Perennials & Biennials

Showing 177–184 of 483 results

  • Erigeron aureus Alpine yellow fleabane Z 5-8

    White hairs cover frosted-looking basil leaves making this worthy of any garden even without flowers, but then its school bus yellow daisies flower from spring through fall.

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    White hairs cover frosted-looking basil leaves making this worthy of any garden even without flowers, but then its school bus yellow daisies flower from spring through fall.

    Size: 3-4” x 3”
    Care: sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Cascade Mountains from Alberta to State of Washington
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and birds

    1st described in literature in 1884.

  • Erigeron compositus Cutleaf daisy, Dwarf mountain fleabane Z 3-8

    Cushion shaped plant with wooly grey leaves topped by small bluish, pink or white rays like a daisy with a yellow center. Flowers in June-July.

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    Cushion shaped plant with wooly grey leaves topped by small bluish, pink or white rays like a daisy with a yellow center. Flowers in June-July.

    Size: 6” x 6-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil.
    Native: all of western No. America from prairies to alpine slopes.

    Thompson Indians from British Columbia chewed on the plant then spit on sores to remedy skin ailments.  They also made a decoction of the plant, mixed with any weeds for broken bones.  Collected by Meriwether Lewis in late spring 1806 near Lewiston Idaho.  Erigeron comes from Greek er meaning “spring” and geron for “old man” due to some of these species having white downy hair like an old man.

  • Erinus alpinus Fairy foxglove, Alpine balsam Z 4-7

    May- July violet, pink or white 5-petaled stars

    $8.75/pot

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    May- July violet, pink or white 5-petaled stars (not resembling floxgloves) , self-sows. Rock garden plant.

    Size: 3” x 4” spreads
    Care: sun to part shade in well drained soil
    Native: Alps & Pyrenees
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Erinus comes from Greek er meaning “spring,” for the time when this plant blooms.  Collected by 1753.  Wm. Robinson, father of mixed perennial border, called this a “pretty alpine plant.”

  • Erodium manescavii syn. Erodium manescani Heron’s bill Z. 5-8

    Magenta saucer-shaped petals April-November. Seed’s tail like a corkscrew, flings seed as it dries.

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Magenta saucer-shaped petals April-November. Seed’s tail like a corkscrew, flings seed as it dries.

    Size: 12-18” x 8”
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Pyrenees

    Erodium is Greek meaning “heron,” because the seed capsule resembles a heron’s head and bill. Collected before 1889. According to William Robinson, father of the mixed perennial border, this is “most showy (and) throws up strong flower stalks…each with 7 to 15 purplish flowers.”

  • Eryngium giganteum Miss Wilmott’s ghost SELF-SEEDING BIENNIAL Z 5-8

    In summer, oval thistles top prickly green, turning steely blue, silvery, bracts – very ornamental.

    $12.25/bareroot

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    In summer, oval thistles top prickly green, turning steely blue, silvery, bracts – very ornamental.

    Size: 36" x 24"
    Care: Full sun in moist well-drained, fertile soil. Be sure to let it drop its seeds & do not weed seedlings out the following spring.
    Native: Caucasus Mountains
    Awards: England's Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Eryngium is Greek for thistle.  Introduced to England in 1820. Miss Ellen Willmott (1858-1934), a wealthy, eccentric English gardener reputedly dropped seeds as she passed her neighbors’ gardens. The plants came up afterwards, her “ghosts.” Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll in 1908.

  • Eryngium maritimum Sea holly Z 5-10

    Round thistles turning steely blue in July-August atop silver colored, prickly bracts. Ivy-shaped prickly foliage.

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    Round thistles turning steely blue in July-August atop silver colored, prickly bracts. Ivy-shaped prickly foliage.

    Size: 12" x 10"
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil.
    Native: Seacoasts of Europe

    “Eryngium” is Greek for thistle.  Anglo-Saxons prescribed Sea holly root to cure the king’s evil, serpent bites, broken bones, stiff necks and melancholy. Also considered an aphrodisiac and brought on “kissing comfits.”   This was identified by Dioscorides in De Materica Medica for medicinal use around 70 A.D.  Eryngium was described in Gerard’s Herball  in 1597 for its uses: ”old and aged people that are consumed and withered with age, and which want natural moisture (and also) amended the defects of nature in the younger,”  William Robinson, father of the mixed perennial border, considered this plant “very pretty.”

  • Eryngium planum Flat sea holly Z 5-9

    Round thistles top prickly steel blue, silver colored, bracts June-August. Stems turn steel blue too.  Deadhead for repeat bloom.  Reseeds readily.  Great cut flowers: dry or fresh…

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Round thistles top prickly steel blue, silver colored, bracts June-August.  Stems turn steel blue too. Deadhead for repeat bloom.  Reseeds readily.  Great cut flowers: dry or fresh.

    Size: 36” x 18”
    Care: Sun well-drained soil, drought tolerant
    Native: E. Europe

    Eryngium is Greek meaning “thistle.” Eryngium was described in Gerard’s Herball in 1597 for its uses: ”old and aged people that are consumed and withered with age, and which want natural moisture (and also) amended the defects of nature in the younger.”

  • Eryngium yuccifolium Rattlesnake master Z 3-8

    Blooms July-December, prickly round white umbels. Leaves like thinner versions of a Yucca.

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Blooms July-December, prickly round white umbels. Leaves like thinner versions of a Yucca.

    Size: 48” x 18”
    Care: Full sun, moist well-drained soil, heat and drought tolerant.
    Native: Eastern United States, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Supports over 40 bee species.
    Awards: Missouri Botanic Garden Plant of Merit.

    Eryngium is Greek meaning “thistle.”   The name “Rattlesnake master” comes from the use by Chickasaw shamans of chewing the root, blowing it on the hands and then picking up rattlers without injury or “from its virtues of curing the bite of that venomous reptile.”  Gardeners’ Dictionary, 1768.  Valued by American Indians for medicinal uses: a diuretic, stimulant, and cure for venereal disease and impotence, purify blood; Chippewa for joint inflammation and strengthen young children and Cherokee as a toothache remedy; Sioux:  Root cured bladder ailments, and rattlesnake bites and scorpion stings.  A concentration of boiled root increased virility for Sioux men. The Forest Potawatomi used Rattlesnake master as a good luck charm – the top placed in a pocket made the gambler sure to win. 1st collected in Virginia by Rev. John Banister who moved to colonial Virginia in 1678.  A gunman mistakenly shot and killed him while he collected plants.