Plants for Hummingbirds

Showing 9–16 of 94 results

  • Calamintha nepeta ssp. nepeta syn. Clinopodium nepeta ssp. nepeta Lesser calamint Z 4-9

    Profuse violet blooms on mint-scented, gray-green foliage gives frosty image, June-October

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Profuse violet blooms on mint-scented, gray-green foliage gives frosty image,  June-October

    Size: 18-24” x 8-12”
    Native: Europe and Mediterranean
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds

    This subspecies 1st described by Linnaeus in 1753. Genus name comes from Greek kalos meaning beautiful and minthe meaning mint.  It is not, however, a mint and is not invasive.

  • Camassia quamash Wild Hyacinth, Leichtlin’s Camass Z 4-8

    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

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    OUT OF STOCK – Available for purchase in Spring only

    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

    Size: 15” x 12"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, well-drained soil
    Native: Pacific Northwest
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer & rabbit resistant

    First documented by Lewis & Clark near the Nez Perce village in the Cascade Mountains. Nez Perce hunters gave Clark a cake made with Camassia.  Important food crop for First Americans. Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll 1908.

  • Campanula alliariifolia syn. C. gundelia syn. C. kirpicznikovii Ivory Bells Z 3-7

    July-August, creamy white bells dangle on spires above heart-leaved foliage. Vigorous. Cut back to promote 2nd flowering

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    July-August, creamy white bells dangle on spires above heart-leaved foliage. Vigorous. Cut back to promote 2nd flowering

    Size: 18-24” x 18
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: the Caucasus and Turkey
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and birds

    Campanula is Latin meaning “little bell.” Described by Carl Ludwig von Willdenow in 1798
    Highly touted by Graham Stuart Thomas, who once referred to it as a “picture of poise and beauty,”

  • Campsis radicans Trumpet vine Z 5-9

    Huge, gorgeous orange trumpets on vigorous vine

    $15.95/bareroot

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    Mid summer into autumn  – huge, gorgeous orange trumpets on vigorous vine

    Size: 30’ x 3’ at base
    Care: sun moist well-drained soil
    Native: PA to IL & south as far as Florida
    Wildlife Value: Hummingbird magnet.

    In garden cultivation in America since 1600’s.  Collected in 1640’s by English gardener Tradescant the Younger. John Bartram grew it in his Philadelphia nursery nearly 300 years ago.  Campsis is derived from the Greek word kampsis referring to the flower’s curved stamens.  Radicans from radicant meaning “having rooted stems.” The bloom is “a most splendid sight,” according to Breck in 1851.  Per Liberty Hyde Bailey in 1912: “The native trumpet creeper is very common in the southern woodlands and fields (with) a great variety in brilliancy of the blossoms.  This is an excellent plant for covering the bare trunks of palmettos.”  Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Caragana rosea Pink peashrub Z 3-8

    Rose-pink , pea like flowers May-June on prior years wood. Flowers give way to slender yellowish-green seed pods that mature to brown in late summer. Yellowish fall color.

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    Rose-pink , pea like flowers May-June on prior years wood. Flowers give way to slender yellowish-green seed pods that mature to brown in late summer. Yellowish fall color.

    Size: 3-4’ x 3-4’
    Care: full sun to light shade in dry to medium, well-drained soil. Perfom well in areas with hot summers and cold winters.
    Native: Slopes and valleys in central and NE China, Japan and Russia
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer resistant

    Plants are considered to be xerophilous (capable of thriving in dry, hot locations). Described by Nicolai Stepanowitsch Turczaninow in Primitiae Florae Amurensis 470. 1859

  • Chaenorhinum glareosum Dwarf snapdragon Z 5-9

    Rare plant. Spires of tiny purple to blue trumpets with yellow throats spring, summer & fall. Love this itsy plant.

    $8.75/pot

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    Rare plant. Spires of tiny purple to blue trumpets with yellow throats spring, summer & fall. Love this itsy plant.

    Size: 4” x 9-12” semi-trailing cushion
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Spain
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and birds.

    1st described in 1838. Chaenorhinum means “honey lotus” in Greek.

  • Chrysanthemum serotinum syn. Leucanthemella serotina Autumn oxeye, Giant daisy Z 4-8

    Pure white daisies with golden centers, 2-3” across, aren’t just for summer. This one celebrates the fall.

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    Chrysanthemum serotinum syn. Leucanthemella serotina Autumn oxeye, Giant daisy Z 4-8
    Pure white daisies with golden centers, 2-3” across, aren’t just for summer. This one celebrates the fall.

    Size: 4-7’ x 12-24”
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: SE Europe & Balkans
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    Described by Linnaeus 1753. The Gardeners Dictionary (1783): “This grows naturally in North America but hath long been preserved in English gardens. …each(stalk) being terminated by a large, white, radiated flower; these appear in September. It multiplies very fast by its creeping roots.”

  • Clematis recta ‘Purpurea’ Ground clematis, Flammula clematis POISONOUS Z 3-9

    Fragrant star-shaped white blooms May-July on attractive purple foliage, fading to green by mid-summer.

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    Fragrant star-shaped white blooms May-July on attractive purple foliage, fading to green by mid-summer. Can be trained to climb or left as a groundcover. Handling plant may cause contact dermatitis or allergic reaction

    Size: 3-5' x 2-4'
    Care: sun to part shade with moist well-drained soil. Pinch back buds to maintain purple foliage longer-when plant blooms foliage fades to green.
    Native: Eastern, southern and central Europe.
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds, butterflies & bees; Deer and Black Walnut tolerant

    Recommended for its purple foliage in The Gardens of Gertrude Jekyll.