Black Walnut Tolerant

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  • Ajuga genevensis Geneva Bugle Z 4-9

    True blue 6” spikes in spring and early summer

    $8.95/4" pot

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    Ajuga genevensis  Geneva Bugle  Z 4-9
    True blue 6” spikes in spring and early summer. Great groundcover.

    Size: 6” x 12”
    Care: full sun to shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe
    Wildlife Value: Tolerates foot traffic. Deer and rabbit resistant.

    William Robinson, father of the mixed perennial garden, called this “among the best.” (1933).  In gardens before 1753.

  • Alcea rosea Hollyhock BIENNIAL

    Early to late summer spikes of single platters - mixed colors. The classic cottage garden flower.

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Early to late summer spikes of single platters – mixed colors. The classic cottage garden flower.

    Size: 5-8' x 24"
    Care: Sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: West Asia
    Wildlife Value: Butterfly plant, host for Painted Lady butterflies

    Cultivated in China for thousands of years where it symbolized the passing of time. They cooked the leaves for a vegetable and also ate the buds. Transported from Middle East to Europe by the Crusaders and introduced to England by the 1400’s. Culpepper, a 17th century English herbalist, claimed the plant could be used to cure ailments of the “belly, Stone, Reins, Kidneys, Bladder, Coughs, Shortness of Breath, Wheesing, … the King’s Evil,, Kernels, Chin-cough, Wounds, Bruises, Falls. . . (and) Sun-burning.” Both single and double forms grew in England by the time of Parkinson (1629). Parkinson said they came “in many and sundry colours.” John Winthrop Jr. introduced the 1st hollyhock to the New World in the 1630’s.

  • Alcea rosea var. nigra Black hollyhock BIENNIAL Z 4-9

    Early to late summer spikes of single jet-black/maroon platters.  

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    $12.25/bareroot

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    Early to late summer spikes of single jet-black/maroon platters.

     

    Size: 5-8’ x 24”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: West Asia
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and birds

    Hollyhocks have been cultivated in China for thousands of years where it symbolized the passing of time. They cooked the leaves for a vegetable and also ate the buds. Transported from Middle East to Europe by the Crusaders and introduced to England by 1573. Grown in the Eichstätt Garden, the garden of Johann Konrad von Gemmingen, prince bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria, c. 1600. Culpepper, a 17th century English herbalist, claimed the plant could be used to cure ailments of the “belly, Stone, Reins, Kidneys, Bladder, Coughs, Shortness of Breath, Wheesing, … the King’s Evil,, Kernels, Chin-cough, Wounds, Bruises, Falls. . . (and) Sun-burning.” Both single and double forms grew in England by the time of Parkinson (1629). Parkinson said they came “in many and sundry colours.” John Winthrop Jr. introduced the 1st hollyhock to the New World in the 1630’s.

    In the 1880’s Mr. W. Charter of Saffron Walden in England cultivated frilly doubles, now known as ‘Charter’s Doubles.’

  • Andropogon scoparium Little bluestem Z 5-9

    Blue gray foliage turns plum orange in fall

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Blue gray  foliage turns plum orange in fall  with wispy, feather-like seed heads

    Size: 18" x 12"
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: all No. America, Wisconsin native

    Discovered by French plant hunter André Michaux (1746-1802) in America’s prairies.  Comanche used it to relieve syphilitic sores.  Lakota made soft wispy seed heads into liners for moccasins.

  • Anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’ Windflower Z 4-8

    Pearl-like buds open to graceful single white umbels in autumn.

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Pearl-like buds open to graceful single white umbels in autumn. One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated 94 (2013)

    Size: 4-5’x 12” and spreading
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Awards: Received England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit. 2016 Perennial Plant of Year

    The Japanese anemone introduced to cultivation in the West when Robert Fortune found them growing wild at a graveyard near Shanghai in 1844. Anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’ is a sport of a cross between Japanese anemone and A. vitifolia, introduced by Lady Amherst from Nepal in 1829.  This white sport appeared in the nursery of Messier Jobert at Verdun-sur-Meuse in 1851.  He propagated it and named it for his daughter, Honorine. The name Anemone is Greek for the wind, “so called, because the flower is supposed not to open, except the wind blows.” The Gardeners’ Dictionary, 1768.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Anemone canadensis Meadow anemone Z 3-8

    Pristine pure white petal-like sepals frame many golden anthers in early summer

    $11.95/pot

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    Pristine pure white petal-like sepals frame many golden anthers in early summer

    Size: 12-24" x 12” & spreading
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist soil
    Native: North America as far south as Missouri, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: pollen for small bees
    Size: Good groundcover under trees where soil is moist, naturalized garden.

    Collected by Meriwether Lewis August 17, 1804 on the 1st leg of the Expedition. Used medicinally by many Indian groups. The roots cleared up sores and leaves stopped nose bleeds for the Chippewa. It relieved the Iroquois of worms and counteracted witch medicine. For the Meskwaki this plant uncrossed crossed eyes. Ojibwa singers used it to clear their throats and remedy lower back pain. Sioux used the root to remedy several ailments – staunch bleeding, reduce lower back pain, sore eyes, crossed eyes and twitching of eyes.  They also ate the root to clear the throat to boost good singing.

  • Anemone cylindrica Thimbleweed Z 4-7

    In spring a whorl of leaves grows from the ground.  Then a second whorl of leaves grows from inside the 1st whorl. A long, bare stem grows from the 2nd whorl of leaves. and then a single, white 5-petaled flower tops the stem. In fall it turns into a green cylinder then transforms to cottony clouds that blow away in wind.

    $11.95/pot

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    In spring a whorl of leaves grows from the ground.  Then a second whorl of leaves grows from inside the 1st whorl. A long, bare stem grows from the 2nd whorl of leaves. and then a single, white 5-petaled flower tops the stem. In fall it turns into a green cylinder then transforms to cottony clouds that blow away in wind.

    Size: 2’ x 12”
    Care: full sun to part shade in well-drained soil.
    Native: Maine to Delaware, British Columbia to Arizona and all parts in between. Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Leaves causing mouth irritation deters rabbit and deer. Pollinated by bees and flies.

    HoChunk and Winnebago put masticated fuzz from the seeds on boils or carbuncles, opening them after a day.   Sioux used the rot, a tap root, to treat burns, headaches and headaches.  Collected for botany from the wild before 1880’s.  Plant emits allelopathogin inhibiting seed germination of other plants.

  • Anemone sylvestris Snowdrop anemone/Wind flower Z 4-9

    Spring and sporadically in fall - pure white saucers with contrasting yellow stamens

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Spring and sporadically in fall – pure white saucers with contrasting yellow stamens

    Size: 12-20" x 12-20" spreading
    Care: Sun to part shade, moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe and Caucasus, “grows naturally in many parts of Germany… ”Gardeners’ Dictionary, 1768

    In 1629 Parkinson extolled the Anemone: “The sight of them doth enforce an earnest longing in the mind of anyone to be a possessour of some of them…”  The leaves of the plant were used in ointment made into “cold grieses” was used to “warm and comfort the parts (and) the roote… is apt to drawe downe rheume if it be tasted or chewed.”  Paradisi in Sole Paradisus Terrestris.  The word Anemone is Sanskrit meaning “he breathes.” The Roman, Pliny wrote that the Anemone only opens with the wind. The name Anemone is Greek for the wind, “so called, because the flower is supposed not to open, except the wind blows.” The Gardeners’ Dictionary, 1768.  In Greek mythology Anemos, the Wind, uses these flowers to herald his coming in early spring.  Grown by Jefferson at Monticello.