Plants for Hummingbirds

Showing 17–24 of 91 results

  • Corydalis sempervirens syn. Capnoides sempervirens Rock harlequin, Fumitory Z 5-7

    Pink and yellow bicolor from spring to summer

    $8.25/bareroot

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    RESEEDING SHORT-LIVED PERENNIAL

    Pink and yellow bicolor from spring to summer

    Size: 10-12” x 10-12”
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist well drained soil
    Native: from Nova Scotia west to Alaska, south to North Carolina

    Corydalis is Greek for “lark” korydalos, referring to the shape of flower resembling a lark’s spur.    Cultivated in American gardens before 1900. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Corylus americana American Hazelnut, Filbert Z 4-9

    In spring, showy male flowers on 2-3" long catkins. Female flowers appear in small, reddish catkins grow into half inch long, egg-shaped edible nuts. Fall color ranges from orange, rose, purplish red, yellow and green.

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    $17.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    In spring, showy male flowers on 2-3″ long catkins. Female flowers appear in small, reddish catkins grow into half inch long, egg-shaped edible nuts. Fall color ranges from orange, rose, purplish red, yellow and green.

    Size: 10-16’ x 8-1’
    Care: sun in any soil
    Native: E. North America including Wisconsin
    Wildlife Value: Exceptionally high value to wildlife. Pheasant, Quail, Turkey, Grouse, Turkey & Blue Jay and small animals eat the nuts. Pollen source for bees, host to many caterpillars both butterflies and moths. Branches make good nesting sites for songbirds. Black walnut tolerant.

    Described by Thomas Walter in 1788. Food for several Native American tribes. Medicinal for Cherokee, Iroquois, Menominee, Meskwaki and Ojibwa, to remedy hives, fever, headaches, pain of baby’s teething, hay fever and induce vomiting.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Delphinium exaltatum Tall Larkspur

    lavender or purple spikes of trumpets

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Fabulous, lavender or purple spikes of trumpets on tall stems in July to August.

    Size: 3-5' x 9"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well drained soil. Withstands winds, no staking needed. Not fussy like fancy hybrids.
    Native: From Minnesota to Alabama, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attract hummingbirds

    Delphinium, named by Dioscorides, is Greek for “dolphin” due to the resemblance of the flower shape.  Cultivated by Jefferson at Monticello where he planted it in the NW quarter of the outer border in March 1811.

  • Delphinium grandiflorum ‘Blue Butterfly’ Z 4-8

    Picture a dangling blue elf cap for the flower.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Picture a dangling cornflower blue elf cap for the flower. Blooms in June and repeats if deadheaded.

    Size: 12-18" x 9"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil.
    Native: Siberia, China & Japan
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds

    Dr. Johann Ammann sent the seeds of this Delphinium from the Imperial Academy at St. Petersburg to Peter Collinson in England in 1736. ‘Blue Butterfly’ selected by 1900. Gertrude Jekyll, mother of the mixed perennial garden valued ‘Blue Butterfly’ for its “pure blue,” late 1800’s.

  • Delphinium tricorne Dwarf larkspur, Spring larkspur Z 4-8

    Spring ephemeral of blue delphinium elf-cap spikes – an absolute delight. Substitute these for tulips, a favorite food of deer and rabbits

    $8.25/bareroot

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    Available to order in Spring only

    Spring ephemeral of blue delphinium elf-cap spikes – an absolute delight. Substitute these for tulips, a favorite food of deer and rabbits

    Size: 18-24” – 6-9”
    Care: sun to shade in moist well-drained to moist soil
    Native: PA to IA, s. to GA, AL, AR & e. OK
    Wildlife Value: food for hummingbirds and butterflies; deer & rabbit resistant.

    Collected by Andre Michaux c. 1800. Cherokee used this for heart ailments and reported that it makes cows intoxicated and they die. The name tricorne comes from the 3-cornered shape of its seeds, like the shape of colonial hats with brims turned up on three sides.

  • Delphinium vestitum syn. D. chitralicum syn. D. rectivenium, qian lie cui que in China, Clothed Delphinium, Flowers of India Z 6-10

    Spikes of purple-blue with deep black centers rise above large rounded leaves. Blooms in August-Sept

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Spikes of purple-blue with deep black centers rise above large rounded leaves. Blooms in August-Sept

    Size: 24” x10”
    Care: full sun to part shade
    Native: Himalayas
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & butterflies

    Nathaniel Wallich had already described Delphinium vestitum but the name was validly published by John Forbes Royle in 1834.

  • Delphinium x formosum ‘Belladonna’ Garland delphinium Z 4-8

    June & repeat in September pale sky blue graceful, short spikes

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    OUT OF STOCK

    June & repeat in September pale sky blue graceful, short spikes

    Size: 2- 3’ x 12”
    Care: Sun well-drained soil. Do not cut back in fall. Delphiniiums have hollow stems where moisture will collect and kill the plant (crown rot) over winter.

    Delphinium, named by Dioscorides, is Greek for “dolphin.” In 1597 Gerard wrote that the Delphinium leaf paralyzed scorpions and all venomous beasts. D. x formosum called “the finest garden hybrid” of the early 19th century. It was “raised by Mr. G. Moore, a nurseryman of East Dereham, Norfolk.” George Phillips, (1933). ‘Belladonna’ hybridized in 1800’s as cutting flowers. Blooms last long in the vase. In the July 1872 issue of “the Garden” Wm. Robinson called this “too seldom seen” and “a great ornament.”

  • Dianthus carthusianorum Clusterhead Pink

    Deep reddish pink flowers atop wiry stems from June until frost

    $8.25/bareroot

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    Rosy carmine pink flowers atop wiry stems from June until frost

    Size: 16" x 8"
    Care: Full sun moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Deer resistant & drought tolerant
    Native: Central and southern Europe
    Wildlife Value: attract hummingbirds

    Clusterhead pink may have come into gardens with the Carthusian monks in the 1100’s. American gardens since 1800’s.