Perennials & Biennials

Showing 177–184 of 467 results

  • Eryngium maritimum Sea holly Z 5-8

    Mounds of showy, frosted, holly-like foliage

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    Mounds of showy, frosted, holly-like foliage with conspicuous silver veins and prickly leaf margins with round, steel-blue thistles blooming in late summer.  Grow at the front of the garden or in a rock garden.

    Size: 8" x 8"
    Care: sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: Seacoasts of Europe

    Eryngium is Greek meaning “thistle.”  Anglo-Saxons prescribed the root to cure the king’s evil, serpent bites, broken bones, stiff necks and melancholy. During Tudor times the plant, reputedly an aphrodisiac, brought on “kissing comfits.” Garden cultivation in America since 1700’s.

  • Eryngium planum Flat sea holly Z 5-9

    Round thistles top prickly steely blue, silver colored, bracts

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Round thistles top prickly steely blue, silver colored, bracts June-August.  Stems turn steel blue too. Deadhead for repeat bloom.  Reseeds readily.  Great cut flowers: dry or fresh.

    Size: 36” x 18”
    Care: Sun well-drained soil, drought tolerant
    Native: E. Europe

    Eryngium is Greek meaning “thistle.” Eryngium was described in Gerard’s Herball in 1597 for its uses: ”old and aged people that are consumed and withered with age, and which want natural moisture (and also) amended the defects of nature in the younger.”

  • Eryngium yuccifolium Rattlesnake master Z 4-8

    prickly round white umbels surrounded by spiny bracts

    $11.95/bareroot

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    July-September, prickly round white umbels. Leaves like thinner versions of a Yucca

    Size: 48” x 18”
    Care: Full sun, moist well-drained soil.
    Native: Eastern United States, Wisconsin native

    Eryngium is Greek meaning “thistle.”   Chickasaw shamans chewed the root, blew on their hands and then picked up rattlers without injury, hence “Rattlesnake master.” Its roots valued by Native Americans for medicinal uses: diuretic, stimulant, and to cure venereal disease, impotence and joint inflammation. Potawatomi used Rattlesnake master for good luck in gambling.

  • Eupatorium coelestinum album syn Conoclinium coelestinum ‘Album’ Mistflower ‘Album’ Z 3-7

    Clusters of white in fall – looks like a big Ageratum - August to October.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Clusters of white in fall – looks like a big Ageratum – August to October.

    Size: 3’ x 2-3’
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Central and Southeastern US
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & butterflies - nectar source for American painted lady butterfly

    Eupatorium named after Mithridates Eupator, ancient king of Pontus, Greece, said by
    Pliny to have used another species of Eupatorium medicinally in 1st century B.C.  ‘Album’ first published in 1940.

  • Eupatorium coelestinum Blue mist

    Clusters of cornflower blue in fall - August to October.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Clusters of cornflower blue in fall – looks like a big Ageratum but it’s a perennial, not an annual – August to October. One of the best fall flowers.

    Size: 3' x 2-3'
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil. Tolerant of walnut toxicity.
    Native: New Jersey - Missouri
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees & butterflies - nectar source for American painted lady butterfly

    Eupatorium named after Mithridates Eupator, ancient king of Pontus, Greece, said by Pliny to have used another species of Eupatorium medicinally in 1st century B.C.  This species 1st collected by John Bartram in 1732 and offered for sale in Bartram Garden’s 1783 Broadside, America’s 1st plant catalog.

  • Eupatorium perfoliatum Boneset, Thoroughwort

    Frilly white cymes brighten the garden - July to September

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Frilly white cymes brighten the garden – July to September

    Size: 4’ x 2-3’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Canada to Florida & TX, WI
    Wildlife Value: Host for caterpillars of Lost meadowlark butterflies. Bronze copper, Monarch, Crescent and Fritillary butterflies feast on the flower’s nectar in fall.

    Eupatorium named after Mithridates Eupator (132-63 BC)  king of Pontus, Greece, said by Pliny to have used another species of Eupatorium medicinally in 1st century B.C. This named “boneset” because it treated breakbone fever in the 1800’s. Grown at America’s 1st botanic garden, Elgin Botanic Garden 1811.  Sent to England in 1699.

  • Eupatorium purpureum Joe Pye weed Z 3-9

    From July to September 6' tall stalks bear showy dusty rose flower heads.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    From July to September 6′ tall stalks bear showy dusty rose flower heads.

    Size: 5-6' x 3'
    Care: Sun, moist to moist well-drained soil. Resistant to Walnut toxicity. Cut back half way in early June to make this shorter and bushier.
    Native: Eastern U.S., Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts Monarch, Swallowtail & Red Admiral butterflies

    Named “Joe Pye weed” after a Native American medicine man who used the plant in New England to cure typhus, typhus being named “jopi.” Meskwaki men “nibbled (Joe Pye weed) when speaking to women when they are in the wooing mood.” This had the power of “fetching” women. Introduced to gardens in 1610.

  • Eupatorium sessilifolium Upland boneset Z 3-8

    Showy flat-topped, white flower clusters July to September, considered rare and endangered

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    $11.95/bareroot

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    Showy flat-topped, white flower clusters July to September, considered rare and endangered

    Size: 3-4’ x 12-24”
    Care: Shade to part shade in moist well-drained soil to dry soil
    Native: most of eastern half of US, Wisconsin native but rare and endangered
    Wildlife Value: Nectar attracts bees and butterflies. Food for caterpillars of several moths. Deer & rabbit resistant.

    Collected before 1753.