Perennials & Biennials

Showing 13–16 of 430 results

  • Adiantum venustum Himalayan maidenhair fern Z 5-8

    Black stems hold triangular, delicate, lacy fronds of tiny leaflets

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Adiantum venustum Himalayan maidenhair fern  Z 5-8
    Black stems hold triangular, delicate, lacy fronds of tiny leaflets.  Favorite short fern.

    Size: 6" x 12", slow spreader
    Care: part or light shade in moist well-drained soil but tolerates any soil
    Native: China and Himalayan Mountains
    Awards: Great Plant Pick from Elisabeth Cary Miller Botanic Garden & Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    Adiantum is from Greek adiantos, “unwettable” because its fronds repel water. Venustum means attractive in Latin. (We think it should be “venustumest” for most attractive.) Collected for gardens by 1841.

  • Aethionema cordifolia Lebanon stonecress, Persian candytuft Z 4-8

    Short subshrub with lovely, tiny blue-green leaves on upright stems with terminal clusters of pale pink blooms in spring. Perfect for rock gardens and front of the border.

    $6.95/3" pot

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    Aethionema cordifolia  Lebanon stonecress, Persian candytuft   Z 4-8
    Short subshrub with lovely, tiny blue-green leaves on upright stems with terminal clusters of pale pink blooms in spring. Perfect for rock gardens and front of the border.

    Size: 6-8” x 12-15”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil. Sheer back after blooming to keep compact and rebloom.
    Native: Lebanon and possibly Caucasus on chalky summits.

    Collected before 1841. Foster: “…when planted in quantity does wonders for mass effect in the rock garden or alpine lawn.” January 1876 issue of The Garden called these “very attractive dwarf rock garden plants.” Aethionema from aitho meaning scorch and nema for filament.

  • Agastache aurantiaca Navajo sunset Z 5-9

    Brilliant light orange blooms from spring-fall, silvery-grey aromatic foliage

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    Agastache aurantiaca   Navajo sunset   Z 5-9
    Brilliant light orange blooms from spring-fall, silvery-grey aromatic foliage

    Size: 12-18” x 24”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Western US
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies, hummingbirds, and birds. Deer and rabbit resistant

    Published in American Midland Naturalist 1945.

  • Agastache foeniculum, Anise hyssop

    Showy blue spikes from July to September, fragrant

    $9.75/bareroot

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    Agastache foeniculum  Anise hyssop Z 4-8
    Showy purple spikes from July to September, fragrant

    Size: 3-5' x 12"
    Care: Full sun to part shade in well-drained soil, drought tolerant & deer resistant
    Native: North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    The name Agastache is from Greek agan and stachys meaning much like an ear of wheat referring to the shape of the flower spike. Anise hyssop leaves were used by American Indians of the Missouri River region to make tea and as a sweetener in cooking. The Cheyenne used it to relieve chest pain due to coughing or to a dispirited heart. Listed hyssop as an aromatic herb in McMahon’s 1805 book.