Perennials & Biennials

Showing 9–12 of 430 results

  • Aconitum fischeri Fischer’s monkshood syn. A. carmichaelii

    Spikes of cobalt blue hooded blooms September – October

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Aconitum fischeri  Fischer’s monkshood  syn. A. carmichaelii   Z 2-7
    Spikes of cobalt blue hooded blooms September – October       POISON

    Size: 24-36”x 10”
    Care: part shade in moist soil
    Native: No. Japan, E. Russia, Korea, China
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant. Attracts butterflies.

    The name Aconitum is from the mythical hill Aconitus in Pontica where Hercules fought with Cerberus.  Philip Miller in The Gardener’s Dictionary (1768) wrote that the name Aconitum comes from Greek word for dart “because the Barbarians used to daub their darts therewith.” The Monkshood reputedly sprang from the jaws of Cerberus, the guard dog of the underworld.  In China called “bao ye wo tou.”  Wm. Robinson considered this one of the best monkshoods.  Collected before 1820.

  • Aconitum napellus Monkshood, Wolfsbane Z 5-8 POISON

    Midsummer, blue spikes of hooded blooms

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Aconitum napellus  Monkshood, Wolfsbane             Z 5-8    POISON
    Midsummer, blue spikes of hooded blooms.

    Size: 2-3’x 12”
    Care: part shade, cool, moist soil
    Native: Europe
    Awards: Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden Great Plant Picks

    The name Aconitum is from the mythical hill Aconitus in Pontica where Hercules fought with Cerberus.  The Monkshood reputedly sprang from the jaws of Cerberus, the guard dog of the underworld.  Believed to make a potion that helped witches fly.  Philip Miller in The Gardener’s Dictionary (1768) wrote that the name Aconitum comes from Greek word for dart “because the Barbarians used to daub their darts therewith.” Used by physicians in 1200’s and to poison wolves:  “This Wolf’s bayne of all poisons is the most hastie poison.”  Wm. Turner, 1560’s.  Introduced to the new world by John Winthrop in 1631. Miller wrote “in flower it makes a pretty appearance” so that many people grow it in their gardens.

  • Adenophora lilifolia Ladybells Z 3-8

    Fragrant, flared, downfacing bluebells

    $9.75/ea

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    Adenophora lilifolia    Ladybells   Z 3-8
    Fragrant, flared, downfacing bluebells in midsummer, July and August

    Size: 18" x 12" spreader
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: central Europe east to Siberia

    Adenophora is Greek from aden meaning “gland” and phore meaning “to bear.” Japanese cultivated this for edible root. “Fragrant blue flowers, freely borne on a loose pyramidal inflorescence.” H.H. Thomas, 1915. “Well suited for the mixed border.” William Robinson, 1899.

  • Adiantum pedatum Maidenhair fern Z.4-9

    Grown for its delicate leaflets arranged in rows. One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated 94 (2013)

    $8.25/4" tallpot

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    Grown for its delicate leaflets arranged in rows. One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated 94 (2013)

    Size: 12-24”x 12”
    Care: Shade in moist soil
    Native: all parts of No. America including Wisconsin
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Cherokee made a tea for flu, fever and rheumatism, and powdered parts for heart ailments, paralysis and asthma. Native Americans made a hair wash from the stems and applied a topical poultice of masticated fronds to a wound to arrest bleeding. 1st described by French botanist Cornu (1635). Introduced to France from Canada where it grew in “such quantities that the French send it from thence in package for other goods and the apothecaries at Paris use it for (another Adiantum) in all their compositions in which that is ordered.” Philip Miller (1768). Tradescant the Younger introduced this fern to garden cultivation when he sent it to England around 1638. English herbalist Nicholas Culpepper claimed it to be “a good remedy for coughs, asthmas, pleurisy, etc., and on account of it’s being a gentle diuretic also in jaundice, gravel and other impurities of the kidneys.” Father of the mixed perennial border, William Robinson, called this “elegant.” It “is unquestionably one of the most distinct and beautiful of the hardy ferns.” The Garden 1876.

    Adiantum is from Greek adiantos, unwettable because its fronds repel water.
    English herbalist Nicholas Culpepper claimed it to be “a good remedy for coughs, asthmas, pleurisy, etc., and on account of it’s being a gentle diuretic also in jaundice, gravel and other impurities of the kidneys.” Native Americans made a hair wash from the stems and applied a topical poultice of masticated fronds to a wound to arrest bleeding.