Perennials & Biennials

Showing 153–160 of 471 results

  • Disporum flavens Fairy bells Z 4-9

    Upright stems arch at the tops and moon-yellow bells dangle from the tips

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Upright stems arch at the tops and moon-yellow bells dangle from the tips – elegant.

    Size: 25-30” x 16-20”
    Care: shade to part shade in moist-well-drained soil
    Native: Korea

    Collected in 1926 in Manchuria and described in Botanical Magazine (Tokyo) in 1934.

  • Dodecatheon jefferyi Sierra shooting star, Tall mountain shooting star, Jeffrey’s shooting star Z 5-8 Ephemeral

    Fuschia, reflexed petals, looking like a descending shuttlecock or, as described, a shooting star, dangle from stems in late spring to early summer

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    Fuschia, reflexed petals, looking like a descending shuttlecock or, as described, a shooting star, dangle from stems in late spring to early summer

    Size: 18-24” x 14-18”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Pacific NW Alaska- CA & east in Montana and Idaho

    First collected by Meriwether Lewis on the Expedition at the Dalles of the Columbia River on April 16, 1806. Named for Scottish botanist John Jeffrey, who collected it and explored the Okanagan and Fraser regions with the Hudson Bay Co. in 1851-53.

  • Dodecatheon meadia Pink Shooting Star Z 4-8 Ephemeral

    Rosy-lilac reflexed flowers, looking like a descending shuttlecock, dangle from stems in spring

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    Rosy-lilac reflexed flowers, looking like a descending shuttlecock, dangle from stems in spring

    Size: 12-24” x 6-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil.
    Native: PA to Wisconsin, south to TX.
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit

    Name Dodecatheon from the Greek dodeka (twelve) and theos (gods), meaning 12 superior gods, after the name given to another plant by Roman author, Pliny the Elder. The species name meadia after Richard Mead, physician to George III. John Tradescant the Younger sent this to England by 1640. “A favorite among old border flowers.” William Robinson, 1899.

  • Dodecatheon meadia Shooting Star Z 4-8 Ephemeral

    White reflexed flowers

    $8.95/pot

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    Available to order in Spring only

    White reflexed flowers, looking like a descending schuttlecock, dangle from stems on this spring ephemeral.

    Size: 12-24” x 6-1'
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained soil.
    Native: PA to Wisconsin, south to TX.
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Name Dodecatheon from the Greek dodeka (twelve) and theos (gods), meaning 12 superior gods, after the name given to another plant by Roman author, Pliny the Elder. The species name meadia after Richard Mead, physician to George III. Transported from its native America by John Tradescant the Younger to England by 1640. “A favorite among old border flowers.” William Robinson, 1899.

  • Draba aizoides Yellow Whitlow grass Z 3-8

    Small bun-shaped tuft of evergreen foliage bearing upright clusters of bright yellow flowers in early to mid-spring.

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    Small bun-shaped tuft of evergreen foliage bearing upright clusters of bright yellow flowers in early to mid-spring.

    Size: 2-4” x 6-8”
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil.
    Native: Europe

    Before 1767, Linnaeus

  • Dracocephalum botryoides Dragonhead Z 4-7

    Fuzzy, grey, pinnatified foliage with baby pink blossoms

    $8.95/pot

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    Fuzzy, grey, pinnatified foliage with baby pink blossoms in May-June

    Size: 5” x 18”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Caucasus on rocky, stony slopes, and screes. Where it is now endangered.

    1st described in 1812.

  • Dracocephalum grandiflorum Bigflower dragonhead Z 3-8

    Intense blue hood-shaped flowers in summer

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    Intense blue hood-shaped flowers in summer

    Size: 6”x 8”
    Care: full sun in moist, well-drained soil
    Native: Siberia

    Dracocephalum is Greek meaning “dragonhead” referring to the shape of the flower. Introduced to gardens by 1759.   Grown in American gardens since 1850’s. William Robinson, father of the mixed perennial border, described this as “very dwarf” having “large clusters of intensely blue flowers.” Sanders considered it an “excellent plant for a sunny rockery.” 1913.

  • Dryopteris filix-mas ‘Parsley’ Male fern Z 4-8

    Spring fiddleheads are followed by crinkled ferny leaves resembling parsley on arching stems on this small fern.

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    Spring fiddleheads are followed by crinkled ferny leaves resembling parsley on arching stems on this small fern.

    Size: 2’ x 2’
    Care: shade to part sun in moist well-drained soil, tolerates clay
    Native: Europe and North America
    Wildlife Value: provides shelter and habitat for birds and bees, Deer & rabbit Resistant

    Dryopteris filix-mas collected before 1834, Victorian cultivar.