Plants for Hummingbirds

Showing 5–8 of 78 results

  • Antirrhinum hispanicum ‘Roseum’ syn. A. glutinosum Perennial snapdragon, Spanish snapdragon Z 5-8

    Rose pink, with yellow above the lower lip, snapdragon-shaped blooms in spring, repeats in fall. Fuzzy, silver-grey foliage

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    Antirrhinum hispanicum ‘Roseum’ syn. A. glutinosum Perennial snapdragon, Spanish snapdragon  Z 5-8
    Rose pink, with yellow above the lower lip, snapdragon-shaped blooms in spring and repeats in fall. Fuzzy, glaucous, silver-grey foliage. Excellent for places you want low-growing, drought tolerant flowers.

    Size: 12” x 2’
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Spain & Morocco
    Wildlife Value: deer resistant, attracts hummingbirds

    Described in 1852 in Pugillus Plantarum Novarum Africae Borealis Hispaniaeque Australis

  • Aquilegia canadensis, Canada Columbine Z 3-9

    May - June scarlet and yellow columbines

    $9.95/bareroot

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    Aquilegia canadensis Canada Columbine Z 3-9
    May – June, scarlet and yellow columbines

    Size: 24-36”x 12”
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Eastern Canada to Florida, west to New Mexico, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: Rich, sugary nectar important food for ruby-throated hummingbirds. Buntings and finches eat the seeds. Sole food source for columbine duskywing caterpillar.

    Seeds are fragrant when crushed, used by Omaha, Ponca and Pawnee as perfume. Pawnee used the plant as a love charm by rubbing pulverized seeds in palm of hand and endeavoring to shake hand of desired person. Crushed seeds also used to cure fever and headaches. Cherokee made a tea for heart trouble. The Iroquois used the plant to cure poisoning and to detect people who were bewitched. Grown by Englishman Tradescant the Elder in 1632. He may have received it from France. Cultivated by Washington & Jefferson.

  • Calamintha nepeta ssp. nepeta syn. Clinopodium nepeta ssp. nepeta Lesser calamint Z 4-9

    Profuse violet blooms on mint-scented, gray-green foliage gives frosty image, June-October

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Calamintha nepeta ssp. nepeta syn. Clinopodium nepeta ssp. nepeta Lesser calamint  Z 4-9
    Profuse violet blooms on mint-scented, gray-green foliage gives frosty image,  June-October

    Size: 18-24” x 8-12”
    Native: Europe and Mediterranean
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds

    This subspecies 1st described by Linnaeus in 1753. Genus name comes from Greek kalos meaning beautiful and minthe meaning mint.  It is not, however, a mint and is not invasive.

  • Camassia quamash Wild Hyacinth, Leichtlin’s Camass Z 4-8

    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

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    $6.95/3" pot

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    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

    Size: 15” x 12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, well-drained soil
    Native: Pacific Northwest
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer & rabbit resistant

    First documented by Lewis & Clark near the Nez Perce village in the Cascade Mountains. Nez Perce hunters gave Clark a cake made with Camassia. First seen on the Wieppe prairie in September 1805, just west of the Rocky Mountains. Important food crop for First Americans