Plants for Hummingbirds

Showing 57–64 of 94 results

  • Lobelia cardinalis Cardinal flower Z 3-9

    Ruby, cardinal red tubes with an upper lip split in half and a lower lip like a pixie’s apron encircle the spike from August to October beckon hummingbirds to feed.

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Ruby, cardinal red tubes with an upper lip split in half and a lower lip like a pixie’s apron encircle the spike from August to October beckon hummingbirds to feed.

    Size: 3’ x 12”
    Care: sun to part shade in fertile, moist soil. Moist soil important
    Native: sun to part shade in fertile, moist soil. Moist soil important
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds
    Awards: Received England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit & Missouri Botanic Garden Plant of Merit.

    Lobelia is named for Matthias L’Obel (1538-1616) French expatriate who immigrated to England and became physician to English King James I. Tradescant the Younger introduced L. cardinalis to European gardens when he sent it to England in 1637. Later collected by Rev. John Banister who moved to colonial Virginia in 1678. A gunman mistakenly shot and killed him while he collected plants. Offered for sale in Bartram Garden’s 1783 Broadside, America’s 1st plant catalog. Cherokee cured stomach aches, worms, pain, fever, nose bleeds, rheumatism, headaches, colds and croup with Lobelia. They used the root to treat syphilis and in 1749 Swedish botanist Peter Kalm wrote that Indians used five species of Lobelia to cure venereal disease, “an infallible art of curing it.” Other Indians and colonists used the plant to induce vomiting and as an expectorant. At the end of a funeral, Meskwaki Indians threw the dried and pulverized plant into the grave. Meskwaki also chopped the roots and secretly put it in the food of “a quarrelsome pair.” Allegedly “this makes the pair love each other again.” Grown by Washington at Mount Vernon and Thomas Jefferson at Monticello. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Lobelia siphilitica Great lobelia Z 5-9

    Medium to dark blue racemes from August to October

    $11.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Medium to dark blue racemes of two-lipped flowers from August to October

    Size: 3' x 12"
    Care: Full sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Eastern United States
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies and hummingbirds.

    Introduced to gardens before 1665. Cherokee used the root to treat syphilis and in 1749 Swedish botanist Peter Kalm wrote that Indians used Lobelia to cure venereal disease, having “an infallible art of curing it.”

  • Lonicera x brownii ‘Dropmore Scarlet’ Dropmore Scarlet trumpet honeysuckle Z 2-8

    Scarlet trumpets for 5 months, hummingbird magnet

    $16.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Clusters of scarlet trumpets with orange throats bloom repeatedly from July through November

    Size: 10-12’ x 2-3’ fast growing
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil. Prune in early spring
    Wildlife Value: Hummingbirds love the red trumpet-shaped flowers.

    Cross of L. sempervirens and L. hirsuta.  This long-blooming selection made by Dr. F.L. Skinner at Dropmore Manitoba. Introduced in 1950.

  • Lupinus perennis Sun-dial lupin, Old maid’s bonnet, wild pea Z. 4-9

    Many flowered blue, pea flowered raceme May-June

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Many flowered blue, pea flowered raceme May-June

    Size: 1-2' x 12"
    Care: full sun in well drained soil. A legume, so it enriches the soil by adding nitrogen.
    Native: Maine to FL, Ontario to MN to Louisiana.
    Wildlife Value: Attracts both hummingbirds and butterflies. The only food for larvae of endangered species, Karner Blue butterfly.

    Lupinus is Latin from Lupus meaning “wolf.”  Likely sent from its native Virginia to England by Tradescant the Younger in 1637. Certainly collected by Michaux, late 1700’s.  Grown by Jefferson.  The Cherokee used this to stop bleeding.  The Menominee fattened their horses with this Lupin and made them spirited.  They rubbed the plant on themselves to give power to control the horses.

  • Monarda bradburyana Eastern beebalm, Bradbury’s Monarda Z. 5-8

    Whorls of pale pink hood-shaped petals with dark purple spots, April to June.

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Whorls of pale pink hood-shaped petals with dark purple spots, April to June.

    Size: 18-24" x 24"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Walnut toxicity resistant.
    Native: IL west to KS, south from AL to TX
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies and hummingbirds

    Named for its collector, Englishman Bradbury who searched for plants in central No. America in 1810.  In gardens by 1826.

  • Monarda didyma ‘Cambridge Scarlet’ Beebalm, Oswego tea

    Whorls of scarlet tubes and bracts

    $11.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Whorls of scarlet tubes and bracts crown 3′ tall, square stems in July and August.

    Size: 3-4' x spreading
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Grow in an open location to prevent powdery mildew. Deer resistant. Walnut toxicity resistant.
    Native: Upstate NY
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies and hummingbirds

    Didyma refers to paired stamens. Oswego Indians taught colonists how to make tea from the dried leaves. Colonists in turn showed John Bartram who sent Beebalm to Peter Collinson in England, in whose garden it grew in 1744. Widely used during the American Revolution as a substitute for tea. Gertrude Jeykll recommended the cultivated variety ‘Cambridge Scarlet’ in 1908.

  • Nicotiana langsdorffii Langsdorff’s tobacco Z 10-11, grow as annual in colder areas

    Pendulous Granny Smith apple colored, tube-shaped flowers in summer through fall.

    $5.45/pot

    Buy

    Pendulous Granny Smith apple colored, tube-shaped flowers, summer through fall.

    Size: 2-3’ x 6”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Chile and Brazil
    Wildlife Value: attract hummingbirds
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Nicotiana langsdorfii introduced in 1819.  The genus name nicotiana named after John Nicot who introduced smoking tobacco to Europe. Langsdorfii named to honor  Russian naturalist Georg Heinrich von Langsdorff, Baron de Langsdorff ( 1774 -1852), Russian consul general in Brazil and leader of Langsdorff Expedition of Brazil, 1826-1829.

  • Paeonia lactiflora Buckeye Belle Z 3-8

    Semi-double, velvety blossoms of the deepest red, almost chocolate, with large outer petals surrounding narrow inner petals sprinkled with sparkling golden staminodes.  

    $20.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Semi-double, velvety blossoms of the deepest red, almost chocolate, with large outer petals surrounding narrow inner petals sprinkled with sparkling golden staminodes.

     

    Size: 18-24” x 24-30”
    Care: Full sun or part shade in most, well-drained soil
    Wildlife Value: Deer and Rabbit resistant, attracts butterflies & hummingbirds, great cut flower
    Awards: American Peony Society Gold Medal, American Peony Society Award for Landscape Merit

    Hybridized in the USA in 1956 by Walter Mains