Plants for Hummingbirds

Showing 49–56 of 81 results

  • Lupinus perennis Sun-dial lupin, Old maid’s bonnet, wild pea Z. 4-9

    Many flowered blue, pea flowered raceme May-June

    $8.95/BAREROOT

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    Many flowered blue, pea flowered raceme May-June

    Size: 1-2' x 12"
    Care: full sun in well drained soil. A legume, so it enriches the soil by adding nitrogen.
    Native: Maine to FL, Ontario to MN to Louisiana.
    Wildlife Value: Attracts both hummingbirds and butterflies. The only food for larvae of endangered species, Karner Blue butterfly.

    Lupinus is Latin from Lupus meaning “wolf.”  Likely sent from its native Virginia to England by Tradescant the Younger in 1637. Certainly collected by Michaux, late 1700’s.  Grown by Jefferson.  The Cherokee used this to stop bleeding.  The Menominee fattened their horses with this Lupin and made them spirited.  They rubbed the plant on themselves to give power to control the horses.

  • Monarda bradburyana Eastern beebalm, Bradbury’s Monarda Z. 5-8

    Whorls of pale pink hood-shaped petals with dark purple spots, April to June.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Whorls of pale pink hood-shaped petals with dark purple spots, April to June.

    Size: 18-24" x 24"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Walnut toxicity resistant.
    Native: IL west to KS, south from AL to TX
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies and hummingbirds

    Named for its collector, Englishman Bradbury who searched for plants in central No. America in 1810.  In gardens by 1826.

  • Monarda didyma ‘Cambridge Scarlet’ Beebalm, Oswego tea

    Whorls of scarlet tubes and bracts

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Whorls of scarlet tubes and bracts crown 3′ tall, square stems in July and August.

    Size: 3-4' x spreading
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Grow in an open location to prevent powdery mildew. Deer resistant. Walnut toxicity resistant.
    Native: Upstate NY
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies and hummingbirds

    Didyma refers to paired stamens. Oswego Indians taught colonists how to make tea from the dried leaves. Colonists in turn showed John Bartram who sent Beebalm to Peter Collinson in England, in whose garden it grew in 1744. Widely used during the American Revolution as a substitute for tea. Gertrude Jeykll recommended the cultivated variety ‘Cambridge Scarlet’ in 1908.

  • Nicotiana langsdorffii Langsdorff’s tobacco Z 10-11, grow as annual in colder areas

    Pendulous Granny Smith apple colored, tube-shaped flowers in summer through fall.

    $5.45/pot

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    Pendulous Granny Smith apple colored, tube-shaped flowers, summer through fall.

    Size: 2-3’ x 6”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Chile and Brazil
    Wildlife Value: attract hummingbirds
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Nicotiana langsdorfii introduced in 1819.  The genus name nicotiana named after John Nicot who introduced smoking tobacco to Europe. Langsdorfii named to honor  Russian naturalist Georg Heinrich von Langsdorff, Baron de Langsdorff ( 1774 -1852), Russian consul general in Brazil and leader of Langsdorff Expedition of Brazil, 1826-1829.

  • Paeonia lactiflora Buckeye Belle Z 3-8

    Semi-double, velvety blossoms of the deepest red, almost chocolate, with large outer petals surrounding narrow inner petals sprinkled with sparkling golden staminodes.  

    $20.95/bareroot

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    Semi-double, velvety blossoms of the deepest red, almost chocolate, with large outer petals surrounding narrow inner petals sprinkled with sparkling golden staminodes.

     

    Size: 18-24” x 24-30”
    Care: Full sun or part shade in most, well-drained soil
    Wildlife Value: Deer and Rabbit resistant, attracts butterflies & hummingbirds, great cut flower
    Awards: American Peony Society Gold Medal, American Peony Society Award for Landscape Merit

    Hybridized in the USA in 1956 by Walter Mains

  • Penstemon strictus Rocky Mountain penstemon Z 3-8

    Spikes of deep purplish-red bells in summer

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Spikes of deep purplish-red bells in summer.  Great cut flower

    Size: 30" x 24"
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: Wyoming to Arizona
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds

    Penstemon is named for its five stamens, penta meaning five and stemon meaning stamen in Greek. Strictus means “erect.” This species introduced before 1884.

  • Penstemon tubaeflorus Great Plains Beardtongue 4-8

    Spikes of ivory bell-shaped blossoms in early summer.

    $9.25/bareroot

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    Spikes of ivory bell-shaped blossoms in early summer.  One of the most reliable, long lived penstemons.

    Size: 36"x 15"
    Care: Full sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Central Plains N., S. to TX & NE to Maine, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds and butterflies

    Penstemon is named for its five stamens, penta meaning five and stemon meaning stamen in Greek.  Collected by Englishman Thomas Nuttall (1786-1859) who searched entire No. American continent – parts of Canada, from New England west to Oregon, the South, Midwest, the Plains, the S.E., California & Hawaii, finding hundreds of new plants.

  • Phlox carolina ‘Miss Lingard’ Wedding phlox Z 5-8

    bridal white blossoms with pink eyes

    $11.95/bareroot

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    True to its common name, this 3′ tall selection bears bridal white blossoms with pink eyes from June into August

    Size: 4' x 18"
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil, resistant to powdery mildew
    Native: Cultivar of native in eastern and central U.S.
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies and hummingbirds

    Phlox is Greek meaning “flame.” The species carolina in gardens before 1889 and cultivar ‘Miss Lingard’ before 1905.