Plants for Hummingbirds

Showing 73–80 of 87 results

  • Scabiosa columbaria f. nana Dwarf dove pincushions Z 4-8

    Lavender- blue pincushions

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Lavender- blue pincushions on this short, front-of-the-border flower that blooms for four, yes, 4, months, June to September. Deadhead to promote reblooming.

    Size: 6-12” x 12-18”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained alkaline soil
    Native: Europe
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and birds

    Different colored ones including lavender and pink described in The Garden 1872.

  • Scabiosa japonica var. alpina Alpine pincushion flower Z 4-9

    Lavender-blue pincushions over mound of gray-green foliage, blooms June-September

    Placeholder

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Lavender-blue pincushions over mound of gray-green foliage, blooms June-September

    Size: 6-12” x 12”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Japan’s subalpine meadows
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and birds

    Described by Japanese botanist Hosayoshi Takeda before 1962.

  • Scrophularia macrantha syn. Scrophularia coccinea Redbirds in a Tree, Mimbres figwort  Z 5-10

    This sub-shrub blooms from early summer until frost with white-lipped cherry-red, tubular flowers that look like a flock of inch-long, baby birds with open mouths waiting for food, each topping short stems along the branches. The margins of its oval green leaves are toothed.

    Placeholder

    Buy

    This sub-shrub blooms from early summer until frost with white-lipped cherry-red, tubular flowers that look like a flock of inch-long, baby birds with open mouths waiting for food, each topping short stems along the branches. The margins of its oval green leaves are toothed.

    Size: 2-4’ x 18” 
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil. Little to no fertilizer.
    Native: Three mountain tops in southern New Mexico (high elevations make it hardy to cold regions)
    Wildlife Value: Its nectar is one of the best feeders and attractors for hummingbirds.  Pollen and nectar also attract butterflies and bees.
    Awards: 2008 Plant Select Winner

    First collected on the Mexican Boundary Expedition by Charles Wright (1811-1885) and John Bigelow (1804-1878), “at the base of a rocky ledge near the summit of a mountain . . .a truly handsome species.” Described by Asa Gray, Torrey, John ed. Report on the United States and Mexican boundary survey Vol. 2 p. 111 (1859) https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/95705#page/2/mode/1up  

  • Scutellaria incana syn. Scutellaria canescens, Scutellaria villosa Downy skullcap Z 5-8

    Showy, open spikes of two-lipped Blue-violet florets from June-Sept  

    Placeholder

    $12.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Showy, open spikes of two-lipped Blue-violet florets from June-Sept

    Size: 2-3’ x 2’
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained acidic soil
    Native: Eastern US, west to WI, south to TX
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, hummingbirds and butterflies, deer resistant

    Described in Plantarum Novarum ex Herbario Sprengelii Centuriam 25. 1807 Johann Friedrich Theodor

  • Senna hebecarpa syn. Cassia hebecarpa Wild senna Z 4-8

    6” long taxicab yellow racemes in July – August

    $12.95/bareroot

    Buy

    6” long taxicab yellow racemes in July – August

    Size: 4’ x 2-6’
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Ontario; Maine south to Georgia and northwest to Tennessee and Wisconsin.
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies, birds & hummingbirds

    Collected before 1937. Very similar to Senna marilandica except a bit taller, flowers prettier and a slightly bulbous gland as the base of the petiole.

  • Silene regia Royal catchfly Z 5-8

    True crimson stars, brighter than a stop light

    $9.25/bareroot

    Buy

    True crimson stars, brighter than a stop light, in July – September, from the prairies.

    Size: 2-3’ x 1-2’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: from Ohio to Alabama W. to Nebraska, WI native
    Wildlife Value: hummingbird favorite.

    In Greek mythology Silene was a companion of Bacchus who was covered with foam. This plant pictured in Curtis’s Botanical Magazine, 1811

  • Silene virginica Fire pink Z 4-8 Short-lived perennial, 2-3 years

    Real red, hence the name Fire (not pink in color), flowers of five notched petals flaring out from a tube, blooms late spring and early summer. Named “pink” because it is botanically in the family known as Pinks, Dianthus.

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Real red, hence the name Fire (not pink in color), flowers of five notched petals flaring out from a tube, blooms late spring and early summer. Named “pink” because it is botanically in the family known as Pinks, Dianthus.

    Size: 12-18” x 9-18”
    Care: shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil.
    Native: nearly entire eastern half of No. America. Endangered species in WI.
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds.

    1st collected by John Banister (1654-1692) Anglican minister who searched and found many plants in the Virginia colony, losing his life when he was accidentally shot along the Roanoke River while collecting plants.

  • Spigelia marilandica Carolina pink, Woodland pinkroot Z 5-9

    Stems topped with showy red tubes and fireworks-like yellow, five-pointed stars flare  atop the tubes in  late spring to early summer  and later in the north.  Deadhead for rebloom

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK – EMAIL FOR AVAILABILITY AFTER 6/1/23

    Stems topped with showy red tubes and fireworks-like yellow, five-pointed stars flare  atop the tubes in  late spring to early summer  and later in the north.  Deadhead for rebloom

    Size: 12-24” x 6-18”
    Care: part to full shade in most well-drained soil, tolerates wet soil
    Native: NJ to Fl west to TX
    Wildlife Value: nectar for hummingbirds; deer resistant
    Awards: 2011 Theodore Klein Plant Award Winner

    Cherokee used this to purge parasites from intestines. In garden by 1753. Philip Miller’s Dictionary “the plant “is esteemed as the best medicine (in North America) yet known for the worms.” (1768)  According to Jacob Bigelow in American Medical Botany, 1817 one doctor used it as a purgative and another as a narcotic.