Plants for Hummingbirds

Showing 13–16 of 85 results

  • Chrysanthemum serotinum syn. Leucanthemella serotina Autumn oxeye, Giant daisy Z 4-8

    Pure white daisies with golden centers, 2-3” across, aren’t just for summer. This one celebrates the fall.

    Placeholder

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Chrysanthemum serotinum syn. Leucanthemella serotina Autumn oxeye, Giant daisy Z 4-8
    Pure white daisies with golden centers, 2-3” across, aren’t just for summer. This one celebrates the fall.

    Size: 4-7’ x 12-24”
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: SE Europe & Balkans
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    Described by Linnaeus 1753. The Gardeners Dictionary (1783): “This grows naturally in North America but hath long been preserved in English gardens. …each(stalk) being terminated by a large, white, radiated flower; these appear in September. It multiplies very fast by its creeping roots.”

  • Clematis recta ‘Purpurea’ Ground clematis, Flammula clematis POISONOUS Z 3-9

    Fragrant star-shaped white blooms May-July on attractive purple foliage, fading to green by mid-summer.

    Placeholder

    $18.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Fragrant star-shaped white blooms May-July on attractive purple foliage, fading to green by mid-summer. Can be trained to climb or left as a groundcover. Handling plant may cause contact dermatitis or allergic reaction

    Size: 3-5' x 2-4'
    Care: sun to part shade with moist well-drained soil. Pinch back buds to maintain purple foliage longer-when plant blooms foliage fades to green.
    Native: Eastern, southern and central Europe.
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds, butterflies & bees; Deer and Black Walnut tolerant

    Recommended for its purple foliage in The Gardens of Gertrude Jekyll.

  • Comptonia peregrina Sweet Fern Z 2-6 SHRUB

    Grown for it’s fern like leaves, this small shrub flowers in spring with insignificant yellow flowers followed by brown nutlets. Foliage is fragrant when crushed.

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Grown for it’s fern like leaves, this small shrub flowers in spring with insignificant yellow flowers followed by brown nutlets. Foliage is fragrant when crushed.

    Size: 2-5’ x 4’ spreading
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, well-drained to well-drained soil. Prefers acidic, but will grow in other types of soil as well. Drought and salt tolerant.
    Native: Eastern North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies, & birds. Larval host plant for a wide variety of moths, including the Io moth & several Sphinx moth species, and the Anise Swallowtail butterfly. Deer resistant. Nitrogen fixer.

    Genus name honors Henry Compton (1632-1713), Bishop of London and patron of botany.
    Peregrina means exotic or immigrant. Many Native Americans (Algonquin, Cherokee, Chippewa, Delaware, Menominee, Delaware, Potawatomi) used this plant for a wide variety of purposes: Crushed leaves inhaled for headache. Leaf infusions for: round worms, fevers, beverage, blood purifier, blisters, clear mucus from lungs, bladder inflammation, rash from poison ivy, swelling, flux, stomach cramps, itch.   Fragrance leaves- burned or crushed for incense in ceremony, perfume,   Decoction – childbirth, tonic,   Other: sprinkle on medicine to poison enemy, prevent blueberries from spoiling, leaves in fire to make smudge to ward off mosquitoes.
    Collected before 1753.

  • Corylus americana American Hazelnut, Filbert Z 4-9

    In spring, showy male flowers on 2-3" long catkins. Female flowers appear in small, reddish catkins grow into half inch long, egg-shaped edible nuts. Fall color ranges from orange, rose, purplish red, yellow and green.

    Placeholder

    $17.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

    Buy

    In spring, showy male flowers on 2-3″ long catkins. Female flowers appear in small, reddish catkins grow into half inch long, egg-shaped edible nuts. Fall color ranges from orange, rose, purplish red, yellow and green.

    Size: 10-16’ x 8-1’
    Care: sun in any soil
    Native: E. North America including Wisconsin
    Wildlife Value: Exceptionally high value to wildlife. Pheasant, Quail, Turkey, Grouse, Turkey & Blue Jay and small animals eat the nuts. Pollen source for bees, host to many caterpillars both butterflies and moths. Branches make good nesting sites for songbirds. Black walnut tolerant.

    Described by Thomas Walter in 1788. Food for several Native American tribes. Medicinal for Cherokee, Iroquois, Menominee, Meskwaki and Ojibwa, to remedy hives, fever, headaches, pain of baby’s teething, hay fever and induce vomiting.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.