Plants for Hummingbirds

Showing 17–24 of 87 results

  • Delphinium vestitum syn. D. chitralicum syn. D. rectivenium, qian lie cui que in China, Clothed Delphinium, Flowers of India Z 6-10

    Spikes of purple-blue with deep black centers rise above large rounded leaves. Blooms in August-Sept

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    Spikes of purple-blue with deep black centers rise above large rounded leaves. Blooms in August-Sept

    Size: 24” x10”
    Care: full sun to part shade
    Native: Himalayas
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & butterflies

    Nathaniel Wallich had already described Delphinium vestitum but the name was validly published by John Forbes Royle in 1834.

  • Delphinium x formosum ‘Belladonna’ Garland delphinium Z 4-8

    June & repeat in September pale sky blue graceful, short spikes

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    June & repeat in September pale sky blue graceful, short spikes

    Size: 2- 3’ x 12”
    Care: Sun well-drained soil. Do not cut back in fall. Delphiniiums have hollow stems where moisture will collect and kill the plant (crown rot) over winter.

    Delphinium, named by Dioscorides, is Greek for “dolphin.” In 1597 Gerard wrote that the Delphinium leaf paralyzed scorpions and all venomous beasts. D. x formosum called “the finest garden hybrid” of the early 19th century. It was “raised by Mr. G. Moore, a nurseryman of East Dereham, Norfolk.” George Phillips, (1933). ‘Belladonna’ hybridized in 1800’s as cutting flowers. Blooms last long in the vase. In the July 1872 issue of “the Garden” Wm. Robinson called this “too seldom seen” and “a great ornament.”

  • Dianthus carthusianorum Clusterhead PinkDianthus carthusianorum Carthusian pink, Clusterhead pink Z 5-9

    Deep reddish pink flowers atop wiry stems from June until frost

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Rosy carmine pink flowers atop wiry stems from June until frost

    Size: 16" x 8"
    Care: sun in moist well-drained soil.
    Native: Central and southern Europe
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds. Deer resistant.

    The common name “pink” is from “pinct” referring to the jagged edge of the petals. The word “pink” referring to the color, came from the fact that most of the Dianthus are pink.   This species may have come into gardens with the Carthusian monks in the 1100’s.

  • Dicentra eximia syn Lamprocapnos , Fringed bleeding heart Z 4-8

    May to October, dangling rose pink heart-shaped panicles

    $9.75/pot

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    May to October, dangling rose pink heart-shaped panicles.

    Size: 8” x 8”
    Care: Part shade, moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Mountains from New York to Georgia
    Wildlife Value: Nectar source for hummingbirds & White swallowtail butterfly.

    Dicentra derived from Greek dis meaning two and kentros meaning spurs. Introduced to gardens by John Bartram in mid-1700’s.   Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll, mother of mixed perennial borders, in 1908.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Dicentra spectablis Alba White bleeding heart Z 3-9

    Dangling alabaster, heart shaped blossoms

    $14.25/bareroot

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    May – June classic sprays of dangling alabaster, heart shaped blossoms. One of the best.

    Size: 36" x 18"
    Care: Part shade to shade in moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: Japan & China
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds
    Awards: England's Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Dicentra derived from Greek dis meaning “two” and kentros meaning “spurs” because the flowers have two spurs. Spectabilis means “worthy of notice.” This white form was available by 1877.

  • Dicentra spectablis Bleeding Heart Z 3-9

    May - June legendary dangling dark pink (or white) heart shaped blossoms.  One of the best.

    $13.25/bareroot

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    From May through June legendary dangling, dark pink(or white) heart-shaped blossoms. One of the best.

    Size: 36" x 18"
    Care: Part shade to shade, moist to moist well-drained soil.
    Native: Japan
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit

    Dicentra derived from Greek dis meaning “two” and kentros meaning “spurs” because the flowers have two spurs.  Spectabilis means “worthy of notice.” The Bleeding heart was a favorite garden plant in China for centuries before its discovery by Europeans.  Introduced to the West in 1846 after Robert Fortune found it growing on the Island of Chusan and sent it to the Horticultural Society of London.  It became an immediate sensation in England.  By 1866 the Bleeding heart was available in America

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Digitalis ferruguina Rusty foxglove Z 4-7

    Mottled rusty bells with brown speckled throats & hairy lips clothe the spikes in mid-summer.  One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated 94 (2013)

    $12.55/bareroot

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    Mottled rusty bells with brown speckled throats & hairy lips clothe the spikes in mid-summer.  One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated 94 (2013)

    Size: 4-5' x 18"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant
    Native: Southern Europe and Balkans
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit. Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden Great Plant Pick.

    The word ‘fox’ is said to be a corruption of ‘folk,’ meaning the ‘little folk’ or fairies.  Foxgloves reputedly had the power to ward off witches and return children kidnapped by fairies Ferruginea means rust-colored from ferric describing metal containing iron. This species in garden cultivation since at least the 1590’s.

  • Digitalis grandiflora Yellow foxglove Z 4-8

    Early to midsummer spires of moon yellow bells dress the flower spikes. Will rebloom if deadhead.

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Early to midsummer spires of moon yellow bells dress the flower spikes.  Will rebloom if deadheaded.

    Size: 36" x 18"
    Care: Part sun, moist well-drained soil.
    Native: Europe to Siberia and south to Turkey
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit. Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden Great Plant Pick.

    Liberty Hyde Bailey called foxgloves: “old-fashioned and dignified…  The word ‘fox’ is often said to be a corruption of ‘folk,’ meaning the ‘little folk’ or fairies.”  Foxgloves reputedly had the power to ward off witches and return children kidnapped by fairies. This species grown in the Eichstätt Garden, the garden of Johann Konrad von Gemmingen, prince bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria, c. 1600. Common in Elizabethan cottage gardens.