Perennials & Biennials

Showing 185–192 of 511 results

  • Eupatorium purpureum syn. Eutrochium purpureum Sweet Joe Pye weed Z 4-9

    July - September large dusty rose blooms invite butterflies.

    $12.75/bareroot

    Buy

    July – September large dusty rose domes of bunches of flowers

    Size: 5-6' x 3'
    Care: Sun, moist, alkaline soil
    Native: Eastern U.S., Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Nectar and/or pollen for numerous bees, butterflies, and wasps

    Joe Pye weed named after an Indian medicine man who used the plant in New England to cure typhus.  Meskwaki Indian men “nibbled (Joe Pye weed) when speaking to women when they are in the wooing mood.”  This had the power of “fetching” women. Good luck when gambling for the Potawatomi.  Oneidas used it to cure fever. Mahuna Indians of So. California made an infusion of the root to cure colds and coughs.  Colonists used the plant to cure dropsy, gravel, gout and rheumatism.  Collected by Rev. John Banister (1649-1692) who moved to colonial Virginia in 1678.  A gunman mistakenly shot and killed him while he collected plants.  Offered for sale in Bartram Garden’s 1783 Broadside, America’s 1st plant catalog.

  • Eupatorium sessilifolium Upland boneset Z 3-8

    Showy flat-topped, white flower clusters July to September

    $12.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Showy flat-topped, white flower clusters July to September

    Size: 3-4’ x 12-24”
    Care: Shade to part shade in moist well-drained soil to dry soil, drought tolerant
    Native: most of eastern half of US, Wisconsin native but rare and endangered
    Wildlife Value: Nectar attracts bees and butterflies. Food for caterpillars of several moths. Deer & rabbit resistant.

    Collected before 1753.

  • Euphorbia colorata syn. E. collorata Perennial poinsettia

    Chartreuse bracts in spring and redish stems and leaves in autumn.

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Chartreuse bracts in spring and redish stems and leaves in autumn.

    Size: 12-16 x 12
    Care: sun in dry to moist well-drained soil

    Root used as purgative according to Gould’s Dictionary of New Medical Terms (1905).  Collected on the Mexican Boundary Expedition c. 1850.

  • Euphorbia corollata Flowering spurge Z 4-7

    Small white flowers (bracts), like a baby's breath but better, July & August.  One of the best prairie natives, but slow to mature.

    $10.25/pot

    Buy

    Small white flowers (bracts), like a baby’s breath but better, July & August. One of the best prairie natives but slow to mature.

    Size: 36' x 24" spreading slowly
    Care: sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil. Drought resistant.
    Native: Canada to Florida and west through the plains, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: deer resistant. Its pollen & nectar feed endangered Karner Blue butterfly as well as other small butterflies, numerous bees, wasps and flies. Several birds eat the seeds.

    A favorite medicine among native Americans.  Cherokee rubbed the plant’s juice on skin to cure cancer.  Also used to remedy tooth aches and gonorrhea.  Winnebago cut a 2.5” long root to clear stomach and steeped leaves for a baby’s colic. According to Breck (1851), “One of the most elegant species peculiar to the United States.”

  • Euphorbia myrsinites Donkeytail spurge Z 5-8

    Chartreuse umbels at stem tips contrast succulent blue-gray foliage in early spring

    $12.75/bareroot

    Buy

    Chartreuse umbels at stem tips contrast succulent blue-gray foliage in early spring

    Can not ship to: Colorado.

    Size: 4” x 12”
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil, drought resistant
    Native: Western Asia
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Euphorbia was named for Euphorbus, physician of Numibian King Juba, father of Ptolemy (c. 50 B.C. – 20 A.D.)  Reputedly Euphorbus used spurge to remedy the King’s enlarged stomach.   Euphorbus’ brother was Augustus Caesar’s physician.  Myrsinites is a Greek word meaning “resembling myrtle.”  This plant described by Swiss botanical scholar Conrad Gesner in his book Horti Germaniae published in 1541.

  • Euphorbia polychroma Cushion spurge syn. Euphorbia epithymoides Z 4-9

    May - June flashy chartreuse flowers.  In fall foliage turns orangey-red.

    $12.95/bareroot

    Buy

    May – June flashy chartreuse flowers.  In fall foliage turns orangey-red.

    Size: 16" x 24"
    Care: Sun, moist well-drained humusy soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Central and Southern Europe
    Awards: England's Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Polychroma means many colors referring to the fact that the plant changes colors with yellow-chartreuse flowers in spring and red foliage in fall. Named and described by Swedish botanist Linnaeus 1753.

  • Fibigia clypeata Roman shields Z 5-7

    Yellow spring flowers – early summer, followed by small, oval “silver dollars.”

    $10.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Yellow spring flowers – early summer, followed by small, oval “silver dollars” on erect stems. 

    Size: 18” x 12-15”
    Care: sun well-drained soil Self-seeds freely
    Native: Southern Europe
    Wildlife Value: source of nectar and pollen for bees and other insects
    Size: Used for their ornamental seed pods. Harvest either when 1st form for fuzzy grey-green color or when mature with outer skin removed for translucent, silver shield

    In gardens before 1753.

     

  • Filipendula rubra Queen of the Prairie Z 3-9

    Extraordinary frothy pink plumes, like cotton candy, blooming in midsummer

    $12.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Extraordinary frothy pink plumes, like cotton candy, blooming in midsummer

    Size: 4-6’ x 4-5'
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to moist soil
    Native: US East coast west to MN s to MO and NC, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: This creates pollen but not nectar limiting the pollinators to bees and flies (Butterflies and wasps want nectar.).

    Meskwaki Indians used it for heart ailments and as an aphrodisiac. Although the plant’s name has been changed five times, this was 1st described in 1768.