Perennials & Biennials

Showing 257–264 of 471 results

  • Liatris spicata Blazing star, Gayfeather Z 4-9

    Showy rosy purple spikes in July & August

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    Showy rosy purple spikes in July & August. Great cut flowers.

    Size: 3-4' x 18"
    Care: sun in moist well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: Eastern and southern U. S., Wisconsin native

    Native Americans used the roots medicinally. The Dakota recognized this as an indication “when the flower is blue-red that corn is good to eat.” The dried root reputedly repelled moths. First collected by English naturalist Mark Catesby around 1732.

  • Ligularia dentata In China called chi ye tuo wu, Leopard plant, Summer ragwort Z 3-8

    flowers are orange-yellow daisies, leaves are large, leathery, round with jagged leaf margins

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Its leaves are as ornamental as its blooms –  leaves are large, leathery, round with jagged leaf margins and prominent veins; flowers are orange-yellow daisies, bloom in mid-summer

    Size: 3-4’ x 2-3’
    Care: shade to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: China & Honsu in Japan

    Dentata refers to the jagged leaf edges. Collected and introduced to Europe by Carl Peter von Thunberg (1743-1828), student of Linnaeus at Uppsala University in Sweden. He made three trips to the Cape of Good Hope 1772-1775 where he collected about 1000 new species, Java and Ceylon (Sri Lanka) 1777 and 15 months in Japan (1775-1777) where he befriended local doctors who gave him hundreds of plants new to Western horticulture.  He succeeded Linnaeus as professor of medicine and botany at Uppsala.  Knighted by Swedish King Gustav.

  • Ligularia przewalskii Z 4-8

    Bold, deeply palmate lobed foliage, deep yellow spike

    $12.95/bareroot

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    Bold, deeply palmate lobed foliage, deep yellow spike in late summer

    Size: 5-6' x 24-36"
    Care: full to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant
    Native: Northern China

    Named for Nikolai Przewalski (1839-1888), Polish geographer and naturalist who explored Central Asia on behalf of Russia.  An old Chinese species.

  • Lilium auratum Goldband lily Z 5-8

    Blooms in late summer, fragrant recurved white trumpets with gold bands and red spots  

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Blooms in late summer, fragrant recurved white trumpets with gold bands and red spots

    Size: 2-5’ x 12
    Care: Sun with light afternoon shade in well-drained soil, slightly acidic. Mulch in winter.
    Native: Island of Honshu, Japan

    Lilium was named for the Greek word for smooth, polished referring to its leaves. The lily is referred to repeatedly in early literature from the Bible to Shakespeare. The Japanese cultivated L. auratum as a vegetable crop: “I have eaten them pretty often, and rather relished them, as they are, when cooked, sweet, mucilaginous, and without any decided taste to make them objectionable to a newcomer.” American Gardener, May 1882. The Chinese cultivated it since 1688. English nurseryman John Gould Veitch sent the Goldband lily from Japan to Europe in 1861. In late 1870’s Charles Maries, collecting in Asia for Veitch Nursery found the variety platyphyllum. Considered “queen of the lilies” in late Victorian gardens. In 1896 the Wisconsin Horticultural Society described as the “most beautiful of all Japan lilies…”

  • Lilium canadense, Z 2-6

    Showy, drooping bell-shaped flowers from lemon to dark orange in color with conspicuous red spots on the inside

    $8.95/bareroot

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Showy, drooping bell-shaped flowers from lemon to dark orange in color with conspicuous red spots on the inside

    Size: 3-8' X 2-3'
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained, slightly acidic soil
    Native: Upper Great Lakes & southern Canada
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies and hummingbirds

    Introduced to gardens from its native North America by Jacques Cartier, 1535. Also collected by Pehr Kalm who sent it to Linnaeus. Listed in the 1873 catalog of Leichtlin’schen Gartens in Baden-Baden.

  • Lilium lancifolium Tiger lily Z 3-7

    Late summer, orange, recurved blossoms with black spots

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Late summer,  nodding orange, recurved blossoms with black spots.  Fun fact – its “seeds” are small bulbils that grow where each leaf meets the stem.  The bulbils drop and in 2 years create a new plant.

    Can not ship to: Delaware and Maryland.

    Size: 2-5' x 12"
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Asia

    Referred to in Chinese literature as long ago as the 10th century, growing it in rows as a vegetable and claimed it brought the painted dragon to life. William Kerr sent the Tiger lily from Canton China to Kew in England in 1804. A Tiger lily in Wonderland’s looking glass garden told Alice “We can talk…when there is anybody worth talking to.”

  • Lilium leichtlinii Leichtlin’s Lily, Citronella Lily Z 5-9

    Up-curved petals on down-facing, yellow flowers with reddish-purple spots blooming in June-July.

    $8.95/bareroot

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    Up-curved petals on down-facing, yellow flowers with reddish-purple spots blooming in June-July

    Size: 3-4’ x 10”
    Care: sun to part shade in humus-rich, moist well-drained soil
    Native: central Honshu Japan among tall grasses in moist meadows

    Described first in Bot. Mag. 93: t. 5673 1867.

  • Lilium martagon Martagon lily Z 3-10

    pink-purple lilies with down-facing, reflexed petals

    $8.95/bareroot

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    Stalk of dozens of pink-purple, white or red lilies with down-facing, reflexed petals in early summer.

    Size: 3-4’ x 9-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil. Bulbs resent disturbance and may not flower the 1st year after planting.
    Native: from eastern France west to Asia
    Wildlife Value: Swallowtail and Tiger butterflies love the flowers

    Listed in Turner’s book as growing in England (1548). Grown in the Eichstätt Garden, the garden of Johann Konrad von Gemmingen, prince bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria, c. 1600. Lilium was named for the Greek word for smooth, polished referring to its leaves. Received Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.