Perennials & Biennials

Showing 49–56 of 471 results

  • Arenaria montana Sandwort, Mountain sandwort Z. 4-8

    Perky white flowers mass over a mound of evergreen foliage, May – June. “…(A) very ornamental plant …(with) fine pure white and large flowers … the white flowers appear so thickly in early summer as to obscure the foliage.” Alpine Flowers for English Gardens 1911

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Perky white flowers mass over a mound of evergreen foliage, May – June. “…(A) very ornamental plant …(with) fine pure white and large flowers … the white flowers appear so thickly in early summer as to obscure the foliage.” Alpine Flowers for English Gardens 1911.

    Size: 4-6” x 8-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil, shallow rooted so needs occasional water.
    Native: Pyrenees Mountains – France & Spain
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Collected before 1753. Arenaria from arena meaning “sand”, the condition for many of the species. Montana means “mountain.”

  • Arisaema dracontium syn. Arum dracontium   Green dragon, Dragon root  Z 4-9   POISON 

    A greenish, long-tipped spadix (the "dragon’s tongue") grows several inches beyond a narrow green spathe, a narrow, greenish, hooded, cylinder. Numerous tiny flowers crowd onto the 6-inch-long flower stem.  Tiny white flowers in spring turn into a spike of red berries in fall.

    Placeholder

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    A greenish, long-tipped spadix (the “dragon’s tongue”) grows several inches beyond a narrow green spathe, a narrow, greenish, hooded, cylinder. Numerous tiny flowers crowd onto the 6-inch-long flower stem.  Tiny white flowers in spring turn into a spike of red berries in fall.

    Size: 1-3’ x 6-8”
    Care: part-shade to shade in moist, slightly acidic soil
    Native: NH to Florida, west to TX, north to MN. Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant. Although poison to humans, birds, wild turkeys and wood thrush as well as some mammals eat the berries.

    Named by 1753. Arisaema, is Greek for “blood arum” or “red arum”. Dracontium, means “of the dragon” in Latin. Named for the resemblance of the spadix to the tongue of a dragon.  For the Menominee sacred bundles of the roots and gave the owner the power of supernatural dreams.

  • Arisaema triphyllum Jack-in-the-pulpit, Indian turnip Z 4-9

    May-June striped, hooded spathe, red berries in fall

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    May-June striped, hooded spathe, red berries in fall – a favorite shade plant

    Size: 6-24”x 12”
    Care: Part shade - shade in moist soil
    Native: Eastern No. America, Wisconsin native.

    Pawnee medicine men pulverized the corm to treat headaches and rheumatism.  The Cherokee used it to cure headaches, the common cold, ringworm, boils and “for scald head (and) scrofulous sores.”  Iroquois remedied adolescent diarrhea and listless infants with Jack-in-the-pulpit.  Also “for nonconception caused by cold blood” and for “temporary sterility.”  Chopped root mixed with whiskey cured colds.  It induced pregnancy for female horses.   Menominee pulverized the root, placed in incised lip to counteract witchery on the face.  The seed predicted death or recovery for the Meskwaki who also used it as poison to kill enemies.  The Potawatomi discovered that cooking the root for 3 days eliminated the poison.   HoChunk spread a compound of the root on neuralgia or rheumatism. Native Americans boiled the berries and roasted the root, for food. Garden cultivation since 1664.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Aristolochia durior syn. A. macrophylla, A sipho Dutchman’s pipe, Birthwort Z 4-8

    Yellow, mottled brown flowers like Meerschaum pipes in May – June, mostly grown for heart-shaped leaves on this vigorous climber (climbs by twining). Perfect for creating a screen on pergolas, arbors and fences.

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Yellow, mottled brown flowers like Meerschaum pipes in May – June, mostly grown for heart-shaped leaves on this vigorous climber (climbs by twining). Perfect for creating a screen on pergolas, arbors and fences.

    Size: 20-30’ x 2’ at ground, 20’ on top.
    Care: sun to shade (one of few vines for shade) in moist well-drained to moist soil. Prune to encourage branching.
    Native: Maine to Georgia, west to KS.
    Wildlife Value: host Pipevine swallowtail butterfly

    Aristolochia is Greek for easing childbirth. Cherokee applied decoction of root for swollen legs & feet. Collected by Colonial nurseryman John Bartram and sent to England in 1763. Sold in America’s 1st plant catalog, Bartram’s Broadside, 1783. In Colonial and Victorian gardens, popular vine to create privacy and shade

  • Armeria pseudoarmeria syn. A. formosa syn. A. latifolia, A. alpina Giant thrift Z 5-7

    Carmine-pink balls atop foliage like a clump of grass flowering in June and sporadically all summer

    $11.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Carmine-pink balls atop foliage like a clump of grass flowering in June and sporadically all summer

    Size: 12” x 8”
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil, heat and drought tolerant
    Native: So. Europe

    In gardens since 1740. Per Wm Robinson this plant: “one of the best hardy flowers from southern Europe and should be in every collection.”

  • Artemisia frigida Prairie sagewort, Silky wormwood, Z 3-10

    Erect stems bear silvery-white, finely-divided foliage. Leaves smell like camphor. Small yellow flowers bloom in summer. 

    Placeholder

    $11.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Erect stems bear silvery-white, finely-divided foliage. Leaves smell like camphor. Small yellow flowers bloom in summer. 

    Size: 6-18” x 12-18”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: all North America except the SE, CA and OR, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: deer resistant, source of nesting material for native bees, food for caterpillars of several butterflies & moths
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit
    Size: Native Americans used this Artemisia to preserve meat, feed horses, repel insects, to remedy toothache, headache, coughing, lung ailments, heartburn, and colds. Indians in Great Basin used it in ceremonies .Chippewa made a decoction of root for convulsions.

    Meriwether Lewis collected this in early September 1804  along the Missouri River in South Dakota on October 3 1804.

  • Artemisia ludoviciana Silver sage, Wormwood Z 4-9

    Grown for its silver-grey foliage

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Grown for its silver-grey foliage in the garden & dried in arrangements

    Size: 3’ x 2’ and spreading
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Colorado south to Texas, west to California.

    Blackfoot cleaned themselves with this as part of religious rituals.  California’s Shasta Indians prepared dead bodies to be buried with the leaves.  HoChunk made a smudge to revive the unconscious.  Cahuilla Indians made baskets and roofs and walls of their homes with the stems.  First collected for gardens by Thomas Nuttall in early 1800’s.  Artemisia named for the wife of Mausolus, king of Caria, who began using another Artemisia. Miller 1768.

  • Artemisia stellerana Beach wormwood, Dusty miller Z 3-7

    Intricate, embroidery-like, felty-white foliage

    $8.95/pot

    Buy

    Grown for its intricate, embroidery-like, felty-white foliage

    Can not ship to: Maryland

    Size: 24” x 12”
    Care: sun in moist well-drained to dry soil
    Native: naturalized in North America from Massachusetts to Delaware

    Artemisia named for the wife of Mausolus, king of Caria, who began using another Artemisia.  Miller 1768. Collected from the wild by 1842.  Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll to use on the edges of gardens, 1908   L.H. Bailey (1933) described it as “attractive for its whiteness.  Useful for borders.”

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.