Black Walnut Tolerant

Showing 97–104 of 106 results

  • Tradescantia virginiana Spiderwort Z 4-9

    bluish lavender to purple 3 petaled stars with showy yellow stamens

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Prominent pendulous buds open to bluish lavender to purple 3-petaled stars with showy yellow stamens. Free blooming from June thru September.

    Size: 18-24" x 24"
    Care: Full sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: From New York to South Dakota, Virginia and Arkansas

    Named after English planthunter John Tradescant the Younger, who introduced this plant to garden cultivation in 1637.   Parkinson explains the origin of this plant: “This Spider-wort is of late knowledge, and for it the Christian world is indebted unto that painfull industrious searcher, and lover of all natures varieties, John Tradescant who first received it of a friend, that brought it out of Virginia,” (1639). Cherokee ate the young greens and prescribed it to cure stomachaches after overeating, female illnesses, cancer and insect bites.  Menominee revived those “defiled by touch of bereaved.” By 1659 ones with white, light blue and reddish flowers grown in England.

  • Trillium grandiflorum Large flowered Trillium, Wake robin Z 4-8

    Pure white trio of petals atop whorl of leaves in May. Ephemeral.

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    OUT OF STOCK – Available for purchase in Spring only

    Pure white trio of petals atop whorl of leaves in May. Ephemeral.

    Size: 12-18” x slowly spreading
    Care: shade to part shade in moist soil
    Native: Quebec to Georgia, west to Minnesota WI native
    Awards: Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden Great Plant Picks

    Chippewa made decoctions of Trillium for aching joints & sore ears. Menominee cured many ailments with this Trillium: irregular menstrual periods, cramps, diuretic, swollen eyes and “sore nipples and teats pierced with a dog whisker.” Collected by Frenchman André Michaux (1746-1802) who spent 11 years in America collecting hundreds of new plants.

  • Uvularia grandiflora Largeflower bellwort, Fairybells Z 4-9

    Graceful, hanging pale yellow bells, like a gypsy’s skirt, in spring

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Graceful, hanging pale yellow bells, like a gypsy’s skirt, in spring

    Size: 10-20” x 6” spread slowly
    Care: part shade to shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Quebec to Ontario, NH to ND, Louisiana to Georgia, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit

    Menominee reduced swelling with this plant. Ojibwa cured stomach pains and Potawatomi mixed it with lard to cure sore muscles & backaches. Collected for gardens by 1802. Wm. Robinson considered this a “graceful perennial … the finest of the species.”

  • Vernonia noveboracensis Ironweed Z 4-8

    numerous deep crimson- purple daisies

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Heads of numerous deep royal purple daisies, August to September

    Size: 5' x 2'
    Care: Sun in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: from Massachusetts to Florida
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Named for English botanist William Vernon. Infusions of the plant used by Cherokee to relieve pain after childbirth, for loose teeth and for stomach ulcers.

  • Veronica gentianoides Gentian speedwell Z. 4-9

    Palest of true blue flowers

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Palest of true blue flowers bloom on 18″ spikes in early summer.

    Can not ship to: Illinois

    Size: 18" x 18"
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: eastern Europe
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies
    Awards: England's Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    According to Christian tradition, as Jesus carried the cross to Calvary a woman wiped his face with her handkerchief, leaving the imprint of Christ’s features, the vera iconica, meaning “the true likeness.”  When the Catholic Church canonized the woman, the Church gave her the name Saint Veronica.  Medieval gardeners named the plant after her due to a perceived likeness of the flower to her handkerchief.  V. gentianoides was introduced to European garden cultivation in 1784. Grown in American gardens since 1850.

  • Veronica liwanensis Turkish speedwell Z 4-8

    Tiny true blue saucers smother the ground

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Tiny true blue saucers smother the ground in May & June – groundcover, front of border or rock garden plant.

    Size: 1” x 18” spreader over time
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: NE Anatolia, Caucasus
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies
    Awards: 1997 Plant Select Winner.

    Collected before 1849.

  • Veronica prostrata syn. V. rupestris Sprawling speedwell, Harebell speedwelll Z 4-8

    From midspring to midsummer short blue spikes above prostrate foliage.

    $6.95/pot

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    From midspring to midsummer short blue spikes above prostrate foliage.

    Size: 6” x 18”spreads
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil.
    Native: Europe
    Wildlife Value: Deer and rabbit resistant.
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    In gardens since at least 1762 (Linnaeus). Bloomed for 4 or more months in rock garden at Edinburgh Botanic Garden (The Garden, Jan. 1876.)

  • Veronica repens Creeping speedwell Z 5-9

    Palest of blue blooms in spring

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Palest of blue blooms in spring on this low, creeping groundcover. Best for rock gardens, troughs, or front of the border.

    Size: 2” x 8-12”
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Corsica

    According to Christian tradition, as Jesus carried the cross to Calvary a woman wiped his face with her handkerchief, leaving the imprint of Christ’s features, the vera iconica, meaning “the true likeness.”  When the Catholic Church canonized the woman the Church named her Saint Veronica.  Medieval gardeners named the plant after her due to a perceived likeness of the flower to her handkerchief.  This species collected by 1800.  According to William Robinson, father of the mixed perennial garden, Veronica repens “clothes the soil with a soft carpet of bright green foliage, covered in spring with pale bluish flowers.”