Plants for Hummingbirds

Showing 25–32 of 81 results

  • Digitalis thapsi Foxglove Z 5-9

    Shortish spikes of purple-rose spotted trumpets

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Shortish spikes of pale purple-rose spotted trumpets in summer. True perennial.

    Size: 18” x 12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: Spain

    Grown in the botanical gardens of Moscow by 1752.

  • Elsholtzia stauntonii  Chinese mint shrub  Z 4-8

    Tube-shaped purple flowers ascend in spires in fall on this subshrub that dies back in colder areas to regrow from the roots in spring. Valuable for its late bloom and fragrant foliage.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Tube-shaped purple flowers ascend in spires in fall on this subshrub that dies back in colder areas to regrow from the roots in spring. Valuable for its late bloom and fragrant foliage.

    Size: 3-5’ x 3-5'
    Care: sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: hills, mountainsides and river banks in Gansu, Hebei, Henan, Shaanxi, Shanxi, China

    Naemd for name Prussian horticultulurist and doctor Johann Sigismund Elsholtz (1623-1688). This species described in 1833.

  • Epilobium angustifolium syn. Chamaenerion angustifolium Fireweed Z 2-7

    Bright pink to lilac purple flowers June-September atop red stems covered in willow-like leaves

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Bright pink to lilac purple flowers June-September atop red stems covered in willow-like leaves

    Size: 2-6’ x 3’ spreading
    Care: Sun to part shade in dry to moist well drained soil
    Native: Circum-polar to the temperate northern hemisphere (Wisconsin native)
    Wildlife Value: Attracts hummingbirds, bees, butterflies and other pollinators. Host for Fireweed Clearwing moth & Nessus Sphinx moth.

    Common name comes from its quick reappearance after a wildfire. First Nations used fireweed externally for burns and other skin conditions, and drank a tea for gastro-intestinal and bronchial problems. Its shoots eaten as a vegetable and young leaves added to salads. Fireweed yields a honey so prized that some Canadian beekeepers drive – or even fly – their hives to areas rich in fireweed for the blossoming season.

  • Hemerocallis ‘Hyperion’

    Midsummer, fragrant lemon yellow trumpets

    $8.45/bareroot

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    Midsummer, fragrant lemon yellow trumpets

    Size: 36" x 12"
    Care: Sun, moist well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.

    Hybrid origin, bred in 1925 and still popular today.

  • Hemerocallis multiflorus Many-flower daylily in China called duo hua xuan cao Z 4-8

    Elegant, tall, upright sunshine yellow flowers on this species daylily

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Elegant, tall, upright sunshine yellow flowers on this species daylily.  Grow for its height & unrivaled number of flowers.  Each scape (leafless stem) will produce up to 100 blooms so that this blooms an extraordinary length of time, July-September

    Size: 36-40” x 18-24”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: openings in forests on hills in province Honan at Ki Kung Shan, China
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds

    This species grown by Rev. C. Woolly Dod in Malpas, Cheshire England in 1880, The Garden, an Illustrated Weekly Journal of Gardening. Hemerocallis is Greek meaning “flower for a day.”   

  • Hesperaloe parviflora Red Yucca Z 6-9

    Cerise scarlet trumpets up and down the flower spike in summer

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    Cerise scarlet trumpets up and down the flower spike in summer

    Size: 3’ x 5’
    Care: sun moist well-drained to dry soil
    Native: Europe, west & central Asia
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies & hummingbirds. Deer and rabbit tolerant,

    Named by Dr. George Engelmann, a German physician and plant fanatic who emigrated to America in the early 1800’s, settling in St. Louis.

  • Heuchera sanguinea Coral bells, Alumroot Z 3-8

    Rosy red bells crown 12" tall wiry stems

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Tiny, rosy red bells crown 12″ tall wiry stems in May and June. Kidney shaped marbled foliage.

    Size: 12" x 12"
    Care: sun to part shade moist well-drained soil. Tolerates Walnut toxicity.
    Native: Western U.S.- Rocky Mountains
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds

    Heuchera named for Johann Heinrich von Heucher (1677-1747) professor of medicine at Wittenburg University. First named by Dr. George Englemann, Geman physician and avid botanist who immigrated from Germany to St. Louis. Sanguinea refers to the red flower color. Popular in the 1880’s.

  • Heuchera versicolor syn. H. rubescens var. versicolor Pink alumroot Z 4-10

    Tiny pink bells on narrow inflorescence blooming mid to late summer

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Tiny pink bells on narrow inflorescence blooming mid to late summer

    Size: 8-12” x 12"
    Care: prefers part shade in moist well-drained to well drained soil, can grow in sun with moist soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: southwestern US
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds

    First collected in 1904 on damp, shady bluffs of the Black Range in New Mexico, accd. to Edward Lee Greene.

    The roots are astringent and can also be used as an alum substitute, used in fixing dyes. Was also used medicinally for fever, diarrhea, venereal disease, liver ailments, eyewash, colic and animal care.  Heuchera is named for Johann Heinrich von Heucher (1677-1747), while rubescens means becoming red or reddish, and versicolor means variously colored.