Plants for Hummingbirds

Showing 9–16 of 81 results

  • Chaenorhinum glareosum Dwarf snapdragon Z 5-9

    Rare plant. Spires of tiny purple to blue trumpets with yellow throats spring, summer & fall. Love this itsy plant.

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    Rare plant. Spires of tiny purple to blue trumpets with yellow throats spring, summer & fall. Love this itsy plant.

    Size: 4” x 9-12” semi-trailing cushion
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Spain
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and birds.

    1st described in 1838. Chaenorhinum means “honey lotus” in Greek.

  • Comptonia peregrina Sweet Fern Z 2-6 SHRUB

    Grown for it’s fern like leaves, this small shrub flowers in spring with insignificant yellow flowers followed by brown nutlets. Foliage is fragrant when crushed.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Grown for it’s fern like leaves, this small shrub flowers in spring with insignificant yellow flowers followed by brown nutlets. Foliage is fragrant when crushed.

    Size: 2-5’ x 4’ spreading
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, well-drained to well-drained soil. Prefers acidic, but will grow in other types of soil as well. Drought and salt tolerant.
    Native: Eastern North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies, & birds. Larval host plant for a wide variety of moths, including the Io moth & several Sphinx moth species, and the Anise Swallowtail butterfly. Deer resistant. Nitrogen fixer.

    Genus name honors Henry Compton (1632-1713), Bishop of London and patron of botany.
    Peregrina means exotic or immigrant. Many Native Americans (Algonquin, Cherokee, Chippewa, Delaware, Menominee, Delaware, Potawatomi) used this plant for a wide variety of purposes: Crushed leaves inhaled for headache. Leaf infusions for: round worms, fevers, beverage, blood purifier, blisters, clear mucus from lungs, bladder inflammation, rash from poison ivy, swelling, flux, stomach cramps, itch.   Fragrance leaves- burned or crushed for incense in ceremony, perfume,   Decoction – childbirth, tonic,   Other: sprinkle on medicine to poison enemy, prevent blueberries from spoiling, leaves in fire to make smudge to ward off mosquitoes.
    Collected before 1753.

  • Corydalis sempervirens syn. Capnoides sempervirens Rock harlequin, Fumitory Z 5-7

    Pink and yellow bicolor from spring to summer

    $5.95/bareroot

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    RESEEDING SHORT-LIVED PERENNIAL

    Pink and yellow bicolor from spring to summer

    Size: 10-12” x 10-12”
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist well drained soil
    Native: from Nova Scotia west to Alaska, south to North Carolina

    Corydalis is Greek for “lark” korydalos, referring to the shape of flower resembling a lark’s spur.    Cultivated in American gardens before 1900. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Corylus americana American Hazelnut, Filbert Z 4-9

    In spring, showy male flowers on 2-3" long catkins. Female flowers appear in small, reddish catkins grow into half inch long, egg-shaped edible nuts. Fall color ranges from orange, rose, purplish red, yellow and green.

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    $17.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    In spring, showy male flowers on 2-3″ long catkins. Female flowers appear in small, reddish catkins grow into half inch long, egg-shaped edible nuts. Fall color ranges from orange, rose, purplish red, yellow and green.

    Size: 10-16’ x 8-1’
    Care: sun in any soil
    Native: E. North America including Wisconsin
    Wildlife Value: Exceptionally high value to wildlife. Pheasant, Quail, Turkey, Grouse, Turkey & Blue Jay and small animals eat the nuts. Pollen source for bees, host to many caterpillars both butterflies and moths. Branches make good nesting sites for songbirds. Black walnut tolerant.

    Described by Thomas Walter in 1788. Food for several Native American tribes. Medicinal for Cherokee, Iroquois, Menominee, Meskwaki and Ojibwa, to remedy hives, fever, headaches, pain of baby’s teething, hay fever and induce vomiting.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Delphinium exaltatum Tall Larkspur

    lavender or purple spikes of trumpets

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Fabulous, lavender or purple spikes of trumpets on tall stems in July to August.

    Size: 3-5' x 9"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well drained soil. Withstands winds, no staking needed. Not fussy like fancy hybrids.
    Native: From Minnesota to Alabama, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attract hummingbirds

    Delphinium, named by Dioscorides, is Greek for “dolphin” due to the resemblance of the flower shape.  Cultivated by Jefferson at Monticello where he planted it in the NW quarter of the outer border in March 1811.

  • Delphinium grandiflorum ‘Blue Butterfly’ Z 4-8

    Picture a dangling blue elf cap for the flower.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Picture a dangling cornflower blue elf cap for the flower. Blooms in June and repeats if deadheaded.

    Size: 12-18" x 9"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil.
    Native: Siberia, China & Japan
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds

    Dr. Johann Ammann sent the seeds of this Delphinium from the Imperial Academy at St. Petersburg to Peter Collinson in England in 1736. ‘Blue Butterfly’ selected by 1900. Gertrude Jekyll, mother of the mixed perennial garden valued ‘Blue Butterfly’ for its “pure blue,” late 1800’s.

  • Delphinium tricorne Dwarf larkspur, Spring larkspur Z 4-8

    Spring ephemeral of blue delphinium elf-cap spikes – an absolute delight. Substitute these for tulips, a favorite food of deer and rabbits

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    OUT OF STOCK – Available to order in Spring only

    Spring ephemeral of blue delphinium elf-cap spikes – an absolute delight. Substitute these for tulips, a favorite food of deer and rabbits

    Size: 18-24” – 6-9”
    Care: sun to shade in moist well-drained to moist soil
    Native: PA to IA, s. to GA, AL, AR & e. OK
    Wildlife Value: food for hummingbirds and butterflies; deer & rabbit resistant.

    Collected by Andre Michaux c. 1800. Cherokee used this for heart ailments and reported that it makes cows intoxicated and they die. The name tricorne comes from the 3-cornered shape of its seeds, like the shape of colonial hats with brims turned up on three sides.

  • Delphinium vestitum syn. D. chitralicum syn. D. rectivenium, qian lie cui que in China, Clothed Delphinium, Flowers of India Z 6-10

    Spikes of purple-blue with deep black centers rise above large rounded leaves. Blooms in August-Sept

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    Spikes of purple-blue with deep black centers rise above large rounded leaves. Blooms in August-Sept

    Size: 24” x10”
    Care: full sun to part shade
    Native: Himalayas
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & butterflies

    Nathaniel Wallich had already described Delphinium vestitum but the name was validly published by John Forbes Royle in 1834.