z 3-8

    Long blooming blue flowered saucers

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Long blooming (July to September) if sheared back after 1st flowering, blue flowered saucers & in fall blazing crimson foliage

    Size: 18” x 15”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Cross of G. himalayense and G. pretense bred by A.T. Johnson, schoolmaster, writer & photographer, in his garden in Conwy Valley, Wales in 1945.

  • Geum chiloensis x ‘Mrs. Bradshaw’ Z 5-9

    Showy double scarlet flowers from June to August

    $9.25/bareroot

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    Showy double scarlet flowers from June to August

    Size: 20" x 24"
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil, cut back after blooming to rebloom into fall.

    The species collected by Alexander Cruickshank in So. America in 1820’s.  ‘Mrs. Bradshaw ‘ listed in a book authored by H.H. Thomas in 1915.  Received England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

  • Geum triflorum Prairie smoke Z 1-6

    Pale purplish to pink cup-shaped flowers in spring

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Pale purplish to pink bud-shaped flowers in spring followed by long silky seed heads – like magic.

    Size: 12" x 12"
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil, drought tolerant.
    Native: all of northern No. America, Wisconsin native

    Introduced to gardens in 1609. Many Native American medicinal uses. Blackfoot, to cure coughs, skin sores and wounds, swollen eyes, canker sores, and fuzzy thinking. Okanagan-Colville women made a love potion from the roots, and cured vaginal yeast infections.

  • Gillenia trifoliata Syn. Porteranthus trifoliata Indian physic Z 5-9

    White stars flutter as butterflies atop wire-like red stems in June. In fall foliage turns red. One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated 94 (2013)

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    OUT OF STOCK

    White stars flutter as butterflies atop wire-like red stems in June. In fall foliage turns red. One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated 94 (2013)

    Size: 3’ x 2’
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: from Canada to Georgia
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit and Great Plant Pick Award from Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden.

    Gillenia named in honor of “an obscure German botanist or physician of the the 17th century, A. Gille or Gillenius.” The Cherokee chewed the root to alleviate bee stings and toothaches. Small sips of the tea relieved asthma and colds, (larger quantities lethal.) 1st collected by Rev. John Banister who moved to colonial Virginia in 1678. A gunman mistakenly shot and killed him while he collected plants. Offered for sale in Bartram Garden’s 1783 Broadside, America’s 1st plant catalog. Bailey (1913) described this as “excellent graceful plant for the mixed border, rockeries or other hardy gardens.” Sanders described it as a “graceful spirea-like plant.” 1913.