Plants for Hummingbirds

Showing 49–56 of 94 results

  • Iris missouriensis Western blue flag, Rocky Mountain iris Z 3-8

     In spring variegated, violet blue iris flowers, up to 4 per stem. Each flower has 6 perianth segments, three elongated spreading to reflexed falls have a central dark yellow-orange stripe and diverging blue lines on a white background, and three erect, more narrow, lilac-purple to dark blue standards.

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    In spring variegated, violet blue iris flowers, up to 4 per stem. Each flower has 6 perianth segments, three elongated spreading to reflexed falls have a central dark yellow-orange stripe and diverging blue lines on a white background, and three erect, more narrow, lilac-purple to dark blue standards.

    Size: 12-24” x 9-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to moist soil. Divide regularly.
    Native: Alberta and British Columbia, from Minnesota to Washington south to California east to New Mexico
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant. Attracts hummingbirds, provides pollen to bees.

    Named for the Missouri River although ironically Lewis collected it along the Blackfoot River in today’s Montana on July 5, 1806.
    Paiute Indians of eastern California and southeastern Oregon made ear drops to remedy earaches with a decoction if the Iris roots.

     

  • Kniphofia caulescens Red hot poker, Regal torch lily Z 5-10

    fat spikes of flowers open coral-red, turning pale lemon-yellow

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Evergreen perennial with short, stout stems bearing grass-like broad, grey-green leaves. Blooming July to August, fat spikes of flowers open coral-red, turning pale lemon-yellow

    Size: 3’ x 2-3’
    Care: sun in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Lesotho South Africa
    Wildlife Value: deer and rabbit resistant. Attracts hummingbirds
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit; Denver Botanic Garden Plant Select

    Introduced to gardens by Mr. T. Cooper about 1860.  1st described by French botanist Carrière in Revue Horticole in 1884

  • Kniphofia triangularis Dwarf Red hot poker Z 5-8

    From early to late summer, with dead-heading, vivid coral spikes, like a torch .

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    From early to late summer, with dead-heading, vivid coral spikes, like a torch .

    Size: 2’ x 12-18”
    Care: sun in moist to well-drained soil, Drought tolerant once established
    Native: mountain grassland & moist areas in the Eastern Cape to the Northern province of South Africa.
    Wildlife Value: This plant has everything- resistant to deer & rabbits, long blooming, great cut flowers, hummingbirds and butterflies love it.

    1st described in 1854 in Enumeratio Plantarum Omnium Hucusque Cognitarum.

  • Kniphofia uvaria Red hot poker, Torch lily Z 5-10

    Vibrant red and yellow spikes of tube-shaped flowers

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    Vibrant red and yellow spikes of tube-shaped flowers in early summer arise on leafless stems (called a scape) from a basal clump of strap-like leaves

    Size: 2-3’ x 12-15”
    Care: sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: South Africa
    Wildlife Value: deer & rabbit resistant, attracts hummingbirds

    Introduced to English gardens c. 1700 and called Alöe uvaria then renamed by English botanist Wm. Jackson Hooker. The Gardeners Dictionary (1783): “The flowers are produced in close thick spikes, upon stalks near three feet high, They are of an Orange colour…”  Illustrated in Curtis’ Botanical Garden 80 (1 Nov 1854).

  • Liatris aspera Rough blazing star Z 4-9

    Feathery purple buttons along tall spike

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Feathery purple buttons along tall spike in late summer: August-October, after all other Liatris are done flowering.

    Size: 24”-30” x 12”-18”
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil
    Native: So. Canada, much of eastern 3/4th of U.S.
    Wildlife Value: attract butterflies (favorite nectar for Monarchs and Buckeyes) & hummingbirds.

    Aspera is Latin meaning rough.  1st collected by Frenchman André Michaux (1746-1802) who spent 11 years in America collecting hundreds of new plants.

  • Lilium canadense, Z 2-6

    Showy, drooping bell-shaped flowers from lemon to dark orange in color with conspicuous red spots on the inside

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    Showy, drooping bell-shaped flowers from lemon to dark orange in color with conspicuous red spots on the inside

    Size: 3-8' X 2-3'
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained, slightly acidic soil
    Native: Upper Great Lakes & southern Canada
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies and hummingbirds

    Introduced to gardens from its native North America by Jacques Cartier, 1535. Also collected by Pehr Kalm who sent it to Linnaeus. Listed in the 1873 catalog of Leichtlin’schen Gartens in Baden-Baden.

  • Lilium lancifolium Tiger lily Z 3-7

    Late summer, orange, recurved blossoms with black spots

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Late summer,  nodding orange, recurved blossoms with black spots.  Fun fact – its “seeds” are small bulbils that grow where each leaf meets the stem.  The bulbils drop and in 2 years create a new plant.

    Can not ship to: Delaware and Maryland.

    Size: 2-5' x 12"
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Asia

    Referred to in Chinese literature as long ago as the 10th century, growing it in rows as a vegetable and claimed it brought the painted dragon to life. William Kerr sent the Tiger lily from Canton China to Kew in England in 1804. A Tiger lily in Wonderland’s looking glass garden told Alice “We can talk…when there is anybody worth talking to.”

  • Lilium regale Regal lily

    white trumpet flushed with purple, extremely fragrant

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    Midsummer, pearly white trumpet flushed with purple stripes on the outside of the petals, extremely fragrant

    Size: 4' x 12"
    Care: Sun, moist well-drained soil
    Native: Western China

    In 1905 Ernest Henry “Chinese” Wilson discovered the Trumpet lily blanketing the Min River Valley. Carrying the bulbs out, an avalanche broke his leg as he walked up a narrow mountain trail. Continuing, Wilson faced an oncoming donkey train. To allow the donkeys to pass, he lay down as the donkeys stepped over his body, one-by-one. He walked with a limp the rest of his life, his “lily limp.” Of the hundreds of plants he found in Asia this was his favorite.