Plants for Hummingbirds

Showing 73–80 of 81 results

  • Silene virginica Fire pink Z 4-8 Short-lived perennial, 2-3 years

    Real red, hence the name Fire (not pink in color), flowers of five notched petals flaring out from a tube, blooms late spring and early summer. Named “pink” because it is botanically in the family known as Pinks, Dianthus.

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    Real red, hence the name Fire (not pink in color), flowers of five notched petals flaring out from a tube, blooms late spring and early summer. Named “pink” because it is botanically in the family known as Pinks, Dianthus.

    Size: 12-18” x 9-18”
    Care: shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil.
    Native: nearly entire eastern half of No. America. Endangered species in WI.
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds.

    1st collected by John Banister (1654-1692) Anglican minister who searched and found many plants in the Virginia colony, losing his life when he was accidentally shot along the Roanoke River while collecting plants.

  • Spigelia marilandica Carolina pink, Woodland pinkroot Z 5-9

    Stems topped with showy red tubes and fireworks-like yellow, five-pointed stars flare  atop the tubes in  late spring to early summer  and later in the north.  Deadhead for rebloom

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    Stems topped with showy red tubes and fireworks-like yellow, five-pointed stars flare  atop the tubes in  late spring to early summer  and later in the north.  Deadhead for rebloom

    Size: 12-24” x 6-18”
    Care: part to full shade in most well-drained soil, tolerates wet soil
    Native: NJ to Fl west to TX
    Wildlife Value: nectar for hummingbirds; deer resistant
    Awards: 2011 Theodore Klein Plant Award Winner

    Cherokee used this to purge parasites from intestines. In garden by 1753. Philip Miller’s Dictionary “the plant “is esteemed as the best medicine (in North America) yet known for the worms.” (1768)  According to Jacob Bigelow in American Medical Botany, 1817 one doctor used it as a purgative and another as a narcotic.

  • Sporobolus heterolepsis Prairie dropseed Zone 3 – 9

    Mound of graceful thinnest of grass blades

    $11.95/bareroot

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    The description in the Chiltern Seeds catalog cannot be improved:  “This is the most elegant and refined of the North American prairie grasses …the finest texture composed of the thinnest of thin, thread-like, glossy green blades,.. in autumn turning deep orange before fading to a light copper for the winter.  In late summer the plants bear, on very slender stalks high above the foliage, unbelievably delicate, graceful flower panicles, excellent for cutting.”

    Size: 2’ x 2’
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil
    Native: from Canada in the north to Texas in the south, Wisconsin native

    Sporobolos is Greek from sporo meaning seed and ballein meaning to cast forth because the seed readily falls from the flower (or dropseed, the common name).  Ojibwa “Medicine Society” used roots to cure sores & “remove bile.”

  • Stachys minima syn. Stachys spathulata Dwarf betony Z 5-9

    Emerging from a rosette of charming crinkly leaves, spikes of pink-purple trumpets bloom generously from June – July.

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    Emerging from a rosette of charming crinkly leaves, spikes of pink-purple trumpets bloom generously from June – July.

    Size: 2-6” x 15-18”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: South Africa
    Wildlife Value: Walnut tolerant, deer resistant, hummingbird plant

    Stachys is an old Greek word meaning “spike.”  This species collected from the wild before 1834.

  • Stachys officinalis syn. Betonica officinalis syn. Stachys betonica Bishop’s wort, Betony Z 4-8

    Showy reddish-purple spikes of two-lipped tubes in May and June

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Showy reddish-purple spikes of two-lipped tubes in May and June

    Size: 18-24” x 12-18” slowly spreading
    Care: sun in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe and Asia
    Wildlife Value: deer & walnut tolerant, attracts hummingbirds

    Once one of the most honored herbal medicines. Medicines were good if they had “as many virtues as Betony.” John Sauer, Colonial herbalist claimed “there is no illness brought on by cold in which Betony cannot be administered effectively.”

  • Verbena bonariensis Perennial Z 7-10, colder zones-reseeding annual

    Small purple flowers atop tall leafless stems from July to October. Great see-through blooms for growing in back, middle or front of the garden.

    $3.25/pot

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    Small purple flowers atop tall leafless stems from July to October.  Great see-through blooms for growing in back, middle or front of the garden.

    Size: 3-4’ x 8”
    Care: full sun in moist, well-drained, fertile soil - self-seeder
    Native: South America
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit & Missouri Botanic Garden Plant of Merit.

    Introduced to garden cultivation from its native Buenos Aires in 1726 by the Sherard brothers.

  • Vernonia fasciculata Prairie Ironweed Z 3-7

    Dense clusters of true royal purple August-September

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Dense clusters of true royal purple August-September

    Size: 3-4’ x 2-3’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well drained soil
    Native: so central Canada to central & eastern US
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies. Deer resistant

    Collected by André Michau (1746-1802) by 1803. Named to honor Wm. Vernon, an English botanist who collected plants in late 1600’s.  

  • Xerophyllum tenax  Turkey beard, Indian basket grass    Z 5-8

    Plume of fragrant white flowers May-August on naked stalks rising from mound of grassy foliage, actually a lily.

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    Plume of fragrant white flowers May-August on naked stalks rising from mound of grassy foliage, actually a lily.

    Size: 3-5’ x 24-30”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: British Columbia, to Montana & WY

    Several western Indian tribes wove baskets & hats from the leaves & roasted the roots for food.  Blackfoot applied the plant to wounds to stop bleeding and repair breaks & sprains.  Collected by Meriwether Lewis June 15, 1806 just east of Weippe Prairie and west of Bitterroot Mountains in Idaho.