Perennials & Biennials

Showing 185–192 of 471 results

  • Euphorbia colorata syn. E. collorata Perennial poinsettia

    Chartreuse bracts in spring and redish stems and leaves in autumn.

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    Chartreuse bracts in spring and redish stems and leaves in autumn.

    Size: 12-16 x 12
    Care: sun in dry to moist well-drained soil

    Root used as purgative acc’d. To Gould’s Dictionary of New Medical Terms (1905).  Collected on the Mexican Boundary Expedition c. 1850.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Euphorbia corollata Flowering spurge Z 4-7

    Small white flowers (bracts), like a baby's breath

    $8.75/pot

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    Small white flowers (bracts), like a baby’s breath but better, July & August. One of the best prairie natives but slow to mature.

    Size: 36' x 24"
    Care: sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil. Drought tolerant & deer resistant.
    Native: Canada to Florida and west through the plains, Wisconsin native

    Euphorbia was named for Euphorbus, physician of Numibian King Juba (c. 50 B.C. – 20 A.D.)  Reputedly Euphorbus used  spurge to remedy the King’s enlarged stomach.   Euphorbus’ brother was Augustus Caesar’s physician. Corollata  means “like a corolla.”   A favorite medicine among Native Americans.  Cherokee rubbed the plant’s juice on skin to cure cancer.  Also used to remedy toothache and gonorrhea.  According to Breck (1851): “One of the most elegant species peculiar to the United States.”

  • Euphorbia myrsinites Donkeytail spurge Z 5-8

    Chartreuse umbels tip succulent blue-gray foliage

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Chartreuse umbels tip succulent blue-gray foliage in spring. Foliage attractive all season.  Great for groundcover or rock garden.

    Can not ship to: Colorado.

    Size: 4” x 12”
    Care: Sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil. Drought tolerant & deer resistant
    Native: Western Asia
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Euphorbia was named for Euphorbus, physician of Numibian King Juba (c. 50 B.C. – 20 A.D.)  Reputedly Euphorbus used  spurge to remedy the King’s enlarged stomach.   Euphorbus’ brother was Augustus Caesar’s physician.  Myrsinites is a Greek word meaning “resembling myrtle.”  This plant described by Swiss botanical scholar Conrad Gesner in his book Horti Germaniae published in 1541.

  • Euphorbia polychroma Cushion spurge Z 4-9

    dazzling chartreuse flowers in spring

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Mound cloaked with dazzling chartreuse flowers in spring followed by red, purple and orange foliage in fall.

    Size: 16" x 24"
    Care: Sun, moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Drought tolerant & deer resistant
    Native: Central and Southern Europe
    Awards: England's Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Euphorbia was named for Euphorbus, physician of Nubian King Juba, father of Ptolemy (50 B.C.-20 A.D.)  Euphorbus’ brother was Augustus Caesar’s physician.  Cultivation of this plant in America since 1800’s.

  • Fibigia clypeata Roman shields Z 5-

    Yellow spring flowers – early summer, followed by small, oval “silver dollars.”

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Yellow spring flowers – early summer, followed by small, oval “silver dollars.”

    Size: 18” x 12-15”
    Care: sun well-drained soil Self-seeds freely
    Native: Southern Europe
    Size: Used for their ornamental seed pods. Harvest either when 1st form for fuzzy grey-green color or when mature with outer skin removed for translucent, silver shield

    In gardens before 1753.

     

  • Filipendula rubra Queen of the Prairie Z 3-9

    Frothy pink plumes in midsummer

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Extraordinary frothy pink plumes, like cotton candy, midsummer

    Size: 4-6’ x 4-5'
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to moist soil
    Native: eastern U.S., Wisconsin native

    Name is Latin filum pendulus meaning “hanging by a thread” referring to threads on the roots of Filipendula. Meskwaki Indians used it for heart ailments and as an aphrodisiac.   Grown in American gardens since 1900.

  • Filipendula vulgaris Dropwort or Meadowsweet Z 4-9

    Loose ivory corymbs early to mid-summer atop fern-like foliage

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Loose ivory corymbs early to mid-summer atop fern-like foliage. When it’s not blooming you’d think it is a fern.

    Size: 24" x 18"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe, north and central Asia

    Filipendula is Latin from filum meaning “thread” and pendulus meaning “hanging” for small tubers hanging by threadlike roots.  In the 1600’s English herbalist Nicholas Culpepper described medicinal uses as curing bladder problems, throat, lung diseases and “the falling sickness.” Also remedied bloated stomachs “dissolving and breaking the wind.”

  • Foeniculum vulgaris ‘Purpureum’ Bronze fennel Z 4-9

    Yellow blooms on umbels in late spring into summer

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Yellow blooms on umbels  in late spring into summer, features feathery, compound, aromatic purple leaves with needle-like segments.

    Size: 4-5’x2-3’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, well-drained soil
    Native: Mediterranean
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees and birds. Nectar plant for Swallowtail butterflies.

    We grow it in the butterfly garden.  Used by ancient Egyptians as a food and medicine. Considered a snake bite remedy in ancient China. During the Middle Ages  hung over doorways to drive away evil spirits.  Fennel is also associated with the origin of the marathon. Athenian Pheidippides carried a fennel stalk on his 150 mile, 2 day run to Sparta to gather soldiers for the battle of Marathon with Persia in 490 B.C. The battle itself was also reportedly waged on a field of fennel.  The Gardeners Dictionary: . . . eighth ed.  1768