Perennials & Biennials

Showing 65–68 of 495 results

  • Armeria pseudoarmeria syn. A. formosa syn. A. latifolia, A. alpina Giant thrift Z 5-7

    Carmine-pink balls atop foliage like a clump of grass flowering in June and sporadically all summer

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    Armeria pseudoarmeria syn. A. formosa syn. A. latifolia, A alpina Giant thrift    Z 5-7 
    Carmine-pink balls atop foliage like a clump of grass flowering in June and sporadically all summer

    Size: 12” x 8”
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil, heat and drought tolerant
    Native: So. Europe

    In gardens since 1740. Per Wm Robinson this plant: “one of the best hardy flowers from southern Europe and should be in every collection.”

  • Artemisia ludoviciana Silver sage, Wormwood Z 4-9

    Grown for its silver-grey foliage

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Artemisia ludoviciana Silver sage, Wormwood    Z 4-9
    Grown for its silver-grey foliage in the garden & dried in arrangements

    Size: 3’ x 2’ and spreading
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Colorado south to Texas, west to California.

    Blackfoot cleaned themselves with this as part of religious rituals.  California’s Shasta Indians prepared dead bodies to be buried with the leaves.  HoChunk made a smudge to revive the unconscious.  Cahuilla Indians made baskets and roofs and walls of their homes with the stems.  First collected for gardens by Thomas Nuttall in early 1800’s.  Artemisia named for the wife of Mausolus, king of Caria, who began using another Artemisia. Miller 1768.  P DR  9.45 bareroot

  • Artemisia stellerana Beach wormwood, Dusty miller Z 3-7

    Intricate, embroidery-like, felty-white foliage

    $8.95/4" pot

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    Artemisia stellerana     Beach wormwood, Dusty miller   Z 3-7
    Grown for its intricate, embroidery-like, felty-white foliage

    Size: 24” x 12”
    Care: sun in moist well-drained to dry soil
    Native: naturalized in North America from Massachusetts to Delaware

    Artemisia named for the wife of Mausolus, king of Caria, who began using another Artemisia.  Miller 1768. Collected from the wild by 1842.  Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll to use on the edges of gardens, 1908   L.H. Bailey (1933) described it as “attractive for its whiteness.  Useful for borders.”

    This item may not be available for shipping. Please email bettya@heritageflowerfarm.com to check availability for purchase.

  • Arum italicum Cuckoo plant, Lords and ladies Z 5-9

    Unusual greenish white jack-in-the-pulpit type flowers, called spath, followed by showy spikes of tomato red berries in the fall. Foliage showy too – green with network of white veins. “The leaves of this sort rise a foot and a half high, are very large, running out to a point; these are finely veined with white, interspersed with black spots, which, together with the fine shining green of their surface, make a pretty variety. The flowers grow near a foot high, and have long upright spaths, which are of a pale green, inclining to white; these appear the end of April, or beginning of May, and the seeds are ripe in August.” Phillip Miller’s Gardeners Dictionary, 1768.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Arum italicum Cuckoo plant, Lords and ladies   Z 5-9
    Unusual greenish white jack-in-the-pulpit type flowers, called spath, followed by showy spikes of tomato red berries in the fall. Foliage showy too – green with network of white veins.
    “The leaves of this sort rise a foot and a half high, are very large, running out to a point; these are finely veined with white, interspersed with black spots, which, together with the fine shining green of their surface, make a pretty variety. The flowers grow near a foot high, and have long upright spaths, which are of a pale green, inclining to white; these appear the end of April, or beginning of May, and the seeds are ripe in August.” Phillip Miller’s Gardeners Dictionary, 1768.

    Size: 10-15”x 6"
    Care: Shade to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Italy, Spain and Portugal.
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    This was identified by Dioscordies in De Materica Medica for medicinal use around 70 A.D.  “Showy,” according to William Robinson (1933.)