Black Walnut Tolerant

Showing 1–4 of 114 results

  • Ajuga genevensis Geneva Bugle Z 4-9

    True blue 6” spikes in spring and early summer

    $7.25/4" pot

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    Ajuga genevensis  Geneva Bugle  Z 4-9
    True blue 6” spikes in spring and early summer. Great groundcover.

    Size: 6” x 12”
    Care: full sun to shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe
    Wildlife Value: Tolerates foot traffic. Deer and rabbit resistant.

    William Robinson, father of the mixed perennial garden, called this “among the best.” (1933).  In gardens before 1753.

  • Alcea rosea Hollyhock BIENNIAL

    Early to late summer spikes of single platters - mixed colors. The classic cottage garden flower.

    $9.45/bareroot

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    Alcea rosea   Hollyhock   BIENNIAL reseeds  Z 4-9
    Early to late summer spikes of single platters – mixed colors. The classic cottage garden flower.

    Size: 5-8' x 24"
    Care: Sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: West Asia
    Wildlife Value: Butterfly plant, host for Painted Lady butterflies

    Cultivated in China for thousands of years where it symbolized the passing of time. They cooked the leaves for a vegetable and also ate the buds. Transported from Middle East to Europe by the Crusaders and introduced to England by the 1400’s. Culpepper, a 17th century English herbalist, claimed the plant could be used to cure ailments of the “belly, Stone, Reins, Kidneys, Bladder, Coughs, Shortness of Breath, Wheesing, … the King’s Evil,, Kernels, Chin-cough, Wounds, Bruises, Falls. . . (and) Sun-burning.” Both single and double forms grew in England by the time of Parkinson (1629). Parkinson said they came “in many and sundry colours.” John Winthrop Jr. introduced the 1st hollyhock to the New World in the 1630’s.

  • Alcea rosea var. nigra Black hollyhock BIENNIAL Z 4-9

    Early to late summer spikes of single jet-black/maroon platters.  

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    $9.95/bareroot

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    Alcea rosea var. nigra  Black hollyhock BIENNIAL Z 4-9

    Early to late summer spikes of single jet-black/maroon platters.

     

    Size: 5-8’ x 24”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: West Asia
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and birds

    Hollyhocks have been cultivated in China for thousands of years where it symbolized the passing of time. They cooked the leaves for a vegetable and also ate the buds. Transported from Middle East to Europe by the Crusaders and introduced to England by 1573. Grown in the Eichstätt Garden, the garden of Johann Konrad von Gemmingen, prince bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria, c. 1600. Culpepper, a 17th century English herbalist, claimed the plant could be used to cure ailments of the “belly, Stone, Reins, Kidneys, Bladder, Coughs, Shortness of Breath, Wheesing, … the King’s Evil,, Kernels, Chin-cough, Wounds, Bruises, Falls. . . (and) Sun-burning.” Both single and double forms grew in England by the time of Parkinson (1629). Parkinson said they came “in many and sundry colours.” John Winthrop Jr. introduced the 1st hollyhock to the New World in the 1630’s.

    In the 1880’s Mr. W. Charter of Saffron Walden in England cultivated frilly doubles, now known as ‘Charter’s Doubles.’

  • Allium christophii syn. Allium albopilosum Star of Persia, Persian onion Z 4-8

    Awesome purple globe-shaped flowers nearly a foot across in late spring to early summer. Ephemeral. Flowerhead make stunning years long dried arrangements

    $5.95/bareroot

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    Allium christophii  syn. Allium albopilosum     Star of Persia, Persian onion Z 4-8
    Awesome purple globe-shaped flowers nearly a foot across in late spring to early summer. Ephemeral. Flowerhead make stunning years long dried arrangements

    Size: 1-2’ x 1’
    Care: sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Iran and Turkey
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant. Walnut tolerant
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society award of Garden Merit

    Named Star of Persia for the 100 star shaped flowers that make up each flower head.
    Described by German botanist and plant explorer Ernst Rudolf von Trautvetter (1809-1889) in 1884. He worked at botanic gardens and universities in Kiev and St. Petersburg for 40 years.