Perennials & Biennials

Showing 145–152 of 557 results

  • Coreopsis rosea Pink tickseed Z 4-8

    pink daisies with yellow centers from summer through autumn

    $8.75/pot

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    Dainty (appearing but actually tough) pink daisies with yellow centers from summer through autumn, very long blooming. Wonderful for rock gardens,  groundcover or front of border.

    Size: 10” x 12”
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained soil. Slow to emerge in spring so don't forget where it is.
    Native: Eastern No. America
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies

    Coreopsis is Greek meaning “buglike” referring to the seeds looking like little black bugs.  Thomas Nuttall 1st collected this flower in 1815 about 20 miles NW of Savannah along the river.  He described its native habitat: “in open grassy swamps from New Jersey to Georgia…” William Robinson, father of the mixed perennial border called this “a neat and pretty plant.”  In 1913 Sanders wrote that it “make(s) a brilliant display of color (when) grown in masses in sunny borders.”

  • Coreopsis verticillata Thread leafed tickseed Z 4-9

    All summer into fall, non-stop - yolk yellow daisies

    $8.75/bareroot

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    All summer into fall, free-blooming non-stop – yolk yellow daisies atop wirey stems.

    Size: 24" x 18" spreading
    Care: Sun to part shade well-drained soil, drought tolerant
    Native: S.E. U.S.
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Exported from its native America to England in 1759. Used to dye cloth red.

  • Cornus canadensis Bunchberry, Creeping dogwood Z 2-7

    white, pointed bracts in spring and showy scarlet berries

    $8.75/POT

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    Four white, pointed bracts in spring and showy scarlet berries in fall

    Size: 6” x Indefinite but slow growing
    Care: part shade in moist, acidic soil. Needs moisture to establish
    Native: Northern areas from the east to the west coasts of No. America, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: Host for the caterpillar of the Spring azure butterfly.

    Abnaki Indians used this to cure side pains.  Algonquin made a cathartic tea, cured colds and stomach aches and Delaware reduced body pains. Chippewa, Cree and Eskimo smoked the berries. Probably 1st collected for gardens by John Bartram.  Offered for sale in Bartram Garden’s 1783 Broadside, America’s 1st plant catalog.   “One of the prettiest plants for the bog garden or the cool parts of the rock garden.”  William Robinson, 1899. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Cortusa matthiola Alpine bells Z 4-9

    Demure purple, drooping bells atop a short scape arising from a low carpet of foliage in May-June.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Demure purple, drooping bells atop a short scape arising from a low carpet of foliage in May-June.

    Size: 9” x 10”
    Care: shade to part shade in moist soil
    Native: Alps

    Discovered in a valley near Vincenza Italy in the foothills of the eastern Alps by Padua botany professor J.A. Cortusus. His friend Mattioli (1500-1577) named it for him and the species was named for Mattioli.  According to Mattioli women used the leaves to color their cheeks pink: “the leaves applied to the cheeks, and shortly removed, occasion a beautiful colour, resembling that from the finest rouge. . .” Gerard grew this in London in the 1590’s but it was “at all times rare.”    Profiled in 1807 in Curtis’ Botanical Magazine, plate 987

  • Corydalis lutea syn. Pseudofumaria lutea Z 4-8

    Yellow blooms from late spring - fall

    $8.75/pot

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    Yellow trumpet-like clusters from late spring – fall. One of the few shade perennials that blooms non-stop.

    Size: 9-15" x 18"
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Throughout Europe

    Corydalis is Greek for “lark” korydalos, referring to the shape of flower, a lark’s spur. Lutea means “yellow.” According to 16th century herbalist Culpepper, “Saturn owns the herb” so Corydalis lutea cured Saturn’s diseases of the liver, spleen, leprosy, scabs, itches, cholera, salty blood, jaundice, melancholy, plague, pestilence and red eyes.  The Greek Dioscordes claimed that it “hinders fresh springing of hairs on the eye lids.” Since 1800’s in U.S.

  • Corydalis ochroleuca syn. Pseudofumaria alba Z 4-8

    Creamy white flowers touched with yellow

    $8.75/pot

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    Creamy white flowers touched with yellow from May to October.  One of longest blooming flowers for shade.

    Size: 6-12” x 12”
    Care: Full sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Balkans

    Corydalis is Greek for “lark” korydalos, referring to the shape of flower resembling a lark’s spur. Garden designer Gertrude Jekyll (1848-1931) planted Corydalis ochroleuca as a “wide carpet” under peonies in her spring garden at her home, Munstead Wood.

  • Corydalis sempervirens syn. Capnoides sempervirens Rock harlequin, Fumitory Z 5-7

    Pink and yellow bicolor from spring to summer

    $9.25/bareroot

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    RESEEDING SHORT-LIVED PERENNIAL

    Pink and yellow bicolor from spring to summer

    Size: 10-12” x 10-12”
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist well drained soil
    Native: from Nova Scotia west to Alaska, south to North Carolina

    Corydalis is Greek for “lark” korydalos, referring to the shape of flower resembling a lark’s spur.    Cultivated in American gardens before 1900. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Crambe cordifolia Colewort Z. 5-9

    Giant profusion of white flowers from late May to June

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Giant profusion of white flowers from late May to June

    Size: 7-8’ x 5’
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Caucasus

    First collected before 1863.  This is a stately and noble plant, with large heart shaped leaves.  The loose flower-heads, which are often 6 feet in height, and nearly as much through, are composed of myriads of small white flowers, which at a distance may be likened to a giant specimen of Gypsophila; it blooms during June and July.”  H.H. Thomas 1915.