Perennials & Biennials

Showing 61–64 of 495 results

  • Arctostaphylos uva-ursi Bearberry, Bear’s grape, Kinnikinnick Z 2-6

    Dwarf ornamental shrub

    $10.95/bareroot

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    “Dwarf ornamental shrub, ornamental in foliage, flowers and berry.”  Rand 1866.    In spring fragrant, pinkish-white bell-shaped flowers, evergreen, glossy foliage and Marlboro red berries in fall.   Great for cascading over edge of wall or groundcover.

    Size: 4” x 20” forms dense groundcover over time. Stems root to spread.
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to dry, acidic soil. Needs watering until established. Best grown with protection from wind.
    Native: No. America, Wisconsin native
    Awards: Cary Award Distinctive Plants for New England Kinnikinnick is Algonquin meaning “mixture.” Used as an ingredient in Native American smoke mixtures. For centuries leaves used to make medicinal tea as a tonic and diuretic in many parts of the world. Cheyenne drank the tea to cure back sprains. Some Native Americans used it to cure venereal disease, others to cure pimples and itching, peeling skin. Both Indians and colonists mixed leaves with tobacco for smoking. Collected by Meriwether Lewis on the Expedition.

  • Arenaria montana Sandwort, Mountain sandwort Z. 4-8

    Perky white flowers mass over a mound of evergreen foliage, May – June. “…(A) very ornamental plant …(with) fine pure white and large flowers … the white flowers appear so thickly in early summer as to obscure the foliage.” Alpine Flowers for English Gardens 1911

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    Arenaria montana  Sandwort, Mountain sandwort Z. 4-8
    Perky white flowers mass over a mound of evergreen foliage, May – June. “…(A) very ornamental plant …(with) fine pure white and large flowers … the white flowers appear so thickly in early summer as to obscure the foliage.” Alpine Flowers for English Gardens 1911.

    Size: 4-6” x 8-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil, shallow rooted so needs occasional water.
    Native: Pyrenees Mountains – France & Spain
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Collected before 1753. Arenaria from arena meaning “sand”, the condition for many of the species. Montana means “mountain.”

  • Arisaema triphyllum Jack-in-the-pulpit, Indian turnip Z 4-9

    May-June striped, hooded spathe, red berries in fall

    $7.95/bareroot

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    Arisaema triphyllum syn. Arisaema atrorubens  Jack-in-the-pulpit, Indian turnip    Z 4-9
    May-June striped, hooded spathe, red berries in fall – a favorite shade plant

    Size: 6-24”x 12”
    Care: Part shade - shade in moist soil
    Native: Eastern No. America, Wisconsin native.

    Pawnee medicine men pulverized the corm to treat headaches and rheumatism.  The Cherokee used it to cure headaches, the common cold, ringworm, boils and “for scald head (and) scrofulous sores.”  Iroquois remedied adolescent diarrhea and listless infants with Jack-in-the-pulpit.  Also “for nonconception caused by cold blood” and for “temporary sterility.”  Chopped root mixed with whiskey cured colds.  It induced pregnancy for female horses.   Menominee pulverized the root, placed in incised lip to counteract witchery on the face.  The seed predicted death or recovery for the Meskwaki who also used it as poison to kill enemies.  The Potawatomi discovered that cooking the root for 3 days eliminated the poison.   HoChunk spread a compound of the root on neuralgia or rheumatism. Native Americans boiled the berries and roasted the root, for food. Garden cultivation since 1664.

    This item may not be available for shipping. Please email bettya@heritageflowerfarm.com to check availability for purchase.

  • Aristolochia durior syn. A. macrophylla, A sipho Dutchman’s pipe, Birthwort Z 4-8

    Yellow, mottled brown flowers like Meerschaum pipes in May – June, mostly grown for heart-shaped leaves on this vigorous climber (climbs by twining). Perfect for creating a screen on pergolas, arbors and fences.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Aristolochia durior syn. A. macrophylla, A sipho   Dutchman’s pipe, Birthwort Z 4-8
    Yellow, mottled brown flowers like Meerschaum pipes in May – June, mostly grown for heart-shaped leaves on this vigorous climber (climbs by twining). Perfect for creating a screen on pergolas, arbors and fences.

    Size: 20-30’ x 2’ at ground, 20’ on top.
    Care: sun to shade (one of few vines for shade) in moist well-drained to moist soil. Prune to encourage branching.
    Native: Maine to Georgia, west to KS.
    Wildlife Value: host Pipevine swallowtail butterfly

    Aristolochia is Greek for easing childbirth. Cherokee applied decoction of root for swollen legs & feet. Collected by Colonial nurseryman John Bartram and sent to England in 1763. Sold in America’s 1st plant catalog, Bartram’s Broadside, 1783. In Colonial and Victorian gardens, popular vine to create privacy and shade