Plants for Hummingbirds

Showing 41–48 of 94 results

  • Hibiscus moscheutos Rose mallow Z 5-10

    Decadent platters of crimson, rose or white

    $11.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Decadent platters of crimson, rose or white with cerise centers in August and September on 6′ tall, very sturdy stalks. Look tropical, but they’re hardy.

    Size: 8' x 3'
    Care: Sun, moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Southern U.S.
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies and hummingbirds

    One Native American tribe used this plant to cure inflammed bladders. 1st collected by English planthunter Rev. John Banister in colonial Virginia c. 1680.  A gunman mistakenly shot and killed him while he collected plants.  Bloomed for Jefferson at Monticello in July, 1767.

  • Holodiscus discolor Creambush, Ocean spray Z 5-10

    Multistemmed shrub with dense, elegant pyramidal clusters of arching cream-colored flowers in early to mid summer. Leaves tint red in fall.

    $12.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Multi-stemmed shrub with dense, elegant pyramidal clusters of arching cream-colored flowers in early to mid summer. Leaves tint red in fall.

    Size: 4-8’ x 8’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Montana to Colorado west to the Pacific.
    Wildlife Value: nectar for hummingbirds, food for butterfly caterpillars, bird habitat.

    Hard and durable wood was used to make digging sticks, spears, harpoon shafts, bows, and arrows by nearly all coastal Native groups. A few used the wood to make sticks to barbeque salmon, fish hooks, needles for weaving and knitting, Pegs were made to use like nails. Others made wood intoarmor plating and canoe paddles.
    A few Natives made an infusion of boiled fruit to cure diarrhea, measles, chickenpox and as a blood tonic.  Collected by Meriwether Lewis in today’s Idaho on the Clearwater River, May 29, 1806 en route back east on  the Lewis and Clark Expedition.

  • Hosta ‘Blue Cadet’

    Lavender flowers late in season

    $11.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Lavender flowers late in season

    Size: 35-40” x 36”
    Care: part to full shade in moist well-drained soil
    Awards: Nancy Minks Award in 1986

    Hosta was named for Dr. Nicholas Host (1761 – 1834) the physician to the emperor of Austria and an expert on grasses. This cultivar ranked as one of the top 7 hostas and one of the top 2 hostas with blue foliage. Hybridized by Aden in 1974.

  • Hosta lancifolia Lanceleaf Hosta Z 4-9

    Glossy, midgreen lance shaped leaves with lavender trumpets soil

    $11.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Glossy, midgreen lance shaped leaves with lavender trumpets in August and September.

    Size: 18" x 30"
    Care: sun to shade in moist well-drained soil. Tolerant of Walnut toxicity
    Native: Japan
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds

    Japanese called Hostas Giboshi and ate young leaves in spring as a vegetable. Hosta was named for Dr. Nicholas Host (1761-1834) the physician to the emperor of Austria. Hostas, cultivated since at least the 12th century in Asia, were first described for Europeans by Englebert Kaempfer in 1712, doctor for the Dutch East Indian Company on Dechima Island. H. lancifolia drawings date to 1690.

  • Hosta nigrescens Black hosta, Kuro-Giboshi in Japan Z 3-8

    Lavender blooms in August-September up to 6’ tall; nearly 3’ tall vase-shaped mound of thick, cupped foliage. Resists slugs.

    Placeholder

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Lavender blooms in August-September up to 6’ tall; nearly 3’ tall vase-shaped mound of thick, cupped foliage. Resists slugs.

    Size: 32” (flowers to 6’) x 74”
    Care: sun to shade in moist soil
    Native: fertile soil in valleys and forest margins in central and north Japan

    Widely grown in Japanese temple gardens. Young leaves were eaten in Japan to ward off famine.

    Cultivated long before it was given a botanical name by Maekawa (1937/1940). The Japanese name Kuro Gibōshi translates to “black hosta.” This name dates to the floral work of Yokusai Iinuma (1910). Not actually black, but very dark-green and covered with a light gray, powdery coating initially, the leaves lose the gray covering and become very dark, polished green. The species name nigrescens also describes the dark coloring.

  • Hosta plantaginea ‘Grandiflora’ syn. H. plantaginea var. japonica, Funkia grandiflora Z 3-9

    Fragrant white trumpets in late summer and early autumn

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Fragrant white trumpets in late summer and early autumn

    Size: 24” x 36”
    Care: part sun, moist well-drained soil
    Native: China
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Hosta was named for Dr. Nicholas Host (1761 – 1834) physician to the emperor of Austria and expert on grasses.  H. plantaginea was a popular Chinese plant as long ago as the Han Dynasty (202 B.C. – 220 A.D.)  Chinese used an ointment made from H. plantaginea to reduce inflammation and fever.  M. de Guines introduced H. plantaginea to Europe when he sent it to the king of France in 1789. Gertrude Jekyll, (1848-1931) mother of the mixed perennial border, recommended H. plantaginea ‘Grandiflora’ to keep border gardens looking “full and beautiful.”

  • Hosta ventricosa Z 3-8

    rich lavender bells periscope over heart-shaped leaves

    $11.95/bareroot

    Buy

    In late summer rich lavender bells periscope over heart-shaped, prominently veined foliage.

    Can not ship to: Maryland

    Size: 20" x 36"
    Care: Part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil. Tolerate Walnut toxicity
    Native: China
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds
    Awards: Received England's Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Japanese called Hostas  Giboshi and ate young leaves in spring as a vegetable Hosta was named for Dr. Nicholas Host (1761-1834) the physician to the emperor of Austria.   Hostas, cultivated since at least the 12th century in East Asia.  Empress Josephine grew this at Malmaison. Redoute, Josephine’s botanical illustrator, painted H. ventricosa in 1805.

  • Ipomopsis aggregata Standing cypress, Skyrocket, Scarlet gilia Z 4-11 Reseeding biennial

    Showy red trumpets along leafless stem brighten summer-fall garden

    $8.95/pot

    Buy

    Showy red trumpets along leafless stem brighten summer-fall garden

    Size: 3-5’ x 12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: west from ND, south to TX to the Pacific.
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, Swallowtail butterflies and flocks of hummingbirds. Deer resistant.

    Collected by Meriwether Lewis on the Lolo Trail June 26 1806.