Perennials & Biennials

Showing 145–152 of 548 results

  • Corydalis lutea syn. Pseudofumaria lutea Z 4-8

    Yellow blooms from late spring - fall

    $8.25/pot

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    Yellow trumpet-like clusters from late spring – fall. One of the few shade perennials that blooms non-stop.

    Size: 9-15" x 18"
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Throughout Europe

    Corydalis is Greek for “lark” korydalos, referring to the shape of flower, a lark’s spur. Lutea means “yellow.” According to 16th century herbalist Culpepper, “Saturn owns the herb” so Corydalis lutea cured Saturn’s diseases of the liver, spleen, leprosy, scabs, itches, cholera, salty blood, jaundice, melancholy, plague, pestilence and red eyes.  The Greek Dioscordes claimed that it “hinders fresh springing of hairs on the eye lids.” Since 1800’s in U.S.

  • Corydalis ochroleuca syn. Pseudofumaria alba Z 4-8

    Creamy white flowers touched with yellow

    $8.25/pot

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    Creamy white flowers touched with yellow from May to October.  One of longest blooming flowers for shade.

    Size: 6-12” x 12”
    Care: Full sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Balkans

    Corydalis is Greek for “lark” korydalos, referring to the shape of flower resembling a lark’s spur. Garden designer Gertrude Jekyll (1848-1931) planted Corydalis ochroleuca as a “wide carpet” under peonies in her spring garden at her home, Munstead Wood.

  • Corydalis sempervirens syn. Capnoides sempervirens Rock harlequin, Fumitory Z 5-7

    Pink and yellow bicolor from spring to summer

    $8.25/bareroot

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    RESEEDING SHORT-LIVED PERENNIAL

    Pink and yellow bicolor from spring to summer

    Size: 10-12” x 10-12”
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist well drained soil
    Native: from Nova Scotia west to Alaska, south to North Carolina

    Corydalis is Greek for “lark” korydalos, referring to the shape of flower resembling a lark’s spur.    Cultivated in American gardens before 1900. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Crambe cordifolia Colewort Z. 5-9

    Giant profusion of white flowers from late May to June

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Giant profusion of white flowers from late May to June

    Size: 7-8’ x 5’
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Caucasus

    First collected before 1863.  This is a stately and noble plant, with large heart shaped leaves.  The loose flower-heads, which are often 6 feet in height, and nearly as much through, are composed of myriads of small white flowers, which at a distance may be likened to a giant specimen of Gypsophila; it blooms during June and July.”  H.H. Thomas 1915.

  • Crambe maritima Sea kale Z. 5-9

    Very sweetly fragrant, honey-scented, chalky white flowers cover the plant in late May and early June. Ornamental, bluish crinkled foliage all season.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Very sweetly fragrant, honey-scented, chalky white flowers cover the plant in late May and early June. Ornamental, bluish crinkled foliage all season.

    Size: 18” x 12”
    Care: Moist well-drained soil in full sun
    Native: Western Europe to Asia Minor
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit and Great Plant Pick Award from Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden.

    Crambe means cabbage in Greek. “The glaucous leaves of the Sea kale afford a striking contrast to the bronzy foliage of surrounding subjects…I have eaten them several times and thought them delicious.” The Garden March 1876. “By the turn of the 19th century, sea kale was a very popular vegetable; its blanched shoots, which have a sweet, nutty cabbage flavor, were readily found in the finest markets and restaurants,” The American Gardener, March/April 2009. Grown by Jefferson. Recommended as an ornamental flower by Gertrude Jekyll in 1908 for its glaucous foliage.

  • Cryptotaenia japonica ‘Atropurpurea’ Purple-leaved Japanese Wild Parsley, Japanese honeywort Z 4-7

    Flowers light pink small umbels in mid-summer but forget the flowers and grow this for its showy purple bronze stems and leaves, branched stems with deeply divided, compound leaves and slightly ruffled

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Flowers light pink small umbels in mid-summer but forget the flowers and grow this for its showy purple bronze stems and leaves, branched stems with deeply divided, compound leaves and slightly ruffled edges

    Size: 18-24" x 8" and self-seeds to make clumps
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: eastern Asia

    1st described in Journal of Japanese Botany in 1926. Asians use Honeywort as a seasoning, a strengthening tonic and eat its sprouts in salads but toxic if eaten in large quantities.
    CAUTION: may cause dermatitis with repeated contact in some people; toxic if eaten in large quantities.

  • Dahlia ‘Bishop of Llandaff’ Tender perennial

    Fiery red, sem-double flowers atop reliably purple foliage from July until frost,

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Fiery red, sem-double flowers atop reliably purple foliage from July until frost

    Size: 2-3’ x 12”
    Care: moist well drained soil in full sun – lift bulb in fall, overwinter in basement
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit – 1928.

    Dahlias originally grown as food by Aztecs. 1st collected for the West by Spaniards in Mexico in 1615. The genus named after Dr. Anders Dahl, a student of Linnaeus and later a Swedish botanist in his own right. This cultivar came from a batch of chance seedlings in the nursery of breeder Fred Treseder in Wales UK. Treseder offered this and a few others to Bishop Joshua Hughes of Llandaff in 1924.

  • Dalea aurea syn Parosela aurea Golden prairie clover Z 5-9

    Cone-shaped fuzzy yellow flower spikes rise above sparse foliage in April-June

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    Cone-shaped fuzzy yellow flower spikes rise above sparse foliage in April-June

    Size: 1-3’ x 1’
    Care: sun in dry soil
    Native: West US from TX to WY
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies
    Size: Native Americans used Golden Prairie-clover to treat diarrhea and colic

    Collected and described by Thomas Nuttall, 1813.