Perennials & Biennials

Showing 121–128 of 471 results

  • Corydalis lutea syn. Pseudofumaria lutea Z 4-8

    Yellow blooms from late spring - fall

    $8.75/pot

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    Yellow trumpet-like clusters from late spring – fall. One of the few shade perennials that blooms non-stop.

    Size: 9-15" x 18"
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Throughout Europe

    Corydalis is Greek for “lark” korydalos, referring to the shape of flower, a lark’s spur. Lutea means “yellow.” According to 16th century herbalist Culpepper, “Saturn owns the herb” so Corydalis lutea cured Saturn’s diseases of the liver, spleen, leprosy, scabs, itches, cholera, salty blood, jaundice, melancholy, plague, pestilence and red eyes.  The Greek Dioscordes claimed that it “hinders fresh springing of hairs on the eye lids.” Since 1800’s in U.S.

  • Corydalis ochroleuca syn. Pseudofumaria alba Z 4-8

    Creamy white flowers touched with yellow

    $8.75/pot

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    Creamy white flowers touched with yellow from May to October.  One of longest blooming flowers for shade.

    Size: 6-12” x 12”
    Care: Full sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Balkans

    Corydalis is Greek for “lark” korydalos, referring to the shape of flower resembling a lark’s spur. Garden designer Gertrude Jekyll (1848-1931) planted Corydalis ochroleuca as a “wide carpet” under peonies in her spring garden at her home, Munstead Wood.

  • Corydalis sempervirens syn. Capnoides sempervirens Rock harlequin, Fumitory Z 5-7

    Pink and yellow bicolor from spring to summer

    $5.95/bareroot

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    RESEEDING SHORT-LIVED PERENNIAL

    Pink and yellow bicolor from spring to summer

    Size: 10-12” x 10-12”
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist well drained soil
    Native: from Nova Scotia west to Alaska, south to North Carolina

    Corydalis is Greek for “lark” korydalos, referring to the shape of flower resembling a lark’s spur.    Cultivated in American gardens before 1900. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Crambe cordifolia Colewort Z. 5-9

    Giant profusion of white flowers from late May to June

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    Giant profusion of white flowers from late May to June

    Size: 7-8’ x 5’
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Caucasus

    First collected before 1863.  This is a stately and noble plant, with large heart shaped leaves.  The loose flower-heads, which are often 6 feet in height, and nearly as much through, are composed of myriads of small white flowers, which at a distance may be likened to a giant specimen of Gypsophila; it blooms during June and July.”  H.H. Thomas 1915.

  • Crambe maritima Sea kale Z. 5-9

    Very sweetly fragrant, honey-scented, chalky white flowers cover the plant in late May and early June. Ornamental, bluish crinkled foliage all season.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Very sweetly fragrant, honey-scented, chalky white flowers cover the plant in late May and early June. Ornamental, bluish crinkled foliage all season.

    Size: 18” x 12”
    Care: Moist well-drained soil in full sun
    Native: Western Europe to Asia Minor
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit and Great Plant Pick Award from Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden.

    Crambe means cabbage in Greek. “The glaucous leaves of the Sea kale afford a striking contrast to the bronzy foliage of surrounding subjects…I have eaten them several times and thought them delicious.” The Garden March 1876. “By the turn of the 19th century, sea kale was a very popular vegetable; its blanched shoots, which have a sweet, nutty cabbage flavor, were readily found in the finest markets and restaurants,” The American Gardener, March/April 2009. Grown by Jefferson. Recommended as an ornamental flower by Gertrude Jekyll in 1908 for its glaucous foliage.

  • Dalea aurea syn Parosela aurea Golden prairie clover Z 5-9

    Cone-shaped fuzzy yellow flower spikes rise above sparse foliage in April-June

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    Cone-shaped fuzzy yellow flower spikes rise above sparse foliage in April-June

    Size: 1-3’ x 1’
    Care: sun in dry soil
    Native: West US from TX to WY
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies
    Size: Native Americans used Golden Prairie-clover to treat diarrhea and colic

    Collected and described by Thomas Nuttall, 1813.

     

  • Dalea purpurea syn. Petalostemon purpurea Violet prairie clover

    Vase shaped clump with wands of violet to purple encircling tall coneheads

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Vase shaped clump with wands of violet to purple encircling tall coneheads.

    Size: 2’ x 18”
    Care: full sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Canada to Texas, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Host for caterpillars of Dogface Sulphur, Striped blue & Mexican blue butterflies.

    Dalea named to honor English botanist Dr. Samuel Dale (1659- 1739.)  Chippewa, Meskwaki and Navajo used medicinally – as remedies for heart ailments, pneumonia, diarrhea and measles.  Comanche and Lakota chewed the root like gum, for its sweet taste.  Pawnee made brooms from the flexible stems.  1st collected by Frenchman André Michaux (1746-1802) who spent 11 years in America collecting hundreds of new plants.  Bailey described the flowers: “a constant succession of showy spikes of flowers…”(1933)

  • Darmera peltatum syn. Peltiphyllum peltatum Umbrella plant, Indian rhubarb Z 5-8

    Round with ruffled edged foliage dramatic green in summer but magnificent turning red in fall or pink umbellifer flowers in spring

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Grow for its gigantic, round, with ruffled edged, foliage, green in summer but magnificent red in fall. Pink umbellifer flowers in spring

    Size: 3-4’ x 3’
    Care: shade to sun in wet soil
    Native: Oregon & California
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    Collected before 1849.  Karok ate young shoots and Miwok mixed crushed root with acorn meal.